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GreatSchools Rating

Cascade K-8 Community School

Public | K-8 | 165 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 6 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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Parent involvement

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22 reviews of this school


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Posted August 22, 2013

We absolutely love CK8 and couldn't recommend it highly enough. The whole school goes camping twice a year, 3 night and 4 days in the Spring, and 1 night 2 days in the Fall. This alone was enough to sell me on the school, but it turns out there are so many more wonderful things about it. The kids are excited to be there. They are creative, curious, and smart. Because it's an alternative school, it seems that most of the families there are just a little different. This adds to the diversity of the school and the kids don't tend to exclude other kids based on them being different. It's a community school. Everyone gets to know each other and most of the kids know me by name. If you're worried that you don't have time for a community school, you should know that there is no pressure to be active. You don't have to log certain hours volunteering or anything like that. Because of the mixed age setting, the older kids are protective of and the younger kids admire the older kids. The art program is award winning, the foreign language teacher is phenomenal, and the after school music program has been fabulous. I could go on but am out of space.....
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

Cascade is a small public school, dedicated to educating your child in ways they can actually learn. They have extensive art and science programs, monthly electives, market days and outdoor education in the form of all-school camp twice a year. It is run with community involvement meaning all the parents help out to make the curriculum happen. And parent volunteering can take any form from leading an elective class in your favorite hobby to website coordinator and every level of involvement in between. This school will not only teach your child how to read, write and draw, it will also teach them how to be part of a community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

We've been at Cascade K-8 for 4 years and love the community! It's a very involved group of parents, staff and students all working to create some really great learning experiences for the kids. The focus really is on EXPERIENCING learning rather than opening a text book and completing worksheets. We love the small, close community, age mixing, project based curriculum, fall/spring camps, student self-assessments, art, science, and so much more!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

Cascade K-8 Community School has been the best school for my daughter. The community is amazing; the teachers are incredible; and we have had an excellent experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

Our experience with Cascade K8 has been over 6 years. Both of my boys are achieving high scores (4's) on the MSP every spring. However, more importantly, along with their regular academics the emphasis in Math and Science and Art and Technology are stellar. Project based learning supplements the general curriculum in a way that promotes long term acquisition of skills and a learning environment packed with opportunity. Parents are involved because they want to be and because all of the "extras" in the school wouldn't happen without their work. However, for the working parent, there are ample volunteer opportunities and ways to help with flexibility in time. No school is perfect, but, I am liking our experience and the positives well outweigh any negatives we have encountered!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2013

Both my girls go to Cascade. My oldest in Journey and my youngest in Kinder. I would not have them attend anywhere else! We love the teachers and community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 2, 2012

I went to Room Nine for middle school (6/7/8) I was toally prepared to go to high school. I'm currently taking honors classes and doing well. I think the person who said Room Nine didn't prepapre them for high school must not have been a very motivated student. During the time I was there, my interest and competence in science and math improved substantially.


Posted February 2, 2012

great middle school program with s.t.e.a.m. focus. only k-8 in shoreline. caring teachers, active community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 2, 2012

The new program manager (principal) at Room Nine is doing a fantastic job of creating a dynamic program for the kids. Implementing STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) has meant that my 6th grader is working on project-based, team learning with applications to the real world. It feels like high school at the Middle School level. I couldn't be more pleased!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2012

We love Room Nine Community K-8 school. It's Shoreline's only K-8 and has allowed my kids to avoid going to middle school, because let's face it, whoever thought *that* was a good idea has a screw loose. This school focuses on experiential and outdoor learning and the middle school prgram has a STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math) focus. This school really is the unknown treasure of the Shoreline Schol District, and as such, the district ought to be ashamed of not supporting it more.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2012

Here is why I think the state test scores do not reflect the brilliance of this school. First off it's a tiny school. If you have 10 kids taking the test, and one bombs the test, that's 10% of the school's grade. Some grades only have four kids. So, if one kid bombs, that's 25% of the school's score. Next, add in the several families, who fundamentally don't believe in testing. When their child "opts out" of the test, that child gets a zero for the state. Again, this greatly affects the test scores. I would highly recommend that you take the time to tour the school, and see if it is a good fit for you. They got a new principle a few years ago. So, a lot has changed in the structure of the program in the last 3-4 years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2012

Room Nine K-8 is really a wonderful place for students to learn. In the three years we've been there, I've watched the community come together to support excellent academics while also staying true to providing an experience where kids can engage with the world around them and reinforce their academics through actual experiences. With our middle school STEAM program, our focus on outdoor education, our emphasis on world language, and our strong sense of community and school spirit, I feel like we're getting the quality education that a private school can provide, but in a public school setting! It's like the best of all worlds! And we even get to skip middle school! You should check out this hidden gem. You might just fall in love!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2011

Room Nine Community School is a wonderful community marked by acceptance and interaction. This is a school for self-directed learners. These kids get the opportunity to learn at their own level, easily moving into higher learning. This school is not for students that are not intrinsically interested in learning for learning's sake. The Outdoor Learning component for all grades, the Bike-A-Thon, the years of tradition and community involvement make this a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2007

I have been a parent at this school for the past 8 years, and I will be involved for at least another 6. My oldest son is a freshman, and I see that the school teaches what is needed to be a successful adult. The WASL scores were some of the highest in the state, for who cares about that. I do wish there were more opportunities for sports, but art and music are well covered.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2007

Maybe because I am new to the Room Nine program, we are still in the 'honeymoon' stage of the relationship but I feel this is the best choice for my child. I have already seen great results from her taking a decisive choice in her learning and takes pride in accomplishments she has achived. I plan on being very involved in my child's education and look forward to working with her and many of her school mates and the school to establish a long term relationship with my child's growth. Submitted by a parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2007

Room Nine is a fun place for kids to go to because we go on lots of field trips and the teachers are really nice. It's a good place to learn. We have lots of recess, too! [parent edit: no more than any other school!] Teachers respect us and help us work out any problems. Try it you'll like it!
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 9, 2007

I was a student and i feel the academics at room nine were poor, school spent too much time worrying about what kids were getting bullied or how they were going to set up a play. This school was not organized and it did not have me prepared for school. You were not given actull grades but you were graded as either a scholar highest practiconer apprentice or novice. There are not enough staff members i feel to teach proper middle school material. I learned very little at that school most time was spent on field trips or doing art projects or having a community meeting about bullys. I was way behind when i got to highschool. I would not reccomend sending your child here. it also did not prepare you for the social life you will be seeing in highschool.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 30, 2007

I have had 3 children in this K-8 school, oldest is 22, youngest is 8, in Melissa's class for the third year in a row. Melissa was Shoreline School District's Teacher of the Year last year and is amazing. So calm and organized, the kids love her and she cares for each one of them, sees the good in what they can do. 2 oldest are successful students in college and at Shorecrest. High grades, know how to study. Despite not having tons of 'busywork' in Room Nine, they adjusted well to high school. I can't say enough for the philosophy and dedication of both staff and parent community. Truly a community. Older groups can take music and do sports at middle schools. Lots of art and field trips and camps for all levels. 3 learning 'clusters' - K-2, 3-5 and 6-8. Self-assessment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 16, 2006

A wonderful school. The self-assessments are eye-opening, how kids rate themselves and make goals for what they're doing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 5, 2005

The kids who attend this school typically go on to honors classes in high school. We were very pleased with the focus on how to learn and self-assessment. The teachers and staff are attentive because the size of the school is small.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
50%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
43%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
58%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
75%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
33%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
33%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students65%
Female50%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low incomen/a
Not low income70%
Special educationn/a
Not special education65%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students73%
Female75%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low incomen/a
Not low income78%
Special educationn/a
Not special education74%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students67%
Femalen/a
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Low incomen/a
Not low income73%
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students80%
Femalen/a
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low incomen/a
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 72% 60%
Two or more races 10% 6%
Hispanic 8% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 7%
Black 4% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 118%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 227%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 15N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 88%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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17077 Meridian Ave North
Shoreline, WA 98133
Website: Click here
Phone: (206) 393-4180

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