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GreatSchools Rating

Snohomish High School

Public | 9-12 | 1736 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted August 22, 2013

I really wouldn't want to go anywhere else. The school spirit is terrific, and despite the size, there is still very few instances of bullying and fighting, at least from my viewpoint. Now I am also coming from the perspective of an ASB officer, but I love to go to this school, and it is super easy to get involved. Although I do understand what some of these former comments are referring to when they say if you have not lived here for generations you are not as easily accepted, but this truly is a great community, and I wouldn't want to live anywhere else.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 25, 2010

The staff who go beyond educating their students. The location is right in town-in the historical district. Wonderful traditions - serpentine parade and spirit week during homecoming. Strong academic programs, great diversity of clubs, amazing variety of athletics and a community that supports them. And the beautiful BIG TREE where students and parents meet.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 5, 2009

I came to this district after being in Seattle and the education was so much better I had to run to catch up, but now that i have its still a challenging environment.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 4, 2009

it's bad. if you haven't lived in snohomish for 5 or more years, they won't accept you. snohomish is a trap, once you move here you never leave; there's generations of families here. the majority of them are not friendly, or really welcoming in any way. this school has good classes, teachers and extra curricular activities, but the social aspect of the school is terrible. i have seen quite a few new kids come here, and they rarely ever really find a place where they fit in and are accepted. and the ones who have found their place didn't find it for a long time, most of the students don't give someone who isn't in their clique the time of day.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 8, 2009

My eldest son transferred in as a junior from overseas and quickly assimilated due to the excellent teaching staff and administration. The academics were rigorous, as were the extra-curricular activities (of which there were many opportunities presented, including non-sport-related). Additionally, parental involvement is encouraged and even required to some degree. My son graduated with not only high academic achievement, but also a greater sense of responsibility overall. We were very pleased with the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2008

When I first came to this school, I nearly had to pull teath to get people to be social. The entire mindset in my opinoin is very limited if you yourself have not been in the community for a few years. Despite the vast amount of school spirit, it is difficult to just get into the flow of things. The teachers are very nice and the school in general has decent programs. There is a select few that will really help you out according to your needs and what you want out of your education.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 9, 2008

Most of the teachers are great. Some teachers are in a High School mindset and do things to be liked by their students which is not conducive to the learning environment. The administration is extremly lax on bullying.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 28, 2007

After seeing Zaro's Review, I was compelled to write one. The school is fantastic. I'm a senior about to graduate from this school, and I can tell you now, there is no school that honestly compares to this school. Their selection of extra curricular activities, teachers and classes are superb. If there is any where I would recommend, it would be the home of the Panthers! The energy and sense of community contained within this school is phenomenal. You really feel like you are part of something. Not only that, but Snohomish is known to be a friendly community, with friendly people and friendly neighbors. With such diverse individuals, finding an enjoyable and rich experience is never to far from your reach. The support from everyone will give you a true sense of 'second family.' There are no fights, or over-the-top teenage drama queens, just smiles, laughter, and love.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 8, 2007

This is an okay school, I go there and I don't like it very much. If I had the chance to change schools, I would do it in a heart beat.The school has way too many people, class sizes are very large. There is a ton of school spirit, we probably have the most school spirit compared to any school. This school is kind of like a farming school, there are a lot of 'farmer kids,' but that is probably normal considering it's a farming town. It's not really a college-prep school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 1, 2007

Snohomish High School is Great. Cliques exist but what school doesn't have them. SHS is on the whole very friendly to newcomers. With such a big school we have a great amount of pride and are very close. It's a good thing they're not going to try to split up the senior class in 2009, when the new school opens, they would have problems. The teachers know what they're doing, and parents help with whatever they can. We have numerous extra-curricular activities, a few were created this year. Many people are involved and committed to multiple. Too many to list here, but I encourage you to look into our school, especially if you're thinking of adding to our spirit by joining us. I'm a sophomore, and am looking forward to the rest of high school! Thank-you for letting me babble.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 4, 2005

SHS is a great school academically, but is in dire need of the upcoming remodel. I encourage anyone who has sentimental attachments to tour the campus behind the scenes and see for yourself the conditions that we expect our kids and teachers to work with. You will be sadly shocked! The old fashioned charm of the community needs to be kept and using some items from the old gym in a special way is needed. Times are changing, and now is time to prepare for the future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2005

Snohomish high school is a widely diverse school. A school of oppertunities. Enrolling your students in Snohoish High School is a posiitve step towards the future! I am a sophomore at this school right now! i love our school and i believe that it is the right place for a child to learn!
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

238 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
75%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
98%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
94%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
62%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

333 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
66%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

230 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
79%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
61%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students66%
Female60%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic70%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Low income47%
Not low income74%
Special education46%
Not special education67%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students95%
Female94%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income95%
Special educationn/a
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White99%
Low incomen/a
Not low income99%
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students35%
Female51%
Male22%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic25%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White34%
Low income24%
Not low income42%
Special education21%
Not special education43%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students68%
Female71%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic41%
Multiracial56%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low income57%
Not low income71%
Special education52%
Not special education70%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students80%
Female78%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic72%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low income85%
Not low income79%
Special educationn/a
Not special education80%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students19%
Female15%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White23%
Low incomen/a
Not low income18%
Special educationn/a
Not special education15%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students18%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

425 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
43%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

446 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

357 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
46%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

438 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students85%
Female90%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanic78%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income80%
Not low income87%
Special education67%
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students88%
Female94%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income78%
Not low income92%
Special education72%
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 85% 60%
Hispanic 7% 20%
Two or more races 4% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 7%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 113%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 224%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 21N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 67%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1316 Fifth St
Snohomish, WA 98290
Phone: (360) 563-4001

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