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GreatSchools Rating

Mead Senior High School

Public | 9-12 | 1597 students

We are best known for academics, arts, and athletics.

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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Parent involvement

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21 reviews of this school


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Posted September 26, 2013

Mead High School has the greatest mix of academics and sports, drama and arts to fulfill any student's wish list. Having moved here from CA. last year, my now 10th grade student settled in easily and nicely. All the students are nice and there are lots of clubs and sports to get involved in. Being ranked high on the list of top schools in the state and the nation doesn't hurt your resume either! Mead is a school where if you give it your best.....everyone succeeds! We love Mead.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 6, 2012

As good as high schools get in Spokane, and that says much. Mead High has a very dedicated principal and staff, a creative approach to teaching, and strong performance metrics to show for it. Our kids have been very happy, and considerably more challenged than they were in their Seattle schools. Technology resources are strong. The school has an amazingly dedicated, supportive community. We're happy we came here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 22, 2011

I am a freshman this year. My year has been pretty good so far. the teachers are nice and try to help you. also i wanted to change some of my classes and my consuler helped me with that. i feel included at school, mostly everyone is nice to me
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 8, 2011

I do not enjoy going to mead. They took away shop and are adding more difficult technology/computer based classes, and not every student that goes to mead is cut out for that kind of course. They have a good education if you are a genius, but for the kids that don't do to well in advanced class it is really hard. My other siblings agree with me, mead is more of a private school rather than a public school. But hey if you are really smart and can handle the classes you will do great there! It is also a very "clicky" school. I am not saying it is terrible, but i feel there is better schools out there.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 16, 2011

I think that Mead is an awesome High School! I will be a sophmore this fall and I am so excited! I am in the jazz band, marching band, and concert band programs and they are all amazing! The principal is very nice and respects everyone. The academics are wonderful, and I wouldn't switch with any other High School in the area. -Kendra (K-Kay)
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 11, 2010

As long as the child wishes to learn, Mead is a wonderful school. The teachers, especially those in the Honors/AP Program, encourage the students to succeed and are always willing to help. The only reason why I rated it 4 instead of 5 is due to a certain 'cliqueness' that occurs when people have been in the Mead district their whole lives. For me, a student who moved here from Seattle, it was very difficult to make friends with those who had lived in North Spokane their entire lives and whose parents had graduated from Mead as well. However, after joining the drama club (which is quite fantastic, perfect for the shy kid who wants to find his or her place in the world) and taking Honors classes, I made some great friends. Unfortunately, the school has no IB program, which also hurt its score.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 14, 2008

All three of my kids graduated from Mead and two of three were involved in school based activities. All three were high academic achievers, especially in math and science. One earned a National Merit Finalist award and free 4 yr scholarship. Despite my encouragement, this did not prepare them for life after high school nor did it motivate them to pursue successful careers. The most successful is the one that was the least involved in H.S.. The school has too many liberal teachers who promote the big idea - do gooder attitude. Save the poor! Join a service organaization and travel the world! They should be directing these kids to go to college and join the real world first. They don't!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 12, 2008

I have taught in California and Washington. Of the 3 schools that I have taught at Mead High School is superior. The student body is phenomenal, the parents are supportive, and, for me, my colleagues and administration are enthusiastic about what they do. This is a school I look forward to going to every day.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 13, 2008

The nationally recognized Mead Senior High School... what is there to say? Test scores are great, students are excelling academically and extracellularly, and students are leaving this school with more than enough knowledge and preparation to enter further education. Teachers are well educated and are enthusiastic to teach these children. In fact, my son's chemistry teacher actually contacts chemistry professors from WSU to ensure that students are leaving with the understanding to be able to enter chemistry in college, skipping the chem 100 and 101 classes. The music programs are top notch, and the sports teams are nationally recognized. Administration connects well with the parents and students and the councilors are fantastic. Mead High really does live up to its name in that Mead offers a student-centered and student-friendly atmosphere where success is encouraged, expected, and attained.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2008

Mead High School came very high recommended, but we have found the overall school experience to be below average, as far as teacher/coaches support and encouragement of all the students that are either in their class or sports team. The adminstration has been non-responsive in attempting to openly discuss our concerns and frustrations
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2008

My husband and his 7 siblings all graduated from here. We are continuing the legacy with our own four children attending (or soon to be attending) Mead. The academics are challenging and the students graduate well prepared for college. The sports, music, drama and art departments are outstanding. The are a host of extracurricular clubs/activities that offer a wide variety of opportunities for student participation. There is truly something for everyone here and the adminstration and faculty are tops. There is a real sense of community at this school that is fostered from the principal on down. We feel very fortunate to live in this school district.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2006

Amazing school. This is the 'leader of the pack' in Spokane. Great academics, athletics and area of town. I couldn't have asked for more.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2006

What a great High School! This is truely a classy school were children are learning more then I expected from a public school. We're saving money not continuing education in a private school. We researched and found that MHS does just as nice if not a better job preparing our children for college and the real world. My children are excelling and have so many colleges from all over our country looking at them. Love all the extra program; sports, debate, chess and math club (my oldest does all). There are so many other activities at MHS. Mead is the best!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2005

Mead High School has a wonderful spirit to it. The administration is welcoming, the academc advisors interested and caring, and the teachers committed to their students. There are programs for every type of student, whether they want college prep classes or trade school type preparation. Students are encouraged to participate in extracurricular activities and there are a wide range of programs available. The school has recently undergown a major rennovation, bringing the facility to the quality of a new school. Parents are very interested in their children's education and are very involved and supportive of the administration and programs. It's hard to imagine a better high school than Mead High School.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2005

Mead school district as a whole is a wonderful school district. I am very impressed with mead high. The staff is very involved with the student body and counslers are on top of their duties. Academics are #1 at this school and there is help for those who struggle. We love mead schools!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 28, 2005

Mead has a lot to offer. Their acedemic programs are amazing. Your child can excell in many different ways but Mead strives for the best education. There are many musical opportunities, as well as opportunities in art, sports, acedemics and student involvement in all of these. If you want to be a parent helper there are many opportunities for you too. There is just too much to say about Mead and I can't say it all.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 6, 2005

This is a great school, safe, lots of sports, great parent involvement. There is a definite soft grading here and the only way to get a good experience is to get the kid in some A.P. classes which are still few and far between here.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 30, 2005

I feel that the mead school district is one of the best in Spokane. We left district 81 for a better school (private was out of our reach) and have never regretted the change. The resource dept for extra help in classes is superior. The music program is rated very near the number one position in Wa and the school has a very dedicated staff and parent support group.
—Submitted by an administrator


Posted January 13, 2005

We moved to the Mead School District when our children were in 6th grade because we'd been told that Mead excelled in their music program. That was an Understatement! We have watched both of our children stand on many winner's stages after jazz & marching competitions. They have learned the value of hard work and discipline. A high percentage of the HS students are involved in instrumental and vocal music. Best of all, the school's academic programs and staff are excellent! Being a former teacher myself, I can see how the high level of parental involvement contributes to the overall quality of all the district's schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2003

I moved to this district so my two sons could attend Mead High School. It was the best thing I could have done for them. They both received full scholarships. The two boys were quite different, one very artistic, and one very academic, both athletic. The school had programs tailored to both of their needs, and had high quality teachers. I knew many parents because of the involvement ranging from cleaning up the gym after a wrestling match, to sponsoring the senior 'all nighter'.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

272 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
36%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
96%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
97%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
19%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

282 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
87%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

188 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
74%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
43%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students58%
Female57%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracial45%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Low income48%
Not low income62%
Special education19%
Not special education65%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income94%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female98%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial82%
White99%
Low income88%
Not low income100%
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students41%
Female54%
Male34%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Low income19%
Not low income63%
Special education15%
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students85%
Female86%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic84%
Multiracial60%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income79%
Not low income89%
Special education68%
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students87%
Female88%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income79%
Not low income90%
Special educationn/a
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students21%
Female19%
Male23%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White22%
Low income7%
Not low income33%
Special educationn/a
Not special education26%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

361 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
49%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

392 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
91%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

378 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
63%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

383 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students89%
Female94%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic86%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income81%
Not low income92%
Special education45%
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students95%
Female97%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic90%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income88%
Not low income97%
Special education63%
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 85% 60%
Two or more races 9% 6%
Hispanic 5% 20%
Black 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 16%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 225%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

College readiness and student pathways

Students typically attend these schools prior to attending this school Northwood Middle School
St. Thomas More
Colleges most students attend after graduation Washington State University
Eastern Washington University
University of Washington
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 17N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 15N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 84%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • Silver Medalist - US News & World Report's Best High Schools (2010)
  • Newsweek's Top High Schools (2010)
  • STEM Lighthouse School - State of Washington (2010)

Special education / special needs

Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Speech and language impairments

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production
Clubs
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Honors track
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • Community college courses
  • School-sponsored trips to college campuses
  • Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Kenneth Russell
Special schedule
  • Block scheduling

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Core knowledge
  • Honors track
  • Virtual school
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Speech and language impairments
Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Spanish

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Career/college counseling
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • Community college courses
  • School-sponsored trips to college campuses
  • Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer
  • Gym
  • Library
School leaders can update this information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Yearbook
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Neither uniforms nor dress code
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
 

What are your chances?

Students typically come from these schools
Northwood Middle School
St. Thomas More

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Washington State University
Eastern Washington University
University of Washington
College preparation / awareness offered
Community college courses
College prep programs/courses during the year
School-sponsored trips to college campuses
Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
College presentations or information sessions
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

302 West Hastings Rd
Spokane, WA 99218
Phone: (509) 465-7000

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