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GreatSchools Rating

Rogers High School

Public | 9-12 | 1669 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted January 31, 2013

I see a lot of spelling and grammar mistakes in the reviews posted by former students. They all seem to of had a lot of fun but that isn't going to help them get a job.


Posted November 11, 2010

To correct the previous statement, I'm sure you received GREAT education. I believe Rogers to be a school where creativity is supported and I commend those whom attend Rogers for this; However, not only academically but socially Rogers High School graduates (few that there are) could do better with one to two more years of schooling. Especially if said students are interested in progressing to University. All in all, I would suggest taking a second look at any other high schools your student could possibly attend. Consider Gonzaga Prep, just down the road. Often the expense of private school turn families away but with their fair-share tuition, the tuition is adjusted per family income making the school affordable for all.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 16, 2009

I had so much fun there and got a grate education!!!!


Posted December 2, 2008

I am a proud graduate of Rogers. I owe that school everything. It made me who I am today. Unfortunately, because of the low income zip code that it resides in, it has a very bad reputation. Having graduated valedictorian, I am forever thankful to the faculty at Rogers who seem to care more than they have to. I attended Shadle for a brief period my sophomore year and was extremely let down. At Rogers, diversity brings people together, and overcoming the negativity that surrounds the school bonds the students and faculty. If I could convince someone to give this school a try, im sure they wouldn't be disappointed
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 9, 2008

I currently attend Rogers high school, and from experience i must tell you that it is a good school. When i first started i was slightly afraid because of it rep. I have now been there for 2 years and i have relized that it is a wonderfull school full of great oppurtunitys. Its true we dont have the highest budget in our school system, but who cares? And just because a smalll percentage of student give our school a bad name, and just because stats show thing , it doesnt showw the tudents that go there that have hopes and dreams.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 11, 2008

Like any other school, Rogers has a lot of positive characteristics intertwined with challenges they are trying to overcome. Personally, I think any given student can gain more from Rogers than any other school in Spokane, but conversely, they will have to work harder for it. Thankfully, this is ideal. Diversity, for example, ranges from the socioeconomic to the racial. Differences make things more difficult, but you learn from your differences and become proud in defining yourself through them. Any prestigious college in America will share those same difficulties with Rogers, but they do so purposely. If you are really looking to give your child an education, give it to them. Don't let reputation deprive them. I go to an ivy-league institution and I promise two things. No school in Spokane could of sent me better prepared, and without them, I would never be here.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 24, 2008

4 stars: Very friendly and helpful staff. Open Door Policy. The studen't feel that they belong and that makes the school of Rogers High very Special and Unique.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 27, 2007

Im a gradute of rogers, i went all four years. i loved the school and the environment, it is THE most divers school youll ever go to, and i think thats what scares alot of kids. the school does have a bad rep but you have no idea how good of a school it is unless you went there. there are some amazing teachers and office staff and theres the few who i feel should teach at rogers becuase of there attitude towards student. all in all this is a wonderful school youll meet a lot of people, have lots of fun and education, and great experances!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 29, 2005

I was very pleased with the photographer teacher, however, I feel that the other teachers are pretty burned out. The school supports some of the most troubled kids in Spokane. The teachers are so busy trying to discipline the kids that they have nothing left for teaching. On top of that, the budget cuts that district 81 has had to endure has definately proven destructive to the school and the staff. My daughter and I feel very strongly that she will not go back to this school next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2005

I Went to Rogers and I loved it. You get to know the teachers on a more personal level. It's a very close school. It has a wide range of sports from Gymnastics to golf to football.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 11, 2005

I went to Rogers for the first two years of my high school career, none of which I regret. The atmosphere at Rogers is very relaxed. Academically rogers is about average, but the student-teacher interaction is great. If you need help it's there. Rogers is probably one of the most diverse schools out there, which makes it an easy school for anyone to make friends at. Rogers also has the best coaching staff for baseball, it would take alot to convince me otherwise.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

246 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

154 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
72%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
91%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

120 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
36%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

249 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
59%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

229 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
56%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
33%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
25%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students41%
Female45%
Male39%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander35%
Hispanic29%
Multiracial45%
Native American40%
Pacific Islander33%
White45%
Low income38%
Not low income59%
Special education29%
Not special education45%
Limited English20%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students82%
Female82%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic76%
Multiracial71%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income79%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students88%
Female85%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracial83%
White86%
Low income85%
Not low income95%
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students24%
Female26%
Male21%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander21%
Hispanic23%
Multiracial20%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White25%
Low income24%
Not low income24%
Special education21%
Not special education25%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students44%
Female33%
Male52%
Black10%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander18%
Hispanic38%
Multiracial44%
Native American39%
Pacific Islander0%
White50%
Low income40%
Not low income61%
Special education45%
Not special education43%
Limited English23%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students53%
Female46%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asian64%
Asian/Pacific Islander38%
Hispanic32%
Multiracial43%
Native American27%
Pacific Islander10%
White63%
Low income51%
Not low income58%
Special education33%
Not special education54%
Limited English47%
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Female17%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander8%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English8%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students21%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income25%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education23%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

385 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
21%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

360 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
64%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

338 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
33%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

349 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students70%
Female75%
Male66%
Black50%
Asian75%
Asian/Pacific Islander48%
Hispanic58%
Native American75%
Pacific Islander8%
White76%
Low income69%
Not low income78%
Special education46%
Not special education74%
Limited English30%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students74%
Female81%
Male68%
Black77%
Asian75%
Asian/Pacific Islander56%
Hispanic64%
Native American81%
Pacific Islander25%
White77%
Low income72%
Not low income84%
Special education56%
Not special education77%
Limited English30%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 76% 63%
American Indian/Alaska Native 5% 2%
Asian 4% 7%
Black 4% 5%
Hispanic 4% 18%
Two or more races 4% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 3% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 169%N/A40%
Transitional bilingual 27%N/A8%
Special education 220%N/A13%
Source: 1 NCES, 2010-2011
Source: 2 WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 16N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 10N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 66%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Nurse(s)
School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Swimming pool
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
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School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Lori Wyborney

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Swimming pool
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Diving
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Water polo
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Diving
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Water polo

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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1622 East Wellesley Ave
Spokane, WA 99207
Phone: (509) 354-6600

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