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GreatSchools Rating

Longfellow Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 541 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
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2013:
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2012:
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2011:
Based on 4 ratings

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Parent involvement

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9 reviews of this school


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Posted July 18, 2011

I was very impressed with the teacher my son had for kindergarten. She was very involved and he excelled quickly. She was also was very willing to answer any questions that I had. I also had interactions with the other kindergarten teachers and found them friendly. The principal was helpful with any issues that needed to be discussed with her also and she always took the time to say hi to me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2011

Do not send your child to this school they do not have a community environment and the things your child will be exposed to are unacceptable. My daughter found a syringe on the playground just for one example.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 28, 2011

The teacher (s) that my daughter had are younger than me, or so it seemed (I'm 23). They did not send homework home because "a lot of parents don't participate" and my girl was bullied by a child who has seen no repercussion except being moved to the other side of the classroom. When I went in and talked about these concerns with her teachers, yes, two of them, they struggled to find answers and put my child on the spot about the bullying concerns, saying she needed to say something to them. Well, if she hadn't why would they have moved to to the other side of the class? They are impersonal and I would love to see their credentials... Oh wait, I can't. Hmmm. And since when did teachers lower their standards based on a lack of parental involvement from some? Where's the accountability?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 28, 2011

My daughter LOVES school. So much so that she would darn near be in tears on Friday, not wanting to not be at school for the weekend. However, we recently moved to the North side of town... and switched schools. Now? She is starting to not like school, and looks forward to the weekend. She gets bullied, and after talking to teachers about it, she STILL gets bullied. The teachers here seem to have a "Oh, well, wadaya gonna do?" attitude and throw their hands up. I am sad over my daughter's drop in enthusiasm for school, and have already made plans to move her to another, she's only been here for a month. Sad, and I'm not going to waste another second pretending these people know how to treat students, both the good ones and the out of line.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2009

My son just started Kindergarten at Longfellow this year and while he has been lucky to have such a great teacher for his first year in the 'big kids' school, this will most definitely be his last. The only decent experience we have had with the school so far has been the family picnic. It seems that the majority of the kids at the school are unruly and disruptive but I have only witnessed this in the before school line ups and at the Cross Country meets and the parents that are there, just turn a blind eye when their child gets physical with another child right in front of them. The teachers are either preoccupied or give the impression that they do not care. I have been disgusted with the overall experience and will be relieved when my child will be attending the better school down the road.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2009

My children have been lucky to have wonderful teachers at longfellow. The principal is great. My daughters have loved all them. They have always been given the encouragement they need. But, I too have wondered why there are no music recitals, and/or plays. When I was in grade school, we always did. And one other thing. How can the district let teachers go? The classes are large enough as it is.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 11, 2007

My child has excelled since she has been in this school. She made friends, she loves her teacher (Mrs. Cline 2nd grade), and she participates in school functions. As far as problem children, I have not had that experience. I think that if a child is brought up properly by loving parents, the teachers and/or school would not have to correct there behavior. We always want to point a finger at the school and teachers. However, we should be looking at our children and our selves. It is always easy to blame everyone else. When does a teachers responsiblity stop and a parents start?? As far as bullies go, they are everywhere. Every kid has been picked on and every kid has picked on another. No matter what school your child goes to, there will be a bully.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 6, 2006

I think this school really needs some kind of control over the out of control kids. When I have been in this school first of all you sign in and rarely are you ever greeted at the front desk. I have heard teachers talking about students in a very unprofessional manner. I think the teachers dress code deserves a fashion citation some are horrible! What is happening to our schools and the leaders that our children are suppose to be looking up too? How can kids look up to someone that looks like they are an old version of a school kid? From what I see, a lot of the kids may be taking care of themselves before they come to school. I really wish someone would look beyond budgets and quotas and pay attention to what kids really need to encourage their learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2006

My son's academic progress at longfellow was great, but he is a smart kid who learns easily. My son was constantly bullied by kids and ignored by teachers most parents at this school are not involved in their childrens behavior, therefore there are many problematic children. They have music but no performances/recitals, there is little art and science. The level of parental involvement is poor. I have had horrific experiences, please do not send your child to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
65%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
59%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
45%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
40%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
57%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
27%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
42%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students61%
Female54%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income57%
Not low income77%
Special education15%
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students58%
Female54%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income54%
Not low income77%
Special education15%
Not special education66%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Female63%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Low income57%
Not low income72%
Special education0%
Not special education71%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students59%
Female60%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Low income55%
Not low income71%
Special education0%
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students42%
Female45%
Male40%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Low income36%
Not low income64%
Special educationn/a
Not special education48%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students42%
Female38%
Male45%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White42%
Low income33%
Not low income71%
Special educationn/a
Not special education49%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students45%
Female38%
Male52%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Low income35%
Not low income79%
Special educationn/a
Not special education49%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students39%
Female31%
Male45%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White40%
Low income29%
Not low income71%
Special educationn/a
Not special education43%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students45%
Female37%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Low income44%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education51%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students59%
Female59%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Low income56%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education67%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 68% 60%
Two or more races 11% 6%
Hispanic 9% 20%
American Indian/Alaska Native 4% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 7%
Black 3% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 2% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 13%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 284%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 16N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 13N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 79%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Nurse(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching

Language learning

Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Julia Lockwood

Programs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Counseling
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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800 East Providence Ave
Spokane, WA 99207
Phone: (509) 354-3500

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