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GreatSchools Rating

Shadle Park High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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16 reviews of this school


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Posted November 29, 2013

I'm a freshman at Shadle Park. I'm in really challenging classes, that are years above my grade level; like chemistry. Trust me it hasn't been easy juggling four advanced classes, and participating in time consuming afterschool activities; that's is for sure. I chose this crazy combination of classes and activities, and the Shadle Staff has always helped me when I have too much homework; or if there is something I don't understand. I feel like I've learned/grown so much, that it's hard to beleive it's only been a couple months. I Shadle has a really great dedicated staff, and I feel if some students at Shadle would apply themselves more; they would find that Shadle's an awesome school. If they would just stop focusing on the negatives, and start focusing on all the positives. Maybe they would see that all the teachers, and the staff are all there for you.


Posted January 26, 2012

It's obvious some of these reviews are written off of biased opinions. Our student body is not a mess. Our teachers are fine, and kids need to learn how to get their work done and get their help. Anyone who thinks the teachers are bad haven't been there themselves. End of story, I've been well educated, and I PASSED the running start entrance exams flawlessly.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 25, 2011

Terrible School, Terrible Administration, and Terrible Curriculum. Most teachers don't care about student's future or their education. They use "smart" boards to help them spell!!! All colleges in town complain that Shadle is the only school that doesn't support the Running Start and most students can't even pass the entrance test due to the lack of education. The parents' connect online feature although advertised A LOT, doesn't actually work, because teachers are too lazy to post the grades, so you never know where your child is at. Administration doesn't support students or parents. For that beautiful renovated school outside it is very rotten on the inside. I will NEVER send another of my children to Shadle!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 6, 2010

I've been a student here for 3 years now and I love it. My peers are great and the teachers help when needed. The principal is one of the coolest guys i have ever meet.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 11, 2009

The staff and Principal are great. The renovations are going great, and the school is beautiful. I really like this school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 31, 2008

Shadle has been incredible for me. My freshman year was comfortable for me, most of my teachers were great, I love the area. I think the bagpipes and the dancers are cool, it adds to the school spirit. Our dance team and our softball are amazing!
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 27, 2008

Over the past couple of years the school has really been getting bad. Still the teachers are good the student body is a mess
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 12, 2008

I like Shadle, I feel safe at Shadle and the teachers do an excellent job of teaching.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 17, 2008

Students care about the welfare of their peers and their education.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 27, 2007

So far I feel Shadle is doing a good job. The parent connect online review of your childrens progress, is wonderful and so helpful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 9, 2007

My three daughters have attended Shadle Park High School and have had wonderful high school experiences. The majority of the teachers are great and sincerely like teaching and want their students to succeed. The calculus teacher is so devoted that she holds Wednesday night study tables each week. If students want to be involved, there are opportunities in music, dance, drama, DECA, sports, leadership, community volunteering, knowledge bowl, and many more. Shadle provides a great atmosphere for learning and for being involved!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 7, 2007

I agree with Becky, that homework is not easily accessible. Shadle has a problem with trusting the parents. They don't help students and parents yet hinder a lot of them. Rules not applied consistently. Coaches with blind eyes to students they favor. Math a subject most students are flunking. Why? The music program is a good one. Shadle has digressed since I attended and graduated. I was once proud of this school, now I just wonder. I think it needs a complete overhaul.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 18, 2006

I go to Shadle, and it is the best experience I have ever had! The coaches are great, the honors is great, the orchestra is by far the best I have ever seen, and the school spirit is just busting out everywhere. The football season was a blast this year! I would reccomend anyone to come here and join us at Shadle!
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 29, 2006

As a parent of a student on IEP's we have found this school to be nothing but problematic at best. While in Washington State it remains the law that Teacher follow the current IEP and all the accomadations set forth. We have found that the teacher are basically unwilling to follow those guide lines. Also another note would for all students if you are in need of homework help it is difficult to get it. It seem that the school wants kid to arrive before school hours start to receive this help. I wish everyone goodluck with this are findings have been that if the teacher is there they are in meetings or involved with something extra curricular. I will say that the Staff is a real pro at 'side tracking' parents away from the principal and sticking you with someone who glosses over the problem.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2005

The principal at Shadle knows a ton of students on a first name basis and as a Senior this year it meant a lot to have him attend every basketball game I played in. The bag-pipers add something to our school spirit which no other school can match. The honors program at Shadle was really helpful and as a running start student I was prepaired for college a year ahead of schedule. I love the Shadle Park Community and it was an awesome school to attend the last 4 years.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 2, 2004

Shadle is, by far, the best high school in District #81! The teachers are devoted and knowledgable, the students are respectful of differences and ready to learn, and the support staff are friendly and efficient. Thanks!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

227 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
62%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
91%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
92%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
44%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

265 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
61%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

167 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
73%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
58%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students63%
Female64%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic46%
Multiracial50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Low income53%
Not low income75%
Special education64%
Not special education63%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students95%
Female100%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income89%
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female98%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial91%
White99%
Low income97%
Not low income98%
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students29%
Female22%
Male34%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial36%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White26%
Low income24%
Not low income41%
Special education11%
Not special education36%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students71%
Female72%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracial58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low income60%
Not low income84%
Special education41%
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students83%
Female75%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracial58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income75%
Not low income91%
Special education85%
Not special education83%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students23%
Female30%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education25%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students39%
Female46%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income50%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education41%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

347 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

341 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
77%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

362 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
49%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

337 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students82%
Female88%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic83%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income76%
Not low income90%
Special education29%
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students82%
Female92%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic87%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income74%
Not low income90%
Special education43%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 83% 60%
Two or more races 8% 6%
Hispanic 5% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 19%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 245%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 68%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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4327 North Ash St
Spokane, WA 99205
Phone: (509) 354-6700

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