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GreatSchools Rating

Libby Center

Public | 5-8 | 204 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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26 reviews of this school


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Posted May 26, 2011

This is the BEST program hands down! In a regular clasroom my daughter was chastized for reading a book that was too thick. (3rd Grade) Another year the teacher told her she couldn't possibly be bored, not in her class. (5th Grade) When your child is gifted there are so many necessary levels to their education that are crucial to their happiness and productivity as a child and as a future citizen of our society. THANK YOU LIBBY for all your do and the enourmous pride you have in teaching, inspiring, and encouraging our gifted children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2010

I began the Odyssey program at Libby Middle in 7th grade, just about 9 years ago. As a senior in college, I can honestly say that Odyssey was perhaps the most vital factor in my academic success to date. The program reinforced my intellectual curiosity, while it may have languished in other middle schools. From learning fractions in 6th grade, I maxed out of my high school's mathematics as a sophomore. I stood out in high school and I stand out in college on the basis of this outstanding program... despite my "B" in Orchestra!


Posted April 10, 2010

Wow!!! This is an amzing school! The teachers are top notch, everyone gets along like a family, and the advanced academics prepare us for the future. I am in my fourth and final year at Odyssey. I cannot thank my teachers enough for what they have given me. Every year, we do special things at Odyssey like trips to the University of Idaho, Camp Shoshone, and new this year, Chewelah Peak. The last day of school this year will be hard as I will walk out the doors of the school for the last time. I want to personally thank each of my teachers for what they have done to make this school unlike any other in the nation. It was a once in a lifetime opprotunity to go to this school and I will cherish all of the memories that it has given me forever.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 20, 2009

Libby Center is seriously one of the best schools out there. Last year I just finished my forth year in the main program, Odyssey (Grades 5-8), and it was a life-changing experience that I don't think I could ever have again. As the only middle school in the area without actual class periods (you have all the subjects, just not in a 'period' schedule), you stay with the same general class of kids for a couple years in everything and get to build a huge family feeling with everyone there. All of the teachers, whether you realise at the time you have them or not, are amazing at their jobs. They understand the gifted kids who go there, and know exactly how to treat them - willing to even give up their personal time to help them learn and understand. I could go on and on about what a great place Odyssey is, the amazing teachers, or the traditions and spirit everyone has there, but words wouldn't be enough. I am truly happy that I was privileged enough to be part of this wonderful program. Thank you Libby. Thank you Odyssey. Thank you to all of the teachers, students, and parents who have made this place an important part of so many people's lives for over 12 years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2009

Even though I've been out of this school 4 years, I'm still best friends with so many kids that went there. It creates lasting bonds between all of us. It's truly a great place to be. It's not only the kids that are amazing. The teachers not only help you learn a lot, they make it interesting and fun. You actually enjoy learning. If you ever have a problem, you can talk to them and they'll help you, no matter what it's about. Once we go out into 'normal' high schools, we're so far ahead of the normal freshmen, mentally and emotionally. Kids are generally placed in sophomore, if not junior math once they leave Libby. In short, we learn so much. Even the parents of these kids are an amazing, supportive, loving network. Even now, they're supportive. It's ridiculous how much this school rocks.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 20, 2009

With every fiber of my being, I miss attending Tessera at the Libby center. Once a week, I was swept away from normal elementary school to a wonderful safe haven that was Libby center. In Tessera I was always inspired to go above and beyond expectations. I learned to reach out and make friends, to make my opinions known, and to find ways to make learning enjoyable. My teachers were kind and admirable. Without their support I would not be here today. Libby Center has created me, and I am proud of who I am. I seek more than an answer, I seek humanity, justice, and perspective . Thank you Mrs. Mai, and Mrs. Khols, and all the other teachers and staff who helped support me for those 4 years.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 20, 2009

The Libby Center is a wonderful middle school that serves kiddos with one of two special needs. They either have learning disorders or they are gifted learners. The school works extremely hard to make sure that every child gets their needs met! They are working with a population from ages 10 - 14. It is a very hormonal age and with the expectations of parents on top of that they do a phenomenal job!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2009

Libby Center is a school that celebrates individuals. Students learn the required curriculum in a compacted format. Then they are also encouraged to choose topics that interest them. This is their time to go deeper into a personal interest. Libby teachers are highly qualified and well educated. We understand gifted students and help them learn to better understand themselves. I am grateful to work in this unique environment with these truly wonderful students. I am happy and proud to say I am in touch with students from my first year as a teacher at Libby Center. We create a family environment that fosters life-long relationships as well as an academic environment that prepares students for high school and beyond.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 20, 2009

Odyssey at the Libby Center teaches kids to really think. They truly show you how to be yourself, and how to be appreciated for that. Even though I no longer attend Libby, I still feel a sense of community every time I visit. I met my best friends and heroes at this school. I learned so much, not only about math and English and other subjects, but about myself. Libby deserves any funding it can get, because I'd love to see many more kids get the same amazing opportunity I did.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2009

It is just simply the best school ever. I went to this school and am now in my first year of high school. It's like a family at Odyssey, everyone knows each other, no one hates anyone, and everyone will remain friends for a LONG time. Trust me.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 20, 2009

The teachers are the BEST in the world...and it is so small that you get to know everybody (I know kids that have graduated that otherwise I would have never met). It is the BEST!
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 20, 2009

Libby is truly an amazing place. I've just entered my fourth year as a permanent student at the school, and it definitely distinguishes itself as a place that has changed my life in a positive fashion. The teachers are amazing at their jobs and very enthusiastic to help you in anyway they can. Students are truly a family here, and everyone's willing to help each other out. I'm really happy today to say that I had the privilege of going to the Libby Center, and will always cherish the memories that I've collected from these four years.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 20, 2009

This is where you grow up, at Odyssey. People say that High School is the best time of your life, well, they didn't go to middle school with us. I would like to say that they pretty much let us do what we want, but it's only because they taught us not to ask for much. That is an important quality that you have to learn in life. As I am going through my first year of high school, and realizing how little people care here, how much I miss that place will always be on my mind. A place where everyone new your name. There was no room to be a social outcast. Not to mention the fantastic band/orchestra program. I wouldn't have turned out to be the person that I enjoy being if I had attended a 'regular' middle school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2009

There's just no place like Libby. Between the Odyssey and Tessera programs offered there, Libby is a haven for gifted students who would otherwise be suffering from boredom in a regular public school. Aside from providing a challenge to gifted students, the sense of family and community in the students and teachers is unrivaled anywhere else. Without having any sports teams or other extracurriculars besides the band and orchestra, Libby has more true school spirit than any other school in the district.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 19, 2009

The Libby Center, and more specifically, Odyssey, is a life-changing school. It gives gifted kids a chance to come together and meet people like them, people who are different, and feel normal for once. Odyssey is a place where you can really be yourself -- even in middle school -- which is unprecedented, and absolutely appreciated. Thank you, Libby Center. Thank you so much.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 19, 2009

This is my fourth year attending full-time Libby Center. Odyssey is one of the best Learning Programs that I have ever been apart of. The Teachers are magnificent, each having time for necessary one-on-one time. And the other students are a great experience, you are given the privilege to meet people that share the same qualities as you do. Though some say that it is located in a bad neighborhood, it really isn't. Plus the teachers make the classroom feel comfortable, especially Mike Cantlon- 5th/6th/8th grade Teacher, who is the most philosophic man I have ever met!
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 19, 2009

The finest school in the district, with an excellent staff. Some of our family's best memories come from it's halls. I owe them so much!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

I loved Libby Center because it was a great school for kids who were often overlooked in normal public school environments. The Odyssey Program run by the Libby Center, for gifted magnet students, as well as the one-day-a-week Tessera program were amazing ways to spend 4 years of my public schooling. I met great people- friends, teachers, staff- and fostered my education through non-traditional teaching and learning styles provided by the school. The Libby Center also housed a large program for Developmentally Impaired (D.I.) students, or students with disabilities, which offered a great education to those whose learning styles and needs were often overlooked. I cherished my 4-year experience at the Libby Center and wished, upon graduating in eighth grade, that I could stay there for high school as well. The community at Libby Center was much like that of a small private school; everyone knew everyone (even if you were an eighth grader and they were a fifth grader, or even a teacher) and the environment felt continuously supportive nurturing (especially to some of our students' different or even difficult needs). It was the best schooling experience I have had during my educational journey (I am now a freshman in college, attending Gonzaga University in Spokane) and I attribute the majority of my successes, both academic and extracurricular, to the strength, open-mindedness, and caring provided by the Libby Center, including its staff, students, and everyone involved in offering the small group of students there a prestigious public-schooling experience.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 16, 2009

I love Libby Center! I attended the school for six years and going there gave me and the other students the opportunity to learn beyond what our peers outside the school were exposed to. It was a personal environment, designed to focus on the development of each student, and it helped me prepare for higher education better than a conventional school could have.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 16, 2009

Libby Center creates an environment which nourishes and encourages the students more than any other school I have ever attended. The staff is caring and genuine, and there is a great group of kids there. I can honestly say that my education during my time there has provided me with extraordinary opportunities I never would otherwise have gotten. It prepared me for the rigorous studies I now pursue at a 4-year private Jesuit university, and taught me that to constantly challenge myself and the people around me.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students94%
Female95%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income83%
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income100%
Not low income99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students98%
Female97%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income92%
Not low income99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students99%
Female97%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income100%
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Low income100%
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students98%
Female97%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income100%
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students98%
Female100%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female95%
Male100%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Not special education98%

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 90% 63%
Asian 4% 7%
Two or more races 4% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hispanic 1% 18%
Black 0% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 117%N/A40%
Transitional bilingual 20%N/A8%
Special education 20%N/A13%
Source: 1 NCES, 2010-2011
Source: 2 WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

2900 East 1st Ave
Spokane, WA 99202
Phone: (509) 354-7500

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