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GreatSchools Rating

Washington Virtual Academies

Public | K-12 | 2200 students

Best known for our individualized learning plans and award winning curriculum.

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

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34 reviews of this school


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Posted June 23, 2014

My daughter just completed her first year with WAVA. She joined WAVA because she was learning nothing at our local school. Her initial testing showed she was below level. I am pleased to say she completed the year on the honor roll and with above average scores. Granted it was quite a bit of work for me as Learning Coach and registration is a pain, but I like the mastery based system. I will definitely be returning this fall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2014

The registration can be difficult, but I found that this was due primarily to our local school district. My daughter attended WAVA from 4th-12th, graduating this year. She always found the system, requirements, teachers, and administration very easy to deal with. My daughter will be attending The University of Alabama this year. We never had a problem with the curriculum. It should also be noted without the testing WAVA participates in my daughter would never had been accepted into University at all. I would recommend WAVA to everyone I know!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2014

We started our journey with WAVA, almost 5-years ago. Back then it was a good alternative to brick-and-mortar public school. However, over the past 2-years it became more like a traditional public school. Requirements began to change, and they became ridiculously demanding and rigid! Further, I watched in disbelief, while WAVA began to implement Common Core curriculum. This was done on the sly, without ever informing parents. This year, announcements were made that further Common Core requirements and changes to State testing would be implemented - beginning with middle school. This was the last straw, and it was time for us to say good-bye. We will be transitioning to traditional home school, come fall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 23, 2014

If I could give negative 1 star I would. This organization is horrific to deal with even during the enrollment process. I can't imagine what it would be like to enroll as a full time student. After 2 weeks of being on hold forever and never getting full answers to my questions, I withdrew our enrollment for my high schooler. This organization is misleading in saying you have a PAL or personal liason to work with you. They give you a national "PAL" line, and say a name of a consultant for whom you don't get a direct line. When you call, you are on hold for at least a half an hour to try to talk to someone, and when you do talk, it is to whomever answers the phone. They have scripts and are constantly wanting to talk the scripts and are afraid to give you direct lines to supervisors or anyone who has power to actually give answers. I would not recommend K12 or WAVA.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2013

Amazing school, it offers mastery of a subject and then moving forward onto the next learning opportunity. Teachers and parents are very supportive and help each other learn. It provides an chance for our kids to get an excellent education and still follow their dreams without the restriction of schedules. :)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2013

Horrid. I agree with older reviews and we did this the entire 2012/13 school year. We wanted an online school that would teach my child and allow her to obtain a regular high school diploma at the end. She is currently a beginning jr high student. I did not want to homeschool following someone else's strict program with confusing recording, reporting, and even open ended grading required of me (I'm not a teacher!) They said parent supervision/involvement. They did not specify that I'd pretty much need to pretend to be a teacher in my own home as if I had a classroom of students. It was dry material. Boring. Not fluent. No teaching from the teachers. Absolutely a waste! I only hope she got credit for finishing the courses weeks after school was out because they messed up on enrollment, form approvals, lost forms, even refused our vaccination exemptions (we are in our own home!), and she couldn't even begin courses until late October! By then they never helped us catch up. Never adjusted the daily work. By the time I caught it and figured out how to just flipping change the courses assigned per day she had to do 15 plus 1hr assignments per day in order to hope to finish. Burn out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 12, 2012

This is our 2nd year with WAVA. I read some of the reviews below and understand the workload is scary for the learning coach. I have to add though that I felt overwhelmed to begin with. As the year progressed however I realised that my son and I simply needed an organized system. This way we actually finished school a week early last year. He scored well in MSP and he is doing great this year. I am not a qualified teacher or academic person but seriously, if you are committed to your child's future, you can DO THIS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2012

Not an online school, an online administrator. The "Learning Coach" is actually the teacher. Be prepared for many hours of teaching each day with weekends used to prep for the upcoming week. Very little room to deviate from the k12 daily plans. I homeschooled my older children for 13 years and have never been more exhausted then after one week of WAVA with one child. Be prepared to teach five classes a day as well as watch two hours of online gatherings a week. I do not see how a family could do it with more than one child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 1, 2012

This will be our 3rd year with WAVA and we are grateful for the opportunity to have an option to Public School. What a wonderful program! It is a perfect fit for our grandchild (I am his learning coach). The program is very user-friendly and intuitive, and our grandson could not be happier. He is now relaxed and is making wonderful progress. I must also disagree with the comments below, regarding Christianity content. All "Religious" stories have been from a historical aspect and very diverse!


Posted December 23, 2011

I disagree with the comments made about the K12 curriculum being centered on Christianity. My second grader has had lessons as a WAVA student about the history of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism and early polytheistic religions. Whether you're religious or not, bible stories are woven into our modern culture. The lessons are presented only as stories, just as those about the Greek and Roman gods are. Maybe this parent skipped too many lessons or just has a particular sensitivity toward Christianity. WAVA is outstanding and the K12 curriculum is amazing. The workload is INSANE, but as the "learning coach" (teacher) you have the flexibility to decide which activities advance your child's understanding of the subjects and which do not. You do not have to do every activity within every lesson! Teachers will work with you through any struggles you have as long as you are committed to putting forth an honest effort (and that's NOT 2 hrs. per day!) and as long as you communicate. I highly recommend this program!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 7, 2011

WAVA has been a better alternative than putting our son in public schools, however expect heavy workloads in order to meet monthly goals. 5TH grade math can have 30-60 fraction story problems in one daily lesson. Too many!!! 5th Grade math has had many errors in it, especially the adaptive lessons, I have brought this to the attention of K-12, not fair to kids when the lesson is wrong and they give the correct answer and still get it wrong. K-12 must have been written by the Christian Coalition, many many many Bible stories, religion should be kept OUT of public schools!!! I just skip over all these, they have had no other religious stories from other religions, only christian ones so far. Skipped a whole week of bible stories in Lit.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2011

This is our second year with WAVA and it is the best thing we could have done for our child. Homeschool takes a huge amount of commitment from the parent. But it is well worth the effort. Our child has gone from failing in public school to testing off the charts. Just as public school is not for every student, WAVA is not for every child/parent. If you know how to manage your time, establish and reestablish priorities, don't get hung up on the little things then WAVA would be great for you. If not, then I don't recommend it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2011

This was our 3rd year using WAVA and LOVE it!! For those who feel that the classes "take too much time" or are complaining that you have to be the teacher, well, i don't know what you think homeschooling is about, but you ARE the teacher (MOSTLY) and in the younger years especially, you will be the ones teaching the classes. The classes deffinatly are NOT "too long", they are perfect to get the information across to the children. You can't expect a lession in history for a typical kid to be in 5-10 minutes...But you can expect it to take about 30...my 3rd grader gets done with school in about 2-3 hours and my 7th in about 3 hrs a day. We have nothing but good things to say about the curriculum, materials and support. Depending on the year, more or less is online. In the younger years, more is hands on with workpages, and books and as they progress, there is more online interaction and more of the children working more independently but with adult supervison and as a resource for any issues/questions that arrise. I think a lot of people are "lazy" homeschoolers and feel they should be able to get school done in about an hour a day, thats not realistic. This is duable!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2011

This is my second year doing this and I have a 3rd and 5th grader. Although I never planned this for the longterm for my 5th grader, I've found the K12 curriuclum exhausting. For Language Arts, many of the 3rd party books they use are good. But the in-house developed K12 books are burdensome to use for both grades (teacher's guide for composition, grammar, and vocabulary combined into one fat book). Last year I used sinapore math (not k12's) and this year k12 introduced a new math curriculum. This has been time consuming because lessons and tests are online. We've enjoyed the history lessons, but they're often time-consuming, esp. at higher grades. They have teacher support, but IMO it's token and her role is purely administrative.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 27, 2010

The K12 curriculum is amazing, however, each of the year-long courses are crammed into the nine month public school academic year calendar. The progress goals dictated by WAVA are burdensome if you're working with more than one child. The quality of the learning experience is diminished by having to rush through the material in order to keep up with monthly goals. I was misled by the "learning coach" verbiage. These lessons require me to be a full time teacher (40+ hours per week)! There is very little flexibility because we're forced to adhere to the same public school academic calendar as far as weekly attendance. We enrolled in WAVA because we thought saving a few thousand dollars on the K12 curriculum would be worth all the hoop-jumping. It isn't, and we won't be returning to WAVA next year unless they provide a year-round option that makes the pace reasonable.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2010

Our experience with this school was horrendous. It look forever to get enrolled, and we had to re-fax information and wait past the date school started before my child could begin, . After beginning and doing the work, only then did we find out my child's previous school credits would not be accepted. We were not told this upfront so my child had to drop out and we had to rush out and find a home school curriculum at the last minute. It was very stressful and we felt they not only misled us, but took advantage of us. Also, one of the teachers was very hard to reach when my child needed to ask a question. All it all, it took a huge amount of our time, money sending faxes of the loads of paperwork required, and miscommunication with nearly everyone we dealt with, including the school counselor.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2010

WAVA's test scores are not really comparable because part-time students (home schoolers) are not required to take the WASL (now MSP). The state counts those students (even though they are not required to take the test) and gives them a score of zero! Don't trust test score statistics without looking into how they are derived!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 1, 2010

This is a very damaging school at the high school level. We live in a rural area where Internet access is sometimes down. WAVA gave us no means of catching up. My son spent an average of 8.5 hours a day, 6 days a year trying to succeed. Contacting teachers and administrators was always difficult and required hours of phone tag and being placed on hold. At the end of the year my son was about 2 weeks behind and was failed for the entire year. After repeating 9th grade my son had a GPA for the year of 3.40. But his Cumulative GPA was 1.864 due to the lost year at WAVA. This school had no business destroying a year of my child s life. He is still paying for my mistake of putting him in this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 9, 2009

WAVA, is an excellent school for my child. She has more one on one learning time. A much bigger quality social life. Her Lessons are at her personal level of education tailored just for the student. There is no more standing on cold bus stops in the dark morning hours. to get to an over crowded school were you hope your child can learn something ,or even get to finish lunch before loosing there seat in the over crowded lunch room. I wish online public school was an option sooner. It may be the new way to go to school and replace the brick and mortar schools all together.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2009

WAVA is terrific -- and has been an excellent fit both for our twelve-year-old son and for our family. This is our third year of enrollment with WAVA and we've loved all of the teachers we've had for each of those three years -- both for WAVA Middle School and for WAVA High School. The Middle School components we've been most pleased with have been the World History A and B and the fact that each of those courses has been paired with its chronological partner in WAVA/K12's World Art History curriculum. So smart and so natural a pairing -- yet we've not really ever encountered that in a brick and mortar school. Our son also really liked the Physical Science course offered by WAVA Middle School -- and took both Earth Science and Life Science prior to Physical Science.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
40%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
28%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
62%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
31%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
30%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
52%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
16%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
38%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
38%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
51%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
38%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
28%

2010

 
 
21%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
48%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
34%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
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Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
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Native Americann/a
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Not low incomen/a
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Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
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Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
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Native Americann/a
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Whiten/a
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Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 86% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 6% 7%
Hispanic 4% 20%
Black 3% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Two or more races 1% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 14%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 213%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 39N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 76%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • Washington Achievement Award (2012)

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Clubs
  • Science club

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Photography
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
Media arts
  • Computer animation
Clubs
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • French
  • German
  • Latin
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Clubs
  • Foreign language and culture club

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Advanced placement courses
  • Gifted / high performing
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College presentations or information sessions
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mark Christino
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Online or in-person information session
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Special schedule
  • Part-time study
Is there an application process?
  • Yes

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Advanced placement courses
  • Core knowledge
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Virtual school
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • None
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Foreign languages taught
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • French
  • German
  • Latin
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Vocational or skills-based training offered
  • None

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
  • Career/college counseling
  • Mentoring
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College presentations or information sessions
Transportation options
  • None
School facilities
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
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Sports

Boys sports
  • None
Girls sports
  • None

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Photography
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
Media arts
  • Computer animation

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Book/reading club
  • Foreign language and culture club
  • Science club
  • Yearbook
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Neither uniforms nor dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
More from this school
  • Our teachers support at multiple levels including provide support in specific grade levels and subjects, motivation, tutoring, scheduling and instructional advice.
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

This school accepts applications on a

rolling basis

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?

Students typically come from these schools
Brick and Mortar Public School
Homeschool
Private Schools

Planning ahead

College preparation / awareness offered
College presentations or information sessions
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

2601 South 35th Street, Suite 100
Suite 100
Tacoma, WA 98409
Website: Click here
Phone: (877) 900-5602

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