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GreatSchools Rating

Washington High School

Public | 9-12 | 1007 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

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43 reviews of this school


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Posted September 26, 2013

Alright, so putting aside "Patriot Pride" or whatever other buzzwords get plastered on here, this school was decent enough. I recently graduated from WHS as a part-time student there, the rest being spent as a Running Start Student. WHS is NOT by any means a bad school. They have done much to improve their image. It is a fairly safe school and quite honestly had some of the greatest teachers that I have ever met. The 70% rule was fantastic. If you can't do that you better like working a dead-end job because it doesn't get any easier post High School. Now, as I said this WAS a great rule. Now it's just stupid. Students being able to retake tests in order to pass, grade padding with a ridiculous percentage of the final grade being attributed to homework and attendance, it's all just lying really. A student shouldn't be able to skip a test because they can retake it until they pass. Even blind guessing will eventually get them a 70% so whats the point. Why pass unable students through the system? It's not helping anyone. In the end, that's what ruins this school's scores. Not it's "lack of caring teachers" nor it's "passiveness" it's the fact that it's to lazy to fix itself.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 27, 2013

Best teachers! I enjoy everything this school has to offer. The coaches are cool and very inspirational.


Posted November 5, 2012

I love this school ! I'm proud to say that i'm a Patriot! This is honestly the BEST high school ever.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 6, 2011

As a senior at Washington High School and someone who has attended this school since freshmen year I believe our school deserves a much better rating. Our test sores have improved greatly and we have made our school have a family like environment. Everyone from freshmen to seniors show their pride every Friday. We support our football team with huge audiences and we always know how to do things right. Washington High School is an amazing school wit the best teachers out there. They don't come to school everyday just to teach, they build relationships with us and help us be successful in all we want to do. If it wasn't for their amazing encouragement and involvement our school wouldn't be as great as t it, not to mention we have great administrators that actually take part and care about what we do. I love WHS :)
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 23, 2011

I'm currently a senior at WHS and I can say with conviction that it is the best school I've ever been to. Our principle is always out and about, ready to answer questions or encourage us when we need a pick-me-up; the staff is incredibly kind and ready to help anyone at the drop of a hat; my counselor has gotten to know me on a personal level and genuinely cares about my future; and my teachers? Don't get me started! I've never had a teacher at WHS that I haven't liked. I consider many of them to be mentors and role models rather than simple instructors. The teachers at WHS invest in their students personally, and are always there if we have troubles - inside OR outside of school. Though it's corny, a few of my teachers have helped shape the person I am today. There are those rare "inspirational" teachers who stick with you long after you graduate. Our school climate is awesome. For the most part, everyone respects and loves one another. I have never felt unsafe or threatened at WHS, and we have a zero-tolerance stance on bullying. There are tons of different clubs, we have monthly homework help and study sessions, and no one is excluded. Everyone has a place at WHS!
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 23, 2011

Best school EVER! Honestly, i've gone here 3 years, and it's been the best 3 years of my life. The leadership program continues to get stronger and the school continues to get better! Love all the teachers and everyone is SUPER Friendly. Also, there is an overload of pride and spirit at this school. Gotta love that PATRIOT PRIDE! I <3 WHS :)
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 16, 2010

I go to this school right now as a freshmand. Its okayy but people are so passive. But there is a lot of school spirit so i guess thats cool. The teachers are really cool and there is a lot of freedom in the class room. But maybe too much freedom. Its not a bad school but honestly it depends on the type of person that you are in order to like it. :)
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 8, 2010

I love Washington High School. I have been there all four years and I wouldn't change it for anything. The teachers and students of WHS are all accepting of everyone. There is never bullying here and there aren't even cliques. We all hang out with each other and every kid there has school spirit, whether they show it or not. Many students have transfered from Franklin Pierce and every one I've had the opportunity to talk to have ALL said that WHS is much more relaxed and much more fun. And everyone who transfers from WHS to FP always transfer back. We have a reputation of being a bad school, but that's only because we're small. I love my school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 29, 2009

I personally think that naming WHS 'Washington High School' was a big mistake. If it was named 'Parkland High School' it would give the school and town so much more pride and WHS would no longer be the high school in Tacoma that people always ask, 'Where's that?'. Names can really help identify a school and associate it with the town it represents. Parkland has a lot to offer especially with PLU right in the heart of town. Such a great university that really should give our town a superb image. Parkland could revolve around WHS if only the community would support the school more! WHS has a lot of great students, teachers, and staff and a small town feel. If only everyone would embrace WHS more instead of always pointing out the negative aspects they would see how diverse of a school it is and it's potential.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 18, 2009

it is a great school... for students to successed in life.. the teachers are great in different ways.....
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 16, 2009

I like that the teacher are always available to discuss how my child is doing in their class and at the school in general. The staff is helpful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2009

Washington High School is a wonderful school, despite all of the negative reviews its recieving. I really don't think parents have a right to rate this school, after all, they aren't the ones ATTENDING it. How do they know what the teachers are like? How do they know what the classes are like? How do they know how students interact? They DON'T. I'm a student at WHS and I have to say---I love it. I have the best teachers who actually take the time to help me understand the material. They also care about my well-being. My classes are interesting. My classmates (for the most part) are respectful. Sure, there are some idiots, but that isn't a reflection of the school itself; you're going to find idiots everywhere. WHS is a great school, but I guess if you don't want your kids to have great, caring teachers, don't send them here.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 27, 2009

Most people just look at the negitive neds of the school but why dont they take out the time to look at the true patriots and the great things about this school. they have great support team and great spirit!!!!!! Go Pats!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 23, 2009

i definetly give this a five star because my daughter learns so much. my son said he feels very safe here.


Posted November 19, 2008

I love this school absolutely friendly no 'cliques' Everyone is accepted here
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 21, 2008

I love attending washington! I am sad that this is my senior year! All of the faculty put our best intrests at heart and help us succeed!
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 3, 2008

Wonderful school! I really feel like my child's best interest is taken into consideration. The teachers really seem to care, and my child is happy to learn! The test scores are climbing by large increments every year, so they must be moving foward and not looking back!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 14, 2008

Horrible school. Poor teachers that don't know how to motivate their students, as shown by the test scores. Poor security as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2008

I am a former part time student of WHS, and it was a wonderful experience for me. I found the teachers and staff to be very nice and helpful. All I had to do was ask and they would set up a time for me to come in and get help if I needed. I would often go in before my classes just to talk with the librarians. It is a very diverse school, with students from many different backgrounds. It is not one for good sports, and I think that their portfolio thing is ridiculous. WHS has its problems, but so does every school. I found no problem keeping up my grades. The kids that had problems were the ones who were talking or texting in class and who did not take advantage of asking for help after school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 26, 2008

I am a former student from the class of 2005. I also have a sister who became a freshman when I became a senior. From my experiences with making visits to the school after graduation and while I attended the school I can say that it is simply not up to par. Most of the teachers have little or no passion in what they teach and drama runs rampant throughout the school. The only school organizations that gets any praise or funding is the Cheer squad and the Football team which both perform poorly for the amount of attention they recive. Now as for the 70% rule, its average, simply said if a student finds that too hard to acheive then the student isnt trying hard enough or the staff dosent recognize a mentally challenged student.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
43%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
98%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
82%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
31%

2011

 
 
38%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

192 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
44%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
21%

2011

 
 
40%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
24%

2011

 
 
25%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

10 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
10%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
23%

2011

 
 
28%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students37%
Female30%
Male44%
Black40%
Asian62%
Asian/Pacific Islander44%
Hispanic28%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander25%
White40%
Low income39%
Not low income32%
Special educationn/a
Not special education37%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students90%
Female90%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic90%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income84%
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students78%
Female80%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White85%
Low income69%
Not low income100%
Not special education83%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students19%
Female21%
Male16%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander31%
Hispanic10%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander40%
White23%
Low income20%
Not low income17%
Special education12%
Not special education20%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students44%
Female45%
Male43%
Black27%
Asian47%
Asian/Pacific Islander45%
Hispanic30%
Multiracial38%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander43%
White62%
Low income38%
Not low income62%
Special education13%
Not special education48%
Limited English27%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students48%
Female53%
Male43%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander50%
Hispanic46%
Multiracial50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander47%
White54%
Low income45%
Not low income58%
Special educationn/a
Not special education50%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students22%
Female20%
Male23%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White25%
Low income25%
Not low income16%
Special educationn/a
Not special education23%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students10%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students25%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income27%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education29%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

233 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
26%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

240 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

238 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
27%

2010

 
 
28%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

238 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students86%
Female85%
Male87%
Black76%
Asian89%
Asian/Pacific Islander93%
Hispanic77%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander96%
White92%
Low income82%
Not low income96%
Special education64%
Not special education89%
Limited English70%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students83%
Female87%
Male79%
Black71%
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander91%
Hispanic79%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander92%
White86%
Low income80%
Not low income91%
Special education68%
Not special education85%
Limited English70%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 40% 60%
Black 16% 5%
Hispanic 15% 20%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 12% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 9% 7%
Two or more races 8% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 18%N/A8%
Special education 112%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 263%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 9N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 66%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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12420 Ainsworth Ave South
Tacoma, WA 98444
Phone: (253) 298-3000

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