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GreatSchools Rating

Curtis Senior High School

Public | 10-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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25 reviews of this school


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Posted May 12, 2014

I am rating this school district as a whole in stead of this high school. In fact this high school is a victim of failed policy engineered by the school district to fail elite students. This school district is located in the most elite student population in South Sound. The quality of the students is similar to that of Bellevue school district. The school district's policy is amazingly good at holding back elite students. If your kid is exceptionally good at math or science, the district is not helping. They will ask you to go to private school instead without even looking at their failed policy. Their graduation raking is by pure GPA which means if a student takes all very easy classes and get 4.0, that student will be honored as academically top student. The school district just doesn't encourage student to take advanced classes with this failed policy. Do not send your kids there. This school district is a joke.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2014

All three of my children went through Curtis HS. My two daughters excelled at sports, while my son did not participate in athletics. Athletics at Curtis was very well run and they had great coaches. Mathematics however was horrible. The teachers did not teach lessons well and then would be unavailable for questions to clarify the lessons for the kids. Many times throughout the year, long standing Curtis HS math teachers would be gone and replaced by substitutes, severely disrupting any possible continuity in teaching plans. TCurtis was trying out Integrative math at the time my kids went through, which completely neutralized the parents in trying to assist their kids in learning math. In turn, out kids were ver unprepared for college level math, with two requiring remedial level college math (sub-100 level). I think the schools scores in math related subject confirm this, when Curtis is compared to the other schools in WA state. What is needed is for Curtis to get serious about providing an education to our children, including looking at replacing some of these teachers that do not have a clue on how to teach, and replace them with new teachers with the desire to teach.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2013

i graduated several years ago. there is a lot of cliques among students and rude/obnoxious kids who bully easy targets while others are indifferent to just sit and watch without telling the teachers. I don't know about now but back then they only offered basic classes and I didn't think much of it then until i found out some of other high schools offer design, computer science and even accounting class I give one star because some staffs in administration office were nice and attentive to what students had to say.


Posted April 5, 2013

Now that i'm graduated from an university with people from diverse backgrounds I have doubts about what people in Pierce county had to say about CHS as a academically thriving school. well i think it's because it's surrounded by even worst ones in tacoma and lakewood. I found many CHS grads incompetent once they advance into 4-year universities and lag behind others from different schools. CHS puts too much emphasis on athletics and makes those who aren't involved in sports feel like an outcast. Don't send your kids here. There are much better high schools out there in Bellevue and Issaquah school districts.


Posted October 10, 2010

School provides many good opportunities in academics, music, theater, and sports. Some superb teachers, a few disasters, most very good. District superintendent Patti Banks caves to bigots and has an adversarial stance in dealing with parents; needs to be replaced.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 7, 2010

I currently attend cHS, coming from lakes. I have to say that curtis is a greay school. the teachers are outstanding and they teach so that you can understand what is being taught. Curtis is a harder school than lakes but the more complicated the work, the more your student will be prepared for college. CHS is wonderful and I recommend it to any parent who wants their child to graduate from high school with the best education offered from any public school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 5, 2009

Great, school. Great teachers, great curriculum and a great neighborhood.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2009

1. There is never one way to learn anything, because ultimately it is up to the student to study and learn the material, not have it spoon-fed by a teacher. 2. Cliques are a part of every high-school and I don't think they are overly prevalent at Curtis. If you just be yourself and stop worrying about what everybody else thinks, you will meet plenty of fun and interesting people. 3. If you take challenging classes such as AP and Honors, the coursework is harder, yes, but it is also more enjoyable and intriguing. 4. My family is not extremely wealthy and I do as well as, if not better than, my 'rich' peers. 5. The reason successful kids thrive here, is because they get involved, meet people, and want to improve. The students that do not, are those that complain about bad grades and then go home and play video games all night.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 17, 2008

I am currently attending CHS, and I have previously gone to Lakes High. The academics at Curtis are rigid, and embrace one style of learning, and have very little use for students who learn differently than this. At Lakes, it was easier to learn what was being taught, and the styles of teaching varied more. The social aspect of CHS is also more inflexible. There doesn't appear to be as many cliques as Lakes, but once you become immersed in the actual school setting, you realize that the dynamics of cliques at CHS are more invisible to the outside eye, however, more complicated and hurtful. I very much dislike Curtis and cannot wait to graduate.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 3, 2008

alright ill just be simple about it, I went to curtis graduated in 07 and loved every second of it. The students hated the teachers because they tried to get their best potential out and teachers got the worst of it, for doing their job. I mean i was a 3 year sport player and got mad at them, but they were doing their job everyday. I now thank them very much because they got me to college and now im going to georgia this next year with baseball. They do whatever they need to do to prepare students and when some kids get in trouble they tell parents different stories. Plain and simple they are 5 stars easy
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 27, 2008

This school needs to rethink many of the teachers. If a teacher has to quit the day before school starts there has to me something wrong underneath. The school board only cares about parents with money, who know nothing about a topic they are 'in charge' of. On the flip side, there are great parents and great teachers who really inspire and make you want to learn.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 12, 2008

Curtis is an interesting high school. Because the surrounding districts are so poor in academic achievement, Curtis appears to be quite stellar. The teachers believe they are outstanding. They are not. What makes Curtis a successful school is that highly educated and motivated parents on the most part send highly motivated and prepared children. Teaching these kids is easy. Now if you have a child with learning problems or a 5014- or needs special help with scheduling- forget it. If you have a racial issue- forget it. The administration and staff at Curtis are just interested in the successful kids. Luckily, I had successful kids go through Curtis, but I felt that a lot of kids got cheated.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2008

I loved Curtis because it offered me AP classes that my private school refused to enroll me in. The education was much better, putting a lot of focus on teaching students how to prepare for careers and college. Howver, I was disappointed that they had issues of racial tension (homecoming theme), therefore, I only give them a 4-star rating.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 19, 2008

I went there and it was the worst time of my life. The teachers look down on the students and the students hate the teacher. Most of the teachers thinkthat they are the end all and be all of the teaching wold and do not care about the kids. Do not send your kid there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2008

Curtis Senior High School, i have to admit that this school is really good in the academics department. My son wen to Curtis for at least 2 months and he didn't like it because of the changes in the curriculum. It was a surprise to see my son, a straight A student get B's and D's and C's. I don't know it depends on the person who can adapt well to a new school. All i have to say that Curtis is a good school if and only if you have been into the district before.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2008

Its funny back in the 80's/90's you could pick the teachers out from the students now days its hard to, Curtis has so many cliques, and ungreatful students and PARENTS. They sure know how to cover up messes with their star athletes. In a nutshell 'If you dont drive a nice car you wont fit in here' that should be there slogan, i worked here and saw the same things as when i went here. things never change.


Posted November 27, 2007

I am a very satisfied parent. I have had four children go through Curtis Sr. High School. All four have been thoroughly prepared for their life after high school. Because of their great education, many doors have been open to them that would otherwise not have been. This school has the best administration around. Each student has many opportunities to shine if they choose to. Great school spirit. Submitted by a parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 13, 2007

I went to Curtis 21 years ago. My son went there too. Unfortunately, I find the same problems as in 1986. The school is very elitist and only there for kids with money. They focus on athletics and literally do not put effort into helping kids that need academic scholarships. I was told point blank by more than one counselor and admin staff that my son could not apply for a particular scholarship because there was too much paperwork involved and they didn't have the time! Curtis even turned down the opportunity to be a Gates funded school! This eliminated numerous more scholarship opportunities. Disappointing. Many of the staff are still there from 1986. I received zero help towards college from Curtis counselors and my son experienced the same. My son carries a 3.5 GPA and is well liked. I enrolled him in Foss and he is very happy.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted October 23, 2006

Academic programs are tailored with college entrance in mind. This is as it should be with all high schools. Unfortunately, programs or classes do not consider students that inadvertently fell behind in late junior high or early high school. Accelerated students should not be held up waiting for others to catch up, and struggling students should not be expected to keep up with accelerated students. Grading students in both categories attending the same class must be extremely difficult.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 4, 2006

This school is taking a step backdwards with the change to a daily 6 period schedule. Elective offerings are diminishing.Record numbers of students are opting for running start due to this fact. District leadership is questionable due to the turnover of Principals accross the district especially at the High School in recent years. The current Principal was hired 1 year ago as an associate and has only 2 years High school admin. experience and only 1 year teaching at the high school level. Choosing this person was a very closed process. The vice principal in charge of discipline is a retire rehire who is very weak at his job. Excellent faculty and athletics.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

450 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
45%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

447 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

464 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
54%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

438 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students90%
Female94%
Male88%
Black68%
Asian91%
Asian/Pacific Islander89%
Hispanic96%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income87%
Not low income92%
Special education57%
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students95%
Female96%
Male94%
Black90%
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander96%
Hispanic94%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income93%
Not low income96%
Special education78%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
14%

2011

 
 
27%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

377 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
74%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

143 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
56%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
8%

2011

 
 
47%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
56%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
21%

2011

 
 
45%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
9%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students20%
Female26%
Male13%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic8%
Multiracial11%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White23%
Low income21%
Not low income18%
Special education3%
Not special education28%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students75%
Female74%
Male76%
Black51%
Asian65%
Asian/Pacific Islander63%
Hispanic78%
Multiracial76%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low income63%
Not low income82%
Special education45%
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students60%
Female61%
Male59%
Black47%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander55%
Hispanic56%
Multiracial48%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income55%
Not low income64%
Special educationn/a
Not special education62%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students20%
Female25%
Male14%
Black18%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White20%
Low income22%
Not low income17%
Special educationn/a
Not special education21%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students21%
Femalen/a
Male27%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low income0%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education27%
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students18%
Female22%
Male14%
Black12%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White19%
Low income16%
Not low income22%
Special educationn/a
Not special education19%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Students9%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education0%
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 56% 60%
Two or more races 13% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 11% 7%
Black 10% 5%
Hispanic 9% 20%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 110%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 231%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 13N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 69%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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8425 40th West
University Place, WA 98466
Phone: (253) 566-5710

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