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GreatSchools Rating

Vancouver School of Arts and Academics

Public | 6-12 | 90 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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33 reviews of this school


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Posted July 28, 2008

VSAA does have an unfair advantage, compared to other middle and high schools, because they get to select their students. Most of the students attending have a positive attitude toward school and a general sense of curiosity and open-mindedness rather than 'artistic' talent. There are some extraordinary students here though. I have never had a communication problem with teachers: ever. There is a positive vibe coming off of the students and the faculty at functions and from the stories I hear from my middle schooler about the classroom. Our daughter was a little intimidated sharing a class with older classmates (some courses blend across grades) in the beginning; however, she had to fend for herself and worked hard to challenge herself. I believe that if your child has the frame of mind right for this school it can be nothing but a blessing!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 11, 2008

VSAA is not a huge dissapointment... we only pay a small fee- 92 dollars- for ASB- other schools pay more. Plus, with the exception of one teacher, the staff is great! How else would they get such high test scores? And teachers must dislike this person, because they continously respond to e-mails and voicemails. Some even give home contact info if you have a concern and can't reach them at school. We have never had a teacher ignore an e-mail or phone call.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2008

Even though I could only attend this school for one year, my sixth grade year, I was extremely grateful to have the opportunity. The teachers are great and challenging. When I thought I did well...I knew I had to do better. I was glad for the arts and I learned plenty. I wish I was there, with the other respectful students.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 23, 2008

Wonderful school! My daughter and her friends love it! Everyone there (well, almost everyone!) Is kind, talented, and smart!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 10, 2007

This school has changed my life. There are no cliques and everyone is kind. I highly reccommend it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 20, 2007

I have gone to VSAA for quite a while now, and its amazing. Every teacher I have had has made me feel like it really matters what I do and what grades I get. I feel incredibly lucky to go to such a school. I know 100's of people who would kill to go to this school. I'm just glad I got in. :)
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 12, 2007

My daughter is graduating from VSAA this year after attending all 7 grades. It has been a wonderful experience for her and for us - her parents. Wonderful talent is found in this school witnessed at the various shows and concerts. My daughter joined in and took part in anything and everything available to her and as a result has grown into quite a young lady with a lot of self confidence. I've had great teacher communication when it was needed. My daughter had the same advocate all 7 years and that person has truly been a blessing in her life. The school has changed a lot over the time she has attended and even though changes aren't always welcomed and are hard to accept, things have always turned out well. With the new principal this year, I expect nothing but success in the years to follow! Sincerely, J. Delgado
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2007

This school is great they have guest arts every Monday and great teachers. Its a small school so you get a lot of one on one time with the teachers if you need help with a project. It's a great school and I feel lucky to go.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 19, 2006

This is an amazing school, and when open to it, it will influence your life. I was able to attend it for the last three years, and am very grateful for this blessing in my life. Academics are challenging, and although sometimes they can be overwhelming, they challenge students, giving them a chance to grow. The Arts are fabulous, allowing students to progress to Focus. It is a place for people who love the arts, whose life would not be complete without them. This is a great school that I hold close to my heart.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 30, 2006

While one of the 'safest' schools here, VSAA is lacking in many areas. Academics are poor in most cases. Arts, of course are well tended to, but the fees to attend this public school are atrocious for what the parent/student don't get. I don't believe that at an arts school, after forking over bundles of money at the start of the year, we're still having to pay to see concerts and shows, and still can't videotape them, even in an emergency situation. Pretty sad. Teacher/parent communication is lousy. They all claim they have email, but I have had only one in three years answer my concerns, either via email or phone. Our child is leaving this year, and we're breathing a sigh of relief. This is NOT the school we thought it would be. VSAA is a huge disapointment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 7, 2006

VSAA is an awesome middle/high school with excellent academic and art programs. It doesn't have the tradition high school atmosphere; It has less than 600 kids, most of which are middle schoolers. The size of the school restricts some things, especially electives. The types and numbers of classes depends heavily on participation and interest. So those students looking to continue further in Foreign Language or specific AP or arts classes may find that they need to look to other schools for suppementation from other schools before class.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 27, 2005

This school has changed my daughter so much over the last 6 years she has attended. The focus and dedication among the students is excellent, even more so among the teachers. I have found passionate men and women who genuinly care about the students. Of course, no school is perfect, but I sincerely can't think of any complaints geared towards VSAA.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 19, 2004

I recently completed my student teaching internship in dance at this empowering school! The VSAA teachers are engaged and constantly seeking new ways to interact as well as encouraging students to follow through with new ideas. Each student has a faculty 'advocate' who monitors their experience throughout their years. The school feels like a community, as sixth graders through twelfth grade students rely on, create beside, and experience together. While at VSAA, a typical student uses their artistic experience to continue deepening their understanding of concepts. A true integration of the art forms occurs within one another and core curriculum creates an environment that has really potent affects on a child's experience. The school is public, yet a magnet, which offers a diverse population relative to Vancouver, WA. Furthermore, many students find a way to constuctively express themselves in a way that would not be as accepted in a traditional setting.
—Submitted by a staff


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
88%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students84%
Female84%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic90%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income85%
Not low income84%
Special educationn/a
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students93%
Female95%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income90%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students93%
Female93%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income88%
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students93%
Female98%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income82%
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students91%
Female98%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income88%
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students81%
Female83%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income65%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education83%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Female91%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income75%
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students86%
Female85%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income80%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

15 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
92%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
100%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
97%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
96%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students78%
Female77%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income78%
Not low income79%
Special educationn/a
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students97%
Female95%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White96%
Low incomen/a
Not low income96%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students92%
Female92%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income90%
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

73 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
75%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

78 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
80%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students99%
Female100%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income100%
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 79% 60%
Hispanic 9% 20%
Two or more races 6% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 11%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 222%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 16N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 78%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Dance teacher(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Dance teacher(s)
Performing and written arts
  • Dance

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Dance teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • James O'Banion

Programs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Vocational education

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Dance teacher(s)
Transportation options
  • School shares bus/van with other schools
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Swimming
  • Track

Arts & music

Performing arts
  • Dance
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

School culture

Parent involvement
  • Chaperone school trips
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3101 Main St
Vancouver, WA 98663
Phone: (360) 313-4600

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