Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Vancouver School of Arts and Academics

Public | 6-12 | 90 students

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

33 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted January 31, 2014

My school is Gaiser middle school I really want to go to vsaa because I love sports and singing and dancing


Posted June 10, 2013

Great school but flawed entrance process. School is filled with top students so test scores reflect. School has about 75% female to 25% male. Entrance should be based on scholastic achievement to get into a lottery based versus hand picked by the principal. Example have a minimum criteria then take the pool of applicants that meet the criteria and have a lottery system. I had a daughter miss an entrance and helped a neighbor get there daughter into VSAA. I also requested entrance info that the principal should post publicly but you have to ask. This info contains elementary schools in the VSD and how many children applied and were accepted. These numbers are very powerful and are available only on request.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2013

to the weirdo who gave this one star, they pick by grades and then by available spots. they dont have sports, but they can compete for any school in the distirct if they want to do sports, so yeah. great school.


Posted February 23, 2013

this is for the person who says i dont believe this school should be aloud to"rate children" why are you rating this school! you obviously haven't been to this school beforethis is my first year here and i absoloutly love it we exept every body and we're aloud to be ourselves around anybody and maybe its because of this thatwe have some of the best teachers and test scores in the whole district we love and exept everybody but i do feel bad for the children whos spot was taken by someonewithout a passion for the arts but this school isn't intended to create the next wave of artists its indended to broaden the learning of children and to create understanding and respect for diffrent cultures and music and art so its not about talent its more about passion for trying new things and wanting to learn more about the arts and ist because of this schoolthat i have a music scholarship for orchestra ths school is the best thing that happened to me


Posted April 14, 2012

Its a sham. I don't believe this school should be allowed to rate children. Lots of very dissapointed children , which I understand is how life is... But most the of the children that we know who made it in dont even care fir the arts. Infact, one of them complained because he was being "made" to go by his parents & they have no sports!! Where as my neighbors child who loves the arts couldnt get in. I dont know how they pick and choose their students, but it deffinetely isnt based on passion for arts or even talent. Its ridiculous! Anyone who recommends this school is a parent whos kid "got in" for "who knows" what reason? Sorry but I really do think it should be based on "talent" to get in. As for the neighbor boy...I feel AWFUL for him. :( Hes not interested in the arts...he wants sports... but his parents are forcing him to go. Very well played VSAA. I love how you "seem" to know who fits in your school & who doesnt. Bravo!


Posted December 6, 2011

I have gone to VSAA for 2 year. i used to be bullied and picked on because i was a dancer. VSAA is a whole different environment. they welcome everyone no matter who you are. For me getting here is one of the best things that ever happened to me.


Posted February 10, 2011

VSAA has proven to be the most amazing place for my child. For the first time he really fits in and loves learning. The integrated curriculum is a huge factor in this. He has been challenged to do things outside of his comfort zone and come out more confident . The staff really cares about the kids and work above and beyond to make sure every child, regardless of their learning style, has a chance to succeed. I would suggest this school but caution that the child needs to have a unique passion for the arts. It is not dependent on talent but passion. I also love how involved the parents are. This school has a very clear sense of community. I would imagine it is an ideal model for other schools to follow.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2010

This is a wonderful school. Art emphasis is beautiful to see in action and test scores prove the effectiveness of the art integrated education. However, there is only one counselor for over 500 children. She does her best but it is not enough and this causes people who transfer in and those going on to college to have trouble with credits. The lack of any sports program is also an issue. No sports at all, nada. Dance is great but its not sports. The girl to boy ratio is high, up to 4 girls to 1 boy. Sometimes this is fine, other times it is not balanced. Ethnic diversity is minimal but it is Vancouver WA after all. Mr. Carr and Mr. Freeman are awesome.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

I love this school because it teaches students to appreciate the arts as well as academics.


Posted April 21, 2010

Because the arts are an integral part of our growth as individuals and as a culture. Here they excell at the arts!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2010

VSAA it is the 2nd best art school in the US and people from England and Canada try to get in. We think students learn best when arts and academics are integrated. Vancouver School of Arts and Academics are for middle and high schoolers, 6-12 and is no ordinary school. We have Visual Art, Band, Orchestra, Vocal, Literary Arts, Moving Image Arts, Dance, and Theatre. We also have all of the classes a normal middle school has.


Posted March 30, 2010

VSAA is the perfect school...the only thing they need improve on is sharing their model for success with more students and other schools. VanSD, why not open another Arts Magnet so that you can serve even more students this way?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2010

Oldest child went to VSAA all 7 years, youngest just got in for HS. This is, by far, a great school. Teachers care. Students in general want to be there. My youngest looks forward to school and is very involved. If you can get in, do it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2010

The BEST school ever! They make it fun to learn and mix in art all the time, not to mention I've never been to a school with such great kids that are funny, artistic, and always nice!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 24, 2009

I loved this school so much when I went there. This school is amazing. Everyone is so accepting. You can express as much of yourself as possible and you won't get ridiculed. Its amazing how accepting everyone was at that school. After I left VSAA I went to a regular high school, and disliked it there so much. I wish I could finish high school at VSAA, but my life changed and so I couldn't. Parents, your child will love it here. And students, trust me, this school is worth going to even If you aren't interested in the arts.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 16, 2009

My daughter looks forward to school every day. What a blessing!! VSAA is a perfect match for her and she is thriving there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 21, 2009

I attended the VSAA for a year and a half. What a privilege. Unfortunately, I was too young to recognize the opportunity and got myself expelled. Great school full of great teachers. I highly recommend this school, whether you're interested in the arts or not. You'll leave with an appreciation for all of them.


Posted July 16, 2009

I have been at VSAA for the pst two years and plan on saying for all seven. VSAA is great, but it has to be the right fit for you. You have to love arts. Although we are the Vancouver School Of arts AND ACADEMICS! You need to love Acdenics too. we hav a whole class were we use academics to infulence art and the school has this class. every year. It's called core and, well, it's the core of the school. I love VSAA and I wish it was the right fit for everyone, but its not. think hard befor you try out. or else you wasting space for people who want to go.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 13, 2009

I gotta say i miss VSAA. I went to the school for my middle school years 6-8 and it was the TIME of my life!! I LOVED going to VSAA instead of your average middle school. VSAA was special and I'm pretty positive that i wouldn't nearly be as happy if i went to middle school somewhere else. Anyhow during my 8th grade year before i knew i was going to move, i was actually contemplating whether i should pursue high school at VSAA. I wasn't INTO arts as much as my 6th grade year so i realized (darn!) i wanted to see what was out there besides arts. VSAA is a good Art school and a loving, accepting community - but you may be a someone that chooses to go only to middle school at VSAA because your interests might change before attending high school, i know mine did.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 3, 2008

Great school with super friendly and involved teachers and admistrative staff. My daughter really enjoyed bring a student at VSAA.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
88%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students84%
Female84%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic90%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income85%
Not low income84%
Special educationn/a
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students93%
Female95%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income90%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students93%
Female93%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income88%
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students93%
Female98%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income82%
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students91%
Female98%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income88%
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students81%
Female83%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income65%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education83%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Female91%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income75%
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students86%
Female85%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income80%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

15 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
92%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
100%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
97%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
96%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students78%
Female77%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income78%
Not low income79%
Special educationn/a
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students97%
Female95%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White96%
Low incomen/a
Not low income96%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students92%
Female92%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income90%
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

73 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
75%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

78 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
80%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students99%
Female100%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income100%
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 79% 60%
Hispanic 9% 20%
Two or more races 6% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 11%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 222%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 16N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 78%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Dance teacher(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Dance teacher(s)
Performing and written arts
  • Dance

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Dance teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • James O'Banion

Programs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Vocational education

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Dance teacher(s)
Transportation options
  • School shares bus/van with other schools
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Swimming
  • Track

Arts & music

Performing arts
  • Dance
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

School culture

Parent involvement
  • Chaperone school trips
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3101 Main St
Vancouver, WA 98663
Phone: (360) 313-4600

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools







ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT