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GreatSchools Rating

Skyview High School

Public | 9-12 | 1946 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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24 reviews of this school


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Posted June 1, 2014

For all you people who are "hating" on Skyview because of how the school functions because of the cliques and the racism, you all must be living in a fairytale world because clearly you live in a utopian society. Every school, elementary to colleges is not perfect. You will find examples of this everywhere, in movies, literature, songs, etc. If your child/you can not handle this I suggest homeschooling. As for the education I believe it is very adequate. From an upper to "average" income area, Skyview has a wide range of opportunities to offer your child. The SMT program is widely recognized by colleges and the sports programs are wonderful and take home lots of medals. As a student going to Skyview I am proud to represent my school and I hope that you will give us a chance
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 14, 2011

Don't send your kids to Skyview unless they thrive in an atmosphere of overcrowded hallways, over-burdened teachers, and large classrooms where students get very little personal attention from teachers. My daughter will have attended all 4 years of high school here. The school refuses to put a cap on enrollment and there are major over-crowding issues. If I had it to do over, I would send my daughter to River. Teachers and advisors are massively over-burdened and you'll get very little feedback from them. Same goes for your student. Just a warning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2011

The cliques at Skyview are an important part of the education. Even the staff, from principals and VPs to teachers and band-aides support the dominant clique. If you happen to fit in every way, you'll thrive. Learn to fit in and bow to the powerful. Who cares about a kid who is different in some way? I'd give a more direct scathing review, but a kid is still there, eagerly awaiting a change.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2011

Skyview is an awesome school. Yes, it lacks diversity, and it may be starting to believe it's own hype that it is a "rich kids" school, but at the heart it is a great middle class school with a ton of tolerance. It can't help being mostly white. It is what it is. I like that it is has student leadership in the area of gay representation and my kid (who is not white) feels safe and appreciated there. If they stay true to their educational roots and not let xtra carriculars get in the way- they will remain the best High School in town.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2010

Honestly, I hate Skyview. They are all clique-ish and its a school full of barbies and kens. The school's money is focused on sports and none of it really goes to anything that contributes to education. Most of the kids at the school are racist and wealthy and look down on people that aren't at the same level as them. The administrators don't inforce the rules of the dress code. All the boys have pants that hang below their bottoms and the girls wear tops that revel it all (including skirts and shorts). I can't wait to get out of the school because it is so fake and a joke. Do yourself / your kid a favor and pick a different school!
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 23, 2010

personally, i love this school. it has tons of extra curricular activities, and good teachers. Although, it's hard to focus sometimes because of the no-walls situation. Other than that it's good!
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 4, 2010

the curriculum is very basic and the school focuses mostly on sports. If you pursue sports, its a great school to attend. If you want a good highschool education, i really do not recommend it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 28, 2009

i am currently a Freshman, and i love it at Skyview. i really like the no-walls thing, even though a lot of people dont. i think the teachers are great, but some students arent as nice as they should be. i'm asian, and i've gotten a little bit of racism, but overall, it's pretty good.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 6, 2009

I am now on my third son graduating from this school. I have to admit, I have had a few problems with a couple of teachers and inappropriate language topics as well as the last counselor almost costing our son his graduation day, but after all is said and done, I love the student body that attend here which says a lot about the parents who raise them. I still feel and always will that this is a truly inspiring school who does seem to care about what parents think and if students make it to the end.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 25, 2008

It's a nice school. Color war is a blast, and they try for fun things in between. I wouldn't go crazy over it. It's a typical American High School. But aside from that, people are nice nad teachers are friendly. The having no walls factor really SUCKS though. But it's great.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 27, 2007

My daughter has attended Skyview Highschool for two years. She is currently in her Sophomore year and is taking pre AP courses to prep her for AP classes during her Junior / Senior years. Skyview has an excellent curriculum and the atmosphere/culture of the students is among the best I've ever dreamed to have my children be a part of. Unfortunately we are moving this summer out of state to California. My biggest fear is that my daughter won't have the supreme support there as she has at Skyview.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 27, 2007

I am currently a freshmen at skyview high school. I just moved here from Hawaii not too long ago. In my opinion, its actually a lot better than i thought it would be. They have lots of extra curriculars and many unique classes. Everything about this school is awesome. It may have a lack of diversity but being of pacific islander wthnicity i have experienced very little racism. The only thing I don't like about the school is the open walls. In some occassions it helps cuz the classes are closer but most times the noises from other classrooms is distracting. Other than that this school overall is excellent. Anyone of any race could come here and be comfortable. As long as you like cool teachers and (overall) a welcoming student body.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 13, 2007

Great School! My kids love it there. Storm just got a new principal and shes not as enthusiastic as Mr. Little but I'm sure she'll warm up to the Storms spirit. Teachers are really good but some aren't as helpful as they should be. Go Storm!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2007

This has been a great school for our family. Both our kids attend Skyview, and they have had nothing but positive experiences! Lots of activites, good classes, and lots of homework(!), but it's all good. There is a lot of school spirit that cuts across cliques, ecomonic, and race lines. A very accepting and gracious student body!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 11, 2007

My son just finished his freshman year at this amazing school. The SMT magnet program is a social and intellectual haven for him! But they also have top-notch academics in other areas, as well as high achieving sports, music, & drama. The kids are among the most active in the community. The teachers seem to genuinely like working there. The choices are just amazing, allowing kids to specialize toward types of careers and take college classes for both HS & college credit. The fabulously equipped fitness center, food court, credit union, & campus store make it feel like a jr college. The senior-freshman mentoring makes sure everyone knows someone they can ask questions of. The only thing a bit lacking is availability of counselors, with just one per grade. Still, parents take their kids from Portland private schools to come to Skyview!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 18, 2007

I attend skyview high school and overall, I love it. I was reading the other ratings and there are some things I agree with, such as the lack of diversity, but others I don't, such as the school being horrible. Yes, we are known as the 'rich school' in town, but that is, as a representation of the whole school, false. It is an overall middle class school and almost all of the teachers are there for the right reasons, teaching the students skills they will need to succeed later in life. I highly recommend this school to anyone!
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 10, 2005

i love skyview highschool it is a great school that opens up new challenges and skills needed to be developed throughout the 4 years inable to succeed in the 21st century. the teachers care about you and want you to succeed and offers the best possible education while still remaining challeneging and offers a safe place to learn.
—Submitted by a staff


Posted September 6, 2005

I love skyview high school
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 15, 2005

There is a magnet system established in this district with the Math & Science being Skyview. Although there are established arts activities available, the number of students that can participate is limited by scheduling & magnet enrollment. To learn more search the local paper 'The Columbian' with Skyview in the title.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2005

Personally, I enjoy attending Skyview High School. My only concern about Skyview is its lack diversity, over 80 percent of the 1,800 students are surburban white kids. And although it doesn't scream out at you, racism is adimit in the Skyview community. Skyview educational offerings are very broad. Sculpting, Zoology, Human Anatanomy, Sports Marketing, ASL, Dancercize and a Brit Lit class at Starbucks are some of the school's uniquie course offerings. Skyview also houses the districts Science Math and Technology Magnet program. Afterschool activities include sports: Dance team (#1 at regionals), tennis, soccer, track, football, gymnastics, wrestling,etc. The arts: musicals, plays, jazz concerts, etc. Social: dances, pep rallys, movie nights, etc. Clubs: Red cross, Diversity, Key Club, NHS, Leadership, Debate,etc. Skyview is a very active school and sure your student would enjoy attending. Word of Advice: Stay out of cliques! Also school has an awesome food court.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

252 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

215 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
93%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

121 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
95%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

250 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
65%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

248 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
38%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
65%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
31%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
46%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students74%
Female70%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic56%
Multiracial79%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income62%
Not low income81%
Special education40%
Not special education75%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students88%
Female83%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic53%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income73%
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students94%
Female92%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White94%
Low income92%
Not low income95%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students40%
Female44%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White42%
Low income29%
Not low income50%
Special education22%
Not special education50%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students66%
Female66%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander45%
Hispanic55%
Multiracial46%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Low income54%
Not low income73%
Special education50%
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students76%
Female80%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander78%
Hispanic67%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income71%
Not low income78%
Special educationn/a
Not special education77%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students57%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education80%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students69%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education70%
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students37%
Female34%
Male39%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic7%
Multiracialn/a
White49%
Low income13%
Not low income55%
Special education30%
Not special education38%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

435 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
51%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

479 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

469 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
49%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

464 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students92%
Female94%
Male90%
Black82%
Asian93%
Asian/Pacific Islander89%
Hispanic90%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income89%
Not low income94%
Special education78%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students94%
Female97%
Male91%
Black91%
Asian97%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanic81%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income90%
Not low income95%
Special education83%
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 79% 60%
Hispanic 9% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 7%
Black 3% 5%
Two or more races 2% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 18%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 230%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 21N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 13N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 63%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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1300 NW 139th St
Vancouver, WA 98685
Phone: (360) 313-4200

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