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GreatSchools Rating

Ocosta Junior - Senior High School

Public | 7-12

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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9 reviews of this school


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Posted Sunday, August 17, 2014

Ocosta is a great place to get a quality education. All three of my children graduated with honors and went on to four year universities, where they did very well. Ocosta has caring teachers that go out of their way to help students succeed. The only way not to succeed at this school is to not try or to not attend on a regular basis. This school has positive coaches in athletics and many teams regularly go to state. The knowledge bowl team is one of the most successful in the state with approximately 40% of the students participating.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2014

Amazing! I am currently going to this school, and I have been all my life... I'm in middle school and being a kid myself I was very happy about how Ocosta handles threats and problems that occur. I feel like its important to feel safe at school, and I always have because they take things seriously. The lunches they serve are good quality, and not overpriced. I recommend this school.


Posted June 2, 2012

This is the absolute worst school I have ever seen. While the teachers are well as doing their jobs, it's the students that are the problem. Some of the students are disruptive, and the teacher doesn't even send them out of the classroom. Sports are too high of a priority at that school. Everywhere you go, that's all anyone can think about. The girls here are extremely shallow and want a guy who plays sports. They don't even seem to care about his personality and I.Q. If you are a nerd who shuns sports and wants a non-disruptive place to learn, this school is NOT for you.


Posted March 17, 2009

Ocosta High School can do much better. The kids are good, but the curriculum is a drag. It's a little ridiculous, how they dumb everything down for the kids, they need to learn.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2007

As a former Ocosta student, as well as active community member, I feel the overall educational experience is a positive one. Ocosta employs faculty and staff who care about the quality of their educational curriculum, as well as about the wellbeing of their students. I enjoyed being involved in a number of extracurricular and cocurricular activities during my time at Ocosta. It is true that as a small school, some programs are simply not available. Yet I have found that the available activities are great opportunities for fun, learning, and growth. The feeling of community regarding Ocosta schools is phenomenal. Nearly all the students know their peers, and one gets a sense of inclusiveness and support within this small school. Academic expectations are high, while the knowledge and support is there for students to succeed and move on to bigger and brighter futures. Thanks Ocosta. Go Wildcats!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted February 1, 2007

We love this school. I think it is a great school for my daughter Autumn. We moved from Texas and it has been a wonderful choice for us. Great job Ocosta!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2006

Ocosta has been a good school for my children to attend. It's rural enough for all to care and big enough to provide a little needed diversity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2006

As a student at Ocosta, my school may have its down points,but overall,I am very satisfied with my social enviroment and education. Acedemicaly, the teachers are by no means snobbish,they have created a perfect balance between professionalism and friendliness. They are very dedicated to helping us pass the uncoming WASL. Students are held back for a reason other than money. The social aspect of Ocosta is wonderful. For the most part,everyone gets along with everyone and cliques are all but nonexistant. I am comfortable talking with the teachers and coaches, and I really feel like they care about me and my future. Athleticaly,we may not have a very wide variety of choices,but the programs we do have are top notch and have very good seasons in most cases.Also,the small student population allows for more playing time.Overall, I love my school and I would reccomend in to anyone moving to the coast.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 25, 2006

I believe the quality of the academic programs are present. However, it seems most teachers at Ocosta have lost their proffesionalism. They seem aggitated, are snobish and look down upon there students. I work closely with children and high school students outside of the school program, and I know first hand the students are 'losing out' on their education at this facility. It has become apparent, the agenda for Ocosta is to hold back as many children as possible in order to maximize funding for the school. The population has its ups and downs do to seasonal migrant workers, the coast gaurd and families of fishermen. The majority of children at Ocosta believe it is a normal occurence to have been held back atleast one year. Do your children a favor, if you have to move to this area, or the coast is calling you, keep your children in Aberdeen schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
40%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
58%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
39%

2010

 
 
52%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
61%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students66%
Female58%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Low income58%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students66%
Female63%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Low income58%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students57%
Female53%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low income55%
Not low income62%
Special educationn/a
Not special education65%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students37%
Female38%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White42%
Low income28%
Not low income57%
Special educationn/a
Not special education43%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students47%
Female62%
Male32%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White46%
Low income28%
Not low income86%
Special educationn/a
Not special education54%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students61%
Female62%
Male59%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Low income45%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education66%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
83%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
23%

2011

 
 
42%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
95%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
10%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
57%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
62%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students85%
Femalen/a
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White85%
Low income70%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students33%
Female50%
Male18%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Low income38%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education33%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students89%
Female91%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White87%
Low incomen/a
Not low income90%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students10%
Femalen/a
Male7%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White13%
Low income12%
Not low incomen/a
Special education7%
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students52%
Female52%
Male52%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Low income42%
Not low income68%
Special education38%
Not special education59%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students53%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White42%
Low income40%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education53%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

60 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
50%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
79%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

36 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
39%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students56%
Female59%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Low income39%
Not low income84%
Special education12%
Not special education77%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students63%
Female77%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Low income49%
Not low income90%
Special education12%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 76% 60%
Hispanic 12% 20%
American Indian/Alaska Native 5% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 7%
Two or more races 3% 6%
Black 0% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 13%N/A8%
Special education 115%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 263%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 15N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 71%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
College counselor(s)
Computer specialist(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Math specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School psychologist
Special education coordinator
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Industrial shop
  • Science lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Music
  • Band

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Kitchen
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Brian Hunter

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • College counselor(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
  • School psychologist
  • Special education coordinator
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • College/career center
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Industrial shop
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
  • Science lab
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Football
  • Track
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

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TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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2580 Montesano St South
Westport, WA 98595
Phone: (360) 268-9125

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