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GreatSchools Rating

Woodinville High School

Public | 10-12 | 1460 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

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Parent involvement

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14 reviews of this school


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Posted March 10, 2014

This High School is in an excellent area and the Middle Schools that feed into it are excellent. Although the school facilities are excellent, the focus of the school is more about the advantages of being popular and having wealth than it is about self-worth and achievement. You can get on the sports teams if your parents could afford to give you private instruction. You can park close to the school if your parents can afford to pay the ludicrous parking fees. This focus on status and popularity encourages a student culture of class separation and exclusion. As far as the curriculum goes, there are some very dedicated teachers and others that give less than their best. If you don't know this beforehand, or don't know how to get your child into the right teacher, your child's education will suffer. Don't bother reporting things to the counselor's either, unless your parents....oh well, I think you get the picture. This is a great school if you want to teach your child the importance of money and status. If you wan to teach your child the importance of self reliance and self worth, find a different school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 6, 2013

If you want a school where the teachers waste time in class, shove their liberal ideas into your childs head and couldn't care less about their academic success, then this is the school for you. The building is nice and the admin staff are very nice but that doesn't make up for what counts.


Posted May 23, 2013

We like this school, but were very disappointed in the band program. They are touted to have this great band program, and it's just not true. The marching band is a joke...they don't even march! Academics are fine, and I think the environment is good. But the music department is a huge disappointment :(
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2012

As a former student of this school (3 yrs), I read the previous reviews with a bit of amusement. Yes, I was harrassed publically and setup to fail in a Math class; but it often backfired on the teacher, (i.e. when he had to change his answer key.) I still 4.0'd his class. Yes, there are a few drug use problems on both the high and low end of the student spectrum; but again isn't that expected for upper middle class neighborhoods? However, my overall assessment is this is one of the best schools I'd EVER attended. If you want an education the staff here will help you achieve it, period! If you just want to coast, it's not the schools fault if you (or your child) doesn't learn anything. I am VERY Happy I graduated from this school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 25, 2011

Drugs are a huge problem here. The teachers are uninterested in students learning and parents arent very involved. A terrible school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2011

Some of the teachers are truly inspiring; others are just coasting to retirement and waiting for their pensions to kick in. School administration is just adequate but not visionary or creative. Teachers have way too much autonomy and no oversight from administration. Inglemoor HS is far better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 28, 2010

It's an average school, but the teachers there are really bad. They make it hard to succeed and even make fun of some students and they think the're funny, when they just make themselves look bad. Every teacher is very different from the next, they follow their own rules, and talk about what they want.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 27, 2010

This school wasn't the best. The strict rules have gotten out of control by banning lunch outside, and soon the seniors probably won't be able to go off campus for lunch anymore. I've heard about fights occuring, drug use in the little hidden pathway across from the portables, sometimes even sex and other horrible things happen. I guess that is probably every high school though. But this school is just not good personally. All the amazing teachers have retired, now we have horrible new teachers whole only prepare you for the next test, not actually teach you something to use in life. The Learning Center is bad as well. They give you these packets about your "disability" and it just makes you feel AWFUL about yourself! I am leaving this school because of the bad new teachers, the stupid new rules that are now making it into a prison.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 20, 2009

My child attended this school and her grades dramatically went up. Her peers were accepting and her teachers were very involved interacting with us when we emailed. We were able to access her grades and help her stay on track. I am very glad our youngest will be going there as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2006

The level of support seems to be quite good overall, but I would like to see a bit more communication in regard to the website information available to parents. I don't know which teachers are able to post the grades online. Otherwise, it seems to be well run, with good involvement from the teachers and administration.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 21, 2005

Great school, plenty of academic, athletic, and positive club options. Students and staff work together to make this school what it is.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 4, 2005

Good academic and AP programs. Highly rated athletic programs. Principal reacts defensively when approached by parents with curriculum/ teacher concerns.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 1, 2005

Great school with a rough exterior. The facilities are very odd and don't add to the learning experience at all. However, the teachers and staff were for the most part, good to the students and parents. They allowed for great parental involvement - which is not always the case at every school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2005

My daughter attended woodinville High School a year ago. This is an older school, and hopefully will get some remodeling done in teh near future. My daughter would complain about the dirtiness of the bathrooms all the time. Toilet paper all over the place, etc. Usually no t.p. was in there so they had none to use. Teachers wouldn't do anything about it when asked. Teachers overall were fairly good. We had problems with the math teachers, math being a struggle for my daughter, she needed all the help she could get. For the most part, I felt the teachers were pretty good and helpful. Too much emphasis on how you look and how much money your parents have here. Lots of kids with money, nice cars, and not a huge amount of kids working hard to get to where they'd like to go in life. The programs available are good.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

407 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

481 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

449 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
71%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

479 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students95%
Female95%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic85%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income86%
Not low income96%
Special education73%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students96%
Female97%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian97%
Asian/Pacific Islander97%
Hispanic88%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income90%
Not low income97%
Special education88%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

480 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
90%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

248 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
91%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
59%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students28%
Female22%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White30%
Low income27%
Not low income29%
Special educationn/a
Not special education37%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students93%
Female92%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanic80%
Multiracial93%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income76%
Not low income95%
Special education73%
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students91%
Female88%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander93%
Hispanic77%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income77%
Not low income94%
Special education64%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students29%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White40%
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education40%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students46%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 78% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 8% 7%
Hispanic 8% 20%
Two or more races 4% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 110%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 212%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 69%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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19819 136 NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
Website: Click here
Phone: (425) 408-7400

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