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GreatSchools Rating

Davis High School

Public | 9-12

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted March 20, 2014

I am a parent of a Senior daughter, I am very pleased with the experience myself and my daughter had with Davis highschool, they do have great programs, great teachers and great kids!!!!!!!!!! Mrs. Green is the best, she is a great inspiration for students her dress code is very professional and very stylish, we love her!!!!!!!!!!! thank you to all the teachers that helped my daughter for the last 4yrs of her life, YOU ALL ARE A BLESSING!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 10, 2010

I attended Davis high school and let me tell you that it was very disorganize. I think the school should get better staf, as well as actually caring about their students future. The counslers there cream the crop with little intensions of wanting to see their students succed. The office staff makes plenty of mistakes that include your childs gradutation ending up not happening because of their lack of alertness in the student and teacher. Teahers at davis are great, atleast some. They bring personal problems into the classroom and ends up effecting most students. Security guards are no different. In the makings of trying to 'attempt' to make the school a safer enviorment, some, in particular one maybe involved in selling/buying narcotics such as marijuanna mainly. Parents, I do not recomend this school. It has great potential but has so much more flaws that the people know.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 16, 2009

I love Davis high school because it's not like other schools in the way that it's not clique-y. there's no clicks and really no drama. Also academically it's a good school w/ a great IB program.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted February 20, 2009

Davis High school I'd say is one of the best high schools out there. We not only offer a great Honors program, but man let me tell you about the I.B. program; Its above great. I'm about to finish my freshman year and the teachers have not only treated each individual with respect,but have offered their help to us when ever we needed it. Davis also offers some spectacular tutors who are there to help us with anything from math to science. So if you're looking for a great school join us and become a Davis Pirate!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 27, 2008

If you are a parent and are choosing a high school that offers quality information for your child, then Davis High School is the right one. I myself am very fortunate to attend a school that has a dedicated staff that is willing to guide any student into success. I have completed my first year of high school and have gotten a taste of what I need to do in order to leave Davis with the knowledge I and any other student will need in order to be successful in the future. The best way to obtain a solid education is to be inrolled in the Honors system and work your way up to the I.B. program. Although most people have heard that the I.B program is a very rigorous and intense program, I personally think that any motivated individual can complete the program and earn a diploma.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 28, 2008

Despite common belief, Davis is a great high school offering students unparalleled opportunities in the area. Davis is in essence two different schools. For the academically inclined students, the IB program at Davis is second to none. Each year Davis graduates numerous Ivy Leaguers and sends well prepared students to upper echelon universities. If your student has the opportunity, the IB program offers a rigorous curriculum where intellectualism is embraced. When completed, the program essentially guarantees students acceptance to the University of Washington at bare minimum. As a recent graduate, I had the opportunity of involving myself in the IB program and flourished in the challenging courses. The school may appear superficially insubstantial but (even with the bias aside) it is the premier high school, public or private, in the Yakima Valley.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 13, 2008

Shh - IB program is best kept secret in Yakima. This is a live and let live school and even with the scary reputation it has been the best decision for our family. IB is tough but so worthwhile - teachers are great and band program rocks. Keep up the good work Davis staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2007

i find this school to be the best school i have gone to it has good teachers and students that work for there furtures. i feal that there is so meny scolorships that are given out by our school last year we got more scholorships than all the other schools around.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 7, 2007

I am not exactly a parent, but I believe I can give a balanced perspective as a senior who has attended all 4 years. I think the IB program is fabulous and from my experience, it prepares students quite well for college - better than the AP program because IB requires a greater amount of writing and critical thinking necessary in the real world. The principal is very involved in the school and makes a point to get to know everyone, but can be weak in discipline, as is the rest of the administration. However, I feel safe on campus because of the presence of security guards - I know where to go if I need help! The students are, overall, great - if you avoid the ones who don't care about school or life in general. There are so many quality people here, and no social classes and cliques!
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 3, 2007

Davis high foucuses on sports. But it's accademical programs are average, which is fine. And the safety here is 50/50; its average. (i find its worse at Ike High). The teachers are awsome here. The problem is the students. They seem like nice students, but if you get to know them, they are usualy bad people. And while most of them are accademicaly good or great, they lead a bad lifestyle and attitude torwords teachers and other students. So you will probably not find a 'best friend', but a 'Good-classmate' instead, posting a weak social world here.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 14, 2005

Awesome academic program. Very rigorous and challenging. Your child leaves very prepared for college if he applies himself/herself. IB program and full honors courses available. Too bad this school gets bad publicity because it's probably the best kept secret in Yakima County.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2005

Well rounded school, with a commitment to a quailty education. Outstanding teachers who care about their student's success. Helped lay a foundation for my undergraduate and graduate college degrees. Go Pirates!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted October 26, 2005

I think Davis is a wonderful school. It's my first year there, and as a Freshman, it's difficult to get around. There are so many helpful people there who helped me get to know my way around school, and I think its one of the best school in Washington. Although there are certain students which need to be avoided, the majority of them are friendly, and will take time out of their schedule to help you. The teachers are amazing here. They combine a serious straightforward method of teaching, and humor so the teenagers have fun in the process. Personally, Mr. Hurst is my favorite teacher. He is really funny, and I learn so much from that class. I definatley reccomend Davis High School to any student transfering to a High School.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 12, 2005

Would NOT recommend this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2005

Well intentioned, has some highly qualified teachers, so class choices are critical. Tries very hard to improve academic scores, but tends to FAVOR the minority populations in Yakima, rather than focusing on a strong curriculum and high educational goals for everyone, regardless of special needs or superior intelligence. Big dreams, but low expectations. Lot's of lecture and in-class homework, but little hands-on instruction, motivational instruction, after-school activites related to learning, projects to keep students motivated. Biggest complaint from students is 'it's boring.' Perhaps doesn't believe students are as capable as they really are. Worth repeating, this school tends to favor the minorities, to the extent that the non-minorities feel like the minority. Get over it already. The potential for success is equal for all students, as long as the road to get there is isn't too 'straight and narrow.'
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 7, 2004

I'm far from a parent but I do attend Davis and love it. I love the people and the teachers and how well everyone can get along no matter what race they are. I used to attend West Vally and ended up hating school, but then when I transfered to Davis I started loving school again. I thank the staff and really the English department for helping me through many problems and always being there for me. My point is just this, Davis is a great school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 19, 2004

I attended Davis High School for four years and graduated. I feel that Davis provided me with the outlets needed to be successful in my college career as well as my professional career. I recommend Davis to any student who wants to obtain a serious education without having to worry about the torment of cliques that would usual occupy a high school atmosphere. Davis is so unity oriented that there are very little problems and it really provides a family atmosphere as well as an excellent staff and excellent education program.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted February 27, 2004

I feel that the school should contact the parents more when things are not going well. I have always been very involved in my childs progress and I feel he is lost in such a big school. I don't think he is getting the education he should be. My son has always enjoyed school and now all he talks about is quiting which is not an opion in our home. I don't feel the communication is where it needs to be between the teachers/councilors and parents. I have called several times and get no where - just the run around. Kelly R.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 3, 2004

I love it here! If i didn't move from Selah then I might not be here today. I love how this school has no 'groups' of the so called popular or nerds it is so open and friendly.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

302 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
83%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
91%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

182 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
40%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

390 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
24%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

272 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
59%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
27%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

10 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
0%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
20%

2011

 
 
40%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students31%
Female32%
Male30%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic28%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White39%
Low income29%
Not low income44%
Special educationn/a
Not special education31%
Limited English20%
Migrant30%

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students94%
Female93%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic94%
Multiracialn/a
White96%
Low income93%
Not low income97%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrant93%

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students11%
Female12%
Male9%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic9%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White19%
Low income11%
Not low income10%
Special education3%
Not special education12%
Limited English6%
Migrant8%

Biology I

All Students30%
Female29%
Male30%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic28%
Multiracial40%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Low income29%
Not low income32%
Special education5%
Not special education32%
Limited English3%
Migrant22%

Geometry

All Students55%
Female49%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracial82%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low income55%
Not low income56%
Special educationn/a
Not special education56%
Limited English19%
Migrant53%

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students21%
Female26%
Male14%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic21%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income23%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education21%
Limited English8%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students0%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic0%
Whiten/a
Low income0%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students19%
Female18%
Male19%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic20%
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income22%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education19%
Limited English24%
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

432 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
27%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

519 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
62%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

420 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
21%

2010

 
 
20%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

502 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students74%
Female76%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income73%
Not low income82%
Special education28%
Not special education79%
Limited English26%
Migrant65%

Writing

All Students79%
Female85%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic77%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income77%
Not low income84%
Special education61%
Not special education80%
Limited English41%
Migrant72%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 81% 20%
White 13% 60%
Two or more races 3% 6%
Black 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 118%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 281%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 19N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 13N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 58%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ben Ramirez

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
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212 South 6th Ave
Yakima, WA 98902
Phone: (509) 573-2501

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