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GreatSchools Rating

Eisenhower High School

Public | 9-12 | 2022 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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16 reviews of this school


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Posted October 7, 2012

While I can't speak for the non-Honors/AP courses, I am definitely able to conclude that Ike is an amazing school for those that have the drive to take advantage of the opportunities there. The honors teachers all care deeply about their students and do all they can to keep then in the honors/ap track. The administration are fairly competent. While the vice principals have a tendency to be out of touch with the generation they are looking after, the principal is very much willing to do what it takes to create an atmosphere of acceptance that students can thrive in. This school's extracurricular and academic opportunities gave me the skills needed to compete with my current peers in Ivy League at the best undergraduate business school in the world (the university of Pennsylvania). All the tools are available at Ike to succeed, all the students have to do is take advantage of them.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 20, 2012

Eisenhower High School is the best school in Yakima, it has taught me a lot. The faculty is great. I feel safe and respected in the school. I'm to say I attend there now and when I first attended as a freshman I was not scared at all. They really prepare you for life and being on your own.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 8, 2010

The manner in which the Pricipal Stacey Locke conducts herself is very unprofessional. Upon meeting her she failed to introduce herself .We were taken into a room where she asked in a very rude and offensive manner "what we were there for?" She display's a lack of politeness, and self control. When we started to speak she raised her bottom out of her chair, leaned over the table, pointed her finger in the face of my Mother inlaw and spoke in a very aggressive manner and tone.She was also dishonest and uncooperative. If this is how she conducts herself with parents and adults I have to wonder how she behaves herself with students?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 7, 2009

The best High School in Yakima, but it's not the best. Most of the teachers in this school are great. One problem though is the school is physically falling apart, it's just old.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 25, 2006

I absolutely loved my time at IKE. Yes, it was uncomfortable and scary for the first two years, but once I found a niche, I really felt like I was a part of the school. The Honors/AP English dept. is amazing (I'm far exceeding my college-level counterparts), as is the advanced social studies dept. I do, feel, however, that the sciences aren't as rigorous as they could be--usually we just did what we had to do to pass--but the overall community makes up for any pitfalls in the curriculum. My advice to new parents/students: get involved, join clubs/sports and get to know the staff. View IKE as not just a place for an education, but a place to make lasting memories with an awesome community.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted February 18, 2006

Being a graduate of Eisenhower High School, I feel that is a great school. I had great success going on to a University in the state, the transition was very easy and I felt that I was well prepared thanks to the caring Eisenhower faculty. This school was very safe when I attended and I was a guinea pig when they implemented the 3 period days. I feel that I received lots of encouragement to go on and get my B.A. and I owe a lot to former teachers who took an interest in the student's future. My experience at Ike was very positive and I would definitely refer other parents to send their children there to receive a great education and wonderful opportunity to advance in academics and leadership.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted April 4, 2005

I believe that Eisenhower offers a safe environment along with faculty that care about their students in and out of the classroom. The academics at this school offer the opportunity to learn to the students that are willing to work hard for a great education. The athletic coaches and programs help participants to continue their education on the playing field, not only learning about athletics but also learning valuable life lessons. Ike was a great choice for me and I would recomend Eisenhower to any incoming freshman. The only advice I would give is to get involved, take it upon yourself to find your niche. Afterall, it is not the teachers job to make you learn, it is the teachers job to help you learn, and show you a path to learning.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted February 4, 2005

Eisenhower is a school of very poor standing academically, sports, and extra-curricular activities. This school is also a very unsafe enviornment. I would never send a student to Ike.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2005

The acedmics are okay, but only students who already excel will do well (though not because of any extra attention from the faculty). The school is too foced on being 'PC' (take a look at some of the rediculous dress codes on the website), and there are a number of teachers who stopped caring about teaching long ago. Is your child needs assistance, or is 'behind the curve' he will not flourish well here. the faculty focuses on the WASL (a stupid test) and those that fall within the median of the bell curve. Gang issues are low, but there is a real lack of concern or security expressed through the actions of the staff. Given a choice, send your child to West Valley.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 15, 2004

I attended this school and graduated in 2003. Now I'm attending Perry Tech Institute and thanks the Mrs. Cantu I have obtained the needed basics of algebra 2 and the geometry, which have made my life easier here at Perry Tech. So far this school has the potential to take any student to any college they desire.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 13, 2004

Stay away. Eisenhower high school is a place which has taken a great reputation and history and changed it. Although a good education is available, it is hard to find. With a few exceptions, teachers and other faculty fail to give students or parents the respect that one would expect to receive in order to develop a good relationship. When dealing with these staff members it is easy to tell that they have dealt with ill-mannered youth and their ill-mannered parents, which can be found in abundance there. As a former student with a 'typical' Eisenhower experience my only words of wisdom to parents or students planning joining the school are stay away.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted July 26, 2004

I attend Eisenhower high school and it is great. I learn so much in a fun enviroment and I feel safe. I reccomend this high for any student in yakima.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 15, 2004

I'll have to agree. Ike is an OK school. I don't like the open campus. This just give the student more opportunities to do drugs, drink, have sex, skip classes etc....I had a son drop out. He didn't get the help he needed. I didn't get any call backs, just got the run around. I will not be sending my 8th grader to Ike next year. We will definately leave the Yakima area or I will home school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2004

Though Ike has a wide variety of classes and extra-curriculars, the safety and dicipline are poor. Instead of a strong force of security guards, the school has chosen to use ID badges to try and keep the school safe from intrudors which in the past two years haven't done a thing seeing as how the school has still had two bomb threats. Eisenhower over all is great for learning and having fun, but safety and dicipline are of low quality.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 4, 2004

Eisenhower is a great place for any student to grow and develope the necessary skills he or she needs for the future. Students enjoy the atmosphere and learn in a positive manner. There is a plethera of after school activities and clubs to join. If a student can't find something here for them, then it can't be found.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2003

this is a ok school!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

186 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
93%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

195 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
22%

2011

 
 
21%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

395 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
52%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

189 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
64%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

82 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
26%

2011

 
 
32%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
52%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students43%
Female45%
Male41%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic37%
Multiracial58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Low income43%
Not low income44%
Special educationn/a
Not special education43%
Limited English22%
Migrant30%

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female96%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic97%
Multiracialn/a
White98%
Low income95%
Not low income100%
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students24%
Female20%
Male29%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic21%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White32%
Low income21%
Not low income40%
Special education6%
Not special education28%
Limited English13%
Migrant19%

Biology I

All Students49%
Female49%
Male49%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic44%
Multiracial42%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Low income43%
Not low income66%
Special education24%
Not special education52%
Limited English8%
Migrant30%

Geometry

All Students65%
Female60%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic62%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income62%
Not low income74%
Special educationn/a
Not special education66%
Limited English17%
Migrant68%

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students11%
Female12%
Male10%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic12%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White11%
Low income14%
Not low income4%
Special educationn/a
Not special education11%
Limited English13%
Migrant25%

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students40%
Female29%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
White41%
Low income38%
Not low income43%
Special educationn/a
Not special education40%
Limited English20%
Migrant18%

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

462 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
26%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

424 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
71%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

395 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
33%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

420 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students79%
Female83%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic77%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income76%
Not low income88%
Special education57%
Not special education81%
Limited English39%
Migrant60%

Writing

All Students81%
Female86%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic78%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income77%
Not low income91%
Special education59%
Not special education83%
Limited English44%
Migrant52%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 60% 20%
White 34% 60%
Two or more races 3% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 7%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 111%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 269%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 52%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Stacey Locke

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

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702 South 40th Ave
Yakima, WA 98908
Phone: (509) 573-2601

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