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GreatSchools Rating

Discovery Lab School

Public | 1-8 | 27 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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10 reviews of this school


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Posted January 15, 2013

The principal changed within the last 2 years. He appears to be experienced however the school seems to still be transitioning. Teachers motivation appears to be down. Teachers do not return phone calls when there are concerns. There is not support either before or after school if students are struggling in a certain area. We have visited other schools in and outside the district and it appears the teaching methods in this school are not matching state standards. We had one student and two years later his sibling followed...the teacher was teaching the exact same thing...as evidenced through the same worksheets. If your child can work very independently and is very smart this school is for them. If your child needs assistance with something or you hope to work with teachers collaboratively; then this school is not for you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2009

Discovery Lab is awesome because of the wonderful group of caring adults and the community of students. My son has loved all of his teachers and most importantly he feels good about going to school everyday, even when he's struggling with reading or behavior. A truly caring, interested and driven community that fosters the talents and strengths of the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 18, 2009

My daughter attended Discovery Lab for first and second grade. It is a small school and has a definite sense of community. The school does a lot to involve parents in on school activities. I was worried about her attending school with such older kids, but there hasn't been too many problems as there is only one classroom per grade, so easy to keep an eye on all kids. The first grade teacher is excellent, but the second grade teacher is young and lets the kids get out of control quite a bit. I'm hoping for better for third grade. It is definately preferable to a larger school like Roosevelt, for us.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 23, 2008

I went to Discovery Lab for about 6 years . Over those six years i have learned many thing and improved . though we got new teachers often it is still a very loveing enviroment. the teacher work great with the students since the buildings a very small but comferting.I recomend Discovery Lab to anybody who likes a little change and would love to be around not only older kids but also younger kids too. i loved this school and will miss it very much!! ~sincerely Adriana (graduate of Discovery Lab)~
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 3, 2007

We've been at Discovery Lab for seven years now, and it is a wonderful choice for us. We have a fabulous new principal (fall 2007) who has made a huge difference in terms of supporting our excellent teachers, providing a safe and welcoming environment for our kids, and who has successfully advocated for increased resources. This year we are experimenting with more electives for the 6-8th years: we have Sign Language, Spanish, Home Ec, Bridge Building, Art, PE, Band, Orchestra, Technology.This year Dsicovery received a School of Distinction Award (one of 83 schools in the state) for consistent improvements in assessments over the past five years; we reached this distinction as both an elementary and as a middle school; which apparently is very unusual. Always a work in progress, Discovery Lab has much to offer!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2006

My info. about the school is from about four years ago. On the positive side, it's a small school so students always get the teacher's attention and that creates a nice sence of community. On the other hand, when the school first opened there seemed to be a lack of direction and planning when it came to academics. In many senses, the students weren't following the same curriculum as their counterparts at larger public schools in the district. Thus, it might be difficult for some students to make the transition to high school classes. However, the creativity of what they do teach is so engaging that when the students do learn, it's actually enjoyable. It's an extremely safe environment, but I'm a little concerned about the leniency of the grading system, as well as the lack of extracurricular activities.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 3, 2006

The school counselor is sloppy in her research on students and, by many parents, lacks judgment. She has reported CPS incidents with erroneous facts that only the Superintendent eventually repaired. The school principal is more interested in covering their reputations than providing honest queries herself. Not recommended!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2006

Small classes, small school, friendly environment, not the best for children with behavioral issues
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 11, 2005

Great school one of the best in the school district. Exellent school for kids with special needs. Princeipel is great. I highly recomend this school to anyone who wants to give their child a good education.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 23, 2005

This school needs a more parent-friendly full-time principal. Most of the teachers demonstrate a talent for teaching and are responsive to student needs. The small-school concept provides a safer, happier environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
40%

2010

 
 
40%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
35%

2010

 
 
35%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
69%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
38%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
26%

2010

 
 
29%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
68%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
26%

2010

 
 
14%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
46%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
55%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
64%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students31%
Female36%
Male27%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic18%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White46%
Low income0%
Not low income62%
Special educationn/a
Not special education35%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students77%
Female91%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic82%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income69%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education87%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students34%
Female54%
Male19%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic20%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Low income25%
Not low income46%
Special educationn/a
Not special education37%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students55%
Female62%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic47%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income44%
Not low income69%
Special educationn/a
Not special education59%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students59%
Female62%
Male56%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic60%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Low income44%
Not low income77%
Special educationn/a
Not special education59%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students33%
Female40%
Male29%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic25%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White46%
Low income25%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education42%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female40%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic25%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Low income38%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education58%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students29%
Female20%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic25%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White27%
Low income25%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education37%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students38%
Female44%
Male30%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Low income29%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education38%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students58%
Female69%
Male40%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Low income53%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education58%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students69%
Female85%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income50%
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education72%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students65%
Female69%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income50%
Not low income83%
Special educationn/a
Not special education68%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students62%
Female77%
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income36%
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students66%
Female59%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic67%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Low income53%
Not low income83%
Special educationn/a
Not special education66%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students66%
Female71%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Low income53%
Not low income83%
Special educationn/a
Not special education66%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students62%
Female59%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Low income41%
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education62%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
87%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students95%
Female91%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 56% 60%
Hispanic 37% 20%
Two or more races 3% 6%
Black 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 17%N/A8%
Special education 112%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 248%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 16N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 10N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 64%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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2810 Castlevale Rd
Yakima, WA 98902
Phone: (509) 573-5401

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