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GreatSchools Rating

Lake Bluff Elementary School

Public | PK-6 | 547 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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26 reviews of this school


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Posted June 26, 2014

Principal Juffer is out of touch with reality and needs to retire. He does not listen to parents or students and knows best without listening to constructive criticism.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 11, 2013

This is a great school with excellent teachers. There is a happy atmosphere in this school and my kids love it. Dr. Juffer sets a positive tone and the curriculum is challenging.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 5, 2013

Lake Bluff excels not only academically, but also at character building. The test scores and placement here and throughout the district speak for themselves, but what can not be measured from the outside so easily is the amazing student community within the school. I have rarely observed anything other than completely happy and confident students inside and outside the school when visiting regardless of their age, gender, race, abilities, and any other factors that, in many schools, mark students for social marginalization.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 6, 2013

As a long-term resident of Shorewood and former educational professional, it is disheartening to see the quality of education deteriorate at one of our flagship schools. Even though our family enjoyed the perks of what started out to be a great school early on, we soon realized beyond the basic A,B,Cs that Lake Bluff wasn't providing a solid education for our kids. In such fundamental skills as writing, the curriculum is not well structured and the teachers try and teach through examples but the children have no context. Further, social studies is probably best taught by reading the text book as there is no value add by the teachers. As for math, the curriculum is pretty good although it appears that the math aide is the real value and not the teachers. This school needs an injection of new talent with teachers that actually care about the kids. Unfortunately during all the protesting in Madison a few years ago, the majority of teachers at Lake Bluff where more interested in their medical and pension benefits versus the teaching quality and attention given to the kids. Sad!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 28, 2013

While my kids have had positive experiences with many of the teachers at Lake Bluff School, Dr. Juffer and the teaching staff are a little too complacent based on the school's high test scores. Just as low test scores are due to family/home environment rather than the schools, high scores are due to the families in the district, not necessarily to the teaching, especially when it comes to math. As a parent who had concerns about what my child was experiencing in the classroom, I was shut down by the teacher and basically given the impression that I am an overbearing, over-involved helicopter Mom and I should just go away. For such a small district, they are not very open to parent concerns.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 16, 2013

Lake Bluff is a truly great, character building school. Principal leads with passion and purpose and his leadership shines through the teachers and kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 14, 2012

I am really sad to hear about the experience of parents who felt like they and their children were treated differently or were unwelcome. I agree it is kind of cliquey on the playground among the parents sometimes. I work full time and am a single mom, and I just don't have time to hang out and chit chat much on the playground, or go to the parents' organization meetings, etc. I think that unfortunately the people who are more down to earth are busy like me and sometimes seemed unfriendly. But over time I have made friends with some families. I have two boys in the school and they both love it. My kids seem to have a real mix of friends and some very close-knit friendships. My older son is in third grade now, and my younger son in K5, and their experience has been really good overall. Teachers who really get to know them, their strengths and weaknesses, and who talk openly with me about how they are doing. They learn a lot, not just academically but about how to be a good person. All in all Lake Bluff is a really great part of our family life.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2012

we moved here a few years ago, and among the families of our older son's classmates met the people who would become good friends here. yes, on the playground it can seem clique-y, but we have always been treated well by the teachers and have found other parents to get along with. our older son had some behavioral challenges in K5, and the teachers helped us work on those. our child who excels in math has been challenged (the everyday math curriculum 'spirals' so that children review material after a few months. it's a shame a prior reviewer didn't get an explanation from the teachers--you they ask about the material?) also, this school has managed to save art and music for even kindergarten, despite statewide cuts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 24, 2012

The school has a great academic reputation that it doesn t deserve. Having moved to Shorewood two years ago, we are still treated like outsiders. Our first grader had difficulty in reading last year. When we discussed this with his teacher, the response we received was well, he didn t go to Shorewood last year . In addition, the school uses the Everyday Math curriculum. My oldest son stared at Lake Bluff in fourth grade, and as a fifth grader was learning the same thing he was taught in third grade at our failing school in Virginia.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 27, 2011

I enrolled my child into this school because of its academic reputation. As a few others have stated, outsiders are treated differently. One parent spoke to me at the new family picnic. Not one parent, not even the room parents, introduced themselves at orientation. I had to approach them and then was met with an "oh hi." I am insulted that many parents had a problem speaking, but did not seem to have a problem calling my home asking for donations to SEED. And yes, my child was singled out and labeled on the first day of school. Sadly enough, my second child, who does not attend this school, has already been labeled by this same teacher. I'm not so sure the academic education is worth the price of my children's mental stability.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 17, 2011

I am a parent of two kids at Lake Bluff and I absolutely love it. My kids are challenged, motivated and encouraged by the principal, teachers and other students. They have a fantastic art and music program, and character education and guidance where they give them real solutions to deal with the challenges they might face. They do their best to break the kids out into smaller groups according to their abilities. My oldest (for whom things come very easily) is involved in enrichment programs like the Spelling Bee, Junior Art Docents, even just extra math and reading to keep her motivated. My younger daughter (for whom things can be a bit more of a challenge) got the help she immediately needed to bring her up to speed with her reading in 1st grade within the first month of school. I love the environment and can't wait for my third daughter to start there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 20, 2010

I can relate with any parent who is "out of the Shorewood area" We too feel like outcasts and our child is treated like a outsider. This school is very clicky and the teachers are not as welcoming as should be. A very liberal school and does not support individualism. Unless you live in Shorewood, you will not be welcomed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 7, 2010

Lake Bluff offers a wonderful Character Education program where student-lead assemblies teach various good character traits to classmates (honesty, perseverance, etc.. Also, available is a multi-age classroom as well as the traditional single age classrooms. I cannot speak highly enough about the teachers and principal!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 24, 2010

I can absolutely support the opinion of the parent of the African-American child. I saw this first-hand when my son was in Kindergarten at that place, and was one of the reasons we left. I saw the African-American students, in-district or not, largely ignored by the other students on the playground, and their parents ignored by other parents. I did not want my child to grow up in a setting where some people were not welcomed or included. There is no sense of understanding that exclusion is a form of bullying at that school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2010

My son was a student at Lake Bluff from Kintergarden to 2nd Grade. We had many challenges with MPS schools so we went as far as to relocate to the district to ensure our son had the best education. As a new African American family to the school and district, we were not welcomed with open arms. When I walked in the door the secretary handed me a 220 application assuming we did not live in the district. This should have been a signal to me. While the education program is great, our family was never welcomed by the other parents and parental groups and our son was treated like he had behavioral problems. He was definatly treated differently by the staff because he was African American. We moved out of state where he has excelled tremendouly (straight A's) and is socially accepted by peers and teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2010

I have to give this school a 2 star rating for the absolute hypocrisy of the teachers, Dr. Juffer, and the Board. My son was in 2nd grade when he asked, 'what does 'I'm working without a contract' mean'? I had no idea what he was talking about. He told me his teacher was wearing a button. I told him, I didn't know, but asked him 'how does it make you feel'? He said, very simply, 'like she is not happy' and 'I don't think she likes being there'. Wow! 'out of the mouths of babes'. Dr. Juffer allowed this. The teachers refused to put any art up on the walls They say they care about education. Hogwash, their benefits exceed 40% of salary, they chose the job, and selfishness is killing this district.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2010

What a wonderful school this is. They have a character education program that is fabulous and the teachers are excellent. Dr. Juffer loves our kids and it shows in the way the school is run.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

I am a grandparent of 2 Lake Bluff students. The minute you enter the door, you know real education is happening there. Lake Bluff is doing everything right.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 12, 2009

My sons have been at Lake Bluff since last year and I am really pleased with the education they are receiving there. I would recommend the school to others. I really love the teachers and Dr Juffer is fabulous.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2008

Talking of Lake Bluff school brings an image of a healthy smiling face sometimes playing soccer with the students and sometimes chatting with them with dearness and friendly gestures. I did not believe that this is Dr Kirk Juffer, the principal of the school. But he is. That a principal can be so nice and easy to his students and their parents was not known to me before I admitted my daughters to ake Bluff School. It is such a nice experience to have him as a principal. The teachers are so kind and caretaking in this school that there remains no concern as a parent about the child's well-being and learning. There is a lot of interaction in between parents but there are some who are seriously constrained within their own status or preferences and a smile is reciprocated by a flash which dies away even before you passed.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 49% in 2014.

68 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
75%

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 34% in 2014.

68 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
52%

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Wisconsin used the Wisconsin Student Assessment System (WSAS), which includes the WKCE and WAA, to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 10 in math and reading, and in grades 4, 8 and 10 in language arts, science and social studies. The WSAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Wisconsin. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level. In private schools, only voucher program participants are tested.
GreatSchools' ratings currently reflect 2012-13 testing data.



Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the WSAS test. As a result of these changes, proficiency scores for Wisconsin schools are lower than they were in previous years.

Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Language Arts

The state average for Language Arts was 75% in 2014.

69 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
91%

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
85%
Math

The state average for Math was 51% in 2014.

69 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
76%

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 36% in 2014.

69 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
64%

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2014.

69 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
90%

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
90%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 91% in 2014.

69 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
93%

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Wisconsin used the Wisconsin Student Assessment System (WSAS), which includes the WKCE and WAA, to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 10 in math and reading, and in grades 4, 8 and 10 in language arts, science and social studies. The WSAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Wisconsin. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level. In private schools, only voucher program participants are tested.
GreatSchools' ratings currently reflect 2012-13 testing data.



Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the WSAS test. As a result of these changes, proficiency scores for Wisconsin schools are lower than they were in previous years.

Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 50% in 2014.

67 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
75%

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 33% in 2014.

67 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
57%

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
100%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Wisconsin used the Wisconsin Student Assessment System (WSAS), which includes the WKCE and WAA, to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 10 in math and reading, and in grades 4, 8 and 10 in language arts, science and social studies. The WSAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Wisconsin. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level. In private schools, only voucher program participants are tested.
GreatSchools' ratings currently reflect 2012-13 testing data.



Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the WSAS test. As a result of these changes, proficiency scores for Wisconsin schools are lower than they were in previous years.

Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2014.

69 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
74%

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 36% in 2014.

69 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
56%

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
97%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Wisconsin used the Wisconsin Student Assessment System (WSAS), which includes the WKCE and WAA, to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 10 in math and reading, and in grades 4, 8 and 10 in language arts, science and social studies. The WSAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Wisconsin. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level. In private schools, only voucher program participants are tested.
GreatSchools' ratings currently reflect 2012-13 testing data.



Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the WSAS test. As a result of these changes, proficiency scores for Wisconsin schools are lower than they were in previous years.

Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students75%
Female70%
Male81%
Black, not of Hispanic originn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin78%
Economically disadvantaged56%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilities50%
Not disabled79%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in English74%
Not migrantn/a

Reading

All Students52%
Female54%
Male51%
Black, not of Hispanic originn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin55%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilities30%
Not disabled57%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in English52%
Not migrantn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Wisconsin used the Wisconsin Student Assessment System (WSAS), which includes the WKCE and WAA, to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 10 in math and reading, and in grades 4, 8 and 10 in language arts, science and social studies. The WSAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Wisconsin. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level. In private schools, only voucher program participants are tested.
GreatSchools' ratings currently reflect 2012-13 testing data.



Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the WSAS test. As a result of these changes, proficiency scores for Wisconsin schools are lower than they were in previous years.

The different student groups are identified by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group. Subgroup scores for each school are only reported for students who were enrolled as of the fall enrollment count. The All students score includes results for all students who took the test, regardless of when they first enrolled in the school.

Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Language Arts

All Students91%
Female90%
Male93%
Black, not of Hispanic originn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilities58%
Not disabled100%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in English91%
Not migrant91%

Math

All Students76%
Female75%
Male77%
Black, not of Hispanic originn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin81%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilities35%
Not disabled86%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Not migrant76%

Reading

All Students64%
Female59%
Male70%
Black, not of Hispanic originn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilities36%
Not disabled71%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in English64%
Not migrant64%

Science

All Students90%
Female90%
Male90%
Black, not of Hispanic originn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilities64%
Not disabled96%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Not migrant90%

Social Studies

All Students93%
Female92%
Male93%
Black, not of Hispanic originn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilities71%
Not disabled98%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Not migrant93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Wisconsin used the Wisconsin Student Assessment System (WSAS), which includes the WKCE and WAA, to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 10 in math and reading, and in grades 4, 8 and 10 in language arts, science and social studies. The WSAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Wisconsin. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level. In private schools, only voucher program participants are tested.
GreatSchools' ratings currently reflect 2012-13 testing data.



Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the WSAS test. As a result of these changes, proficiency scores for Wisconsin schools are lower than they were in previous years.

The different student groups are identified by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group. Subgroup scores for each school are only reported for students who were enrolled as of the fall enrollment count. The All students score includes results for all students who took the test, regardless of when they first enrolled in the school.

Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students75%
Female76%
Male75%
Black, not of Hispanic originn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin81%
Economically disadvantaged62%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilities40%
Not disabled81%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrant75%

Reading

All Students57%
Female63%
Male48%
Black, not of Hispanic originn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin67%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilities30%
Not disabled62%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrant57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Wisconsin used the Wisconsin Student Assessment System (WSAS), which includes the WKCE and WAA, to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 10 in math and reading, and in grades 4, 8 and 10 in language arts, science and social studies. The WSAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Wisconsin. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level. In private schools, only voucher program participants are tested.
GreatSchools' ratings currently reflect 2012-13 testing data.



Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the WSAS test. As a result of these changes, proficiency scores for Wisconsin schools are lower than they were in previous years.

The different student groups are identified by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group. Subgroup scores for each school are only reported for students who were enrolled as of the fall enrollment count. The All students score includes results for all students who took the test, regardless of when they first enrolled in the school.

Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students74%
Female76%
Male73%
Black, not of Hispanic origin44%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin86%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilities14%
Not disabled89%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrant74%

Reading

All Students56%
Female66%
Male47%
Black, not of Hispanic origin19%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White, not of Hispanic origin75%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilities14%
Not disabled67%
English learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrant56%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Wisconsin used the Wisconsin Student Assessment System (WSAS), which includes the WKCE and WAA, to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 10 in math and reading, and in grades 4, 8 and 10 in language arts, science and social studies. The WSAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Wisconsin. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level. In private schools, only voucher program participants are tested.
GreatSchools' ratings currently reflect 2012-13 testing data.



Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the WSAS test. As a result of these changes, proficiency scores for Wisconsin schools are lower than they were in previous years.

The different student groups are identified by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group. Subgroup scores for each school are only reported for students who were enrolled as of the fall enrollment count. The All students score includes results for all students who took the test, regardless of when they first enrolled in the school.

Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White, not Hispanic 68% 73%
Black, not Hispanic 14% 10%
Asian 8% 4%
Hispanic 5% 10%
Multiracial 5% 2%
American Indian/Alaskan Native 1% 1%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: WI Dept. of Public Instruction, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Disabled students 17%N/A14%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 20%N/A41%
Limited English proficient 7%N/A6%
Source: WI Dept. of Public Instruction, 2012-2013

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
At least 5 years teaching experience 82%N/A83%
Source: WI Dept. of Public Instruction, 2011-2012

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree and above 60%N/A55%
Source: WI Dept. of Public Instruction, 2011-2012

Teacher credentials

  This school District averageState average
Teachers with valid license 100%N/A98%
Source: WI Dept. of Public Instruction, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1600 E Lake Bluff Blvd
Shorewood, WI 53211
Website: Click here
Phone: (414) 963-6972

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