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GreatSchools Rating

South Lamar School

Public | K-12

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted February 14, 2012

I went to SLS starting in the 8th grade and left as soon as I got my drivers license. Some of the teachers there are ok, and the rest only care about the "last names". It is a very cliquey school and if you didn't sart there in kindergarten than you will never fit in. I moved to Vernon and my grades improved along with my self confidence. It is a much better school, much less trouble. I graduated in 2002 in the Beta Club and got 3 degrees from UofA. Now my 14 year old sister is getting bullied at SLS and is talking "ending her life because she can't take the bullying". We have talked to the teachers, the principal and the parents but nothing has changed. It is a really sad situation. I hate to say it, but it looks like something that drastic might be the only thing that will snap this school (which isn't even accredited) back into reality. We will be transferring my sister to LCHS next semester.


Posted June 11, 2011

I am a graduate of South Lamar. First of all any education is what you choose to get out of it. If you like to party and not focus on the curriculum then yes, I say you won't learn. However, if you study and are willing to do the work and ASK questions I found that the teachers are willing to help, but there are one or two that is the exception. Every school, business, etc. has cliques. Being popular (or having "the last name") will win you pageants and homecoming and earn you playing time in sports but that's everywhere also. It's all about who you know, especially in the business world. But I received a quality education from SLS and graduated from the University of Alabama. There are many more success stories like mine from the students that did the work and tried to learn while at SLS. For those that thought school was a joke well most of them are unemployed, in jail, or on drugs. So it's what you make of it. And the gossiping and bullying are part of life. Kids need to learn to ignore what doesn't matter and stand up for themselves. SLS makes announcements every morning, often the lack of communication is from the students not relaying the info to the parents.


Posted March 30, 2011

I am a student at South Lamar High, I have gone to SSouth Lamar since the Kindergarten, and I just love it. Everybody gets along, most of the tme. There is some drama, but which school doesn't have drama. The teachers always find time to help you out. I would recommend this school to anybody!


Posted November 1, 2010

I have attended South Lamar since 9th grade and I am relieved to finally be graduating. This is a terrible school. Unless your child has attended the school since young age or has attended other schools nearby. They will be left out of everything. If you arent popular winning anything is out of the question. Sometimes winning things helps out with scholarships. but you will not find these oppurtunitys here. Nobody gets along in this school either. Everyone acts like they get along but they talk about each other like they dogs. Education and teachers are terrible also. Unless your popular or well known you might as well forget any other teachers bendin over backwards for you. they do not care. Honestly this is not a good school and i do not recommened it.


Posted April 27, 2010

I think South Lamar is a great school because the teachers actually take time to make sure you as an idividual understand the lesson. Every school has it's group but this one seems more unified than most. They offer tons of clubs and options for if you're failing. They aren't too strict but just strict enough and we have great caring teachers. I would never dream of going anywhere else. Yeah we're small but we've got spirit and heart and that's hard to find. We may not be the richest or biggest in number but you won't find a school with a bigger heart and I'm proud to attend and cheer at South Lamar!
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 20, 2010

i wen to sls when i was in school. if your are wild and pretty you will fit right in the the poplar group but if not you will be made fun of. most of the teacher are teaching in the old days how they were taught not how they teach now so if u want your kids to get a good eduation i would not sent the to south lamar. if you kids has a learin promble they will get no help at all. that all i got to say about this matter


Posted March 9, 2010

I am withdrawing my child from this school. The bullying and gossiping is out of control. Her grades and slipping and i cant get anyone to send home any extra credit. I am hopeing this new school helps her and I stay more informed of her progess. I never got any grades sent home except for report cards. When I call to get info I have to wait for the counselor to call me back. She was the only help I ever got!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 8, 2009

South Lamar is a wonderful school. They expect a lot out of students, which is great. The teachers are highly devoted to their job; They do more than teach! Teachers there always make sure you have what you need..know what you're doing..prepared for your future...etc.. The administration there is great as well. Principals that make sure everything is being done correctly. It's one of the best schools in Alabama, no doubt.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 20, 2009

I love SLS!! yes everyone has their group of friends they hang out with but what school doesnt?!?! South Lamar has on e of the best opportunitys of getting a great education in the state of Alabama!! Yes they offer relegious clubs/groups and I think thats great!! They dont try to force any student to join. Overall the teachers keep the students under controll...but there are always those days that kids are rowdy!! And SLS gives plenty of opportunnitys for parents to be notified! Their child just might not bring home school notes!! SLS is a wonderful school!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 14, 2009

I have to say that SLS is not a good school at all when it comes to education. The school is more focused on the cliques, sports, and christianity which has no place in a public school. The faculty has allowed many children to be neglected, while others are praised and 'petted' , because their parents are well known in the community. Children are ALL equal in America, and should feel that way while in an American public school. i regret having allowed my children to attend.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2009

I am a student at South Lamar high school I make outstanding grades and play all sports the teachers are wonderful they always are a big help! I came from one of the biggest schools in the state Hoover High school and I love South Lamar , you say they have cliques but you haven't seen anything till you go to a big school ! A down-home country small school is as capable of almost everything that big schools are ! I think that every child should experience laughs and hard work and just be there for eachother not only as a school but as a family! We recentl lost a student who was 12 years old! Madison Brooke Orr she was killed in a car accident but the pain and sadness as a school was made through because we had eachother and a wonderful Faculty! Great place
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 2, 2009

That comment below about there not being any cliques is extremely untrue. You have the popular kids, the black kids, and the others. Everyone is the same here, but then again it could just be the fact that this is Alabama, and people are extremely uneducated and know nothing about alternate ways of life. I do not recommend this school to any one considering to attend SLS. I think that children should be educated in all walks of life so that they may choose their paths for themselves.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 11, 2009

My child's experience at South Lamar has been less than envisioned. Each time we visited his classroom it seemed very chaotic and noisy. My child grammar went downhill after attending this school from picking up poor grammar and speech from his classmates (such as it were and they was). Each time school was dismissed early, (which seemed to happen a lot) we were always the last to be notified and he had to wait outside unsupervised more than once.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2004

I am a student at South Lamar. I love my school. It's a small school, therefore, everyone knows everyone. There are no certain clique's. At SL, we all get along and love the teachers. South Lamar is a fun school, yet they expect much out of us. There are many things to particapate in such as, sports, clubs and other things. I love my school and I don't think I could be happier anywhere else.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 10, 2004

Three of my children have attended SLS. For the most part, our experience has been very good. All but 1 teacher has been caring, teachers concerned with teaching the children and caring about them as individuals. I would recommend this school and it's teachers if you are looking for a small town atmosphere. Children are given the opportunity to participate in many extracurricular activities. The councelors are extraordinary.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

37 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
76%

2009

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

37 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
89%

2009

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

37 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
87%

2009

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

37 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
94%

2009

 
 
94%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 91% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%

2009

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
92%

2009

 
 
92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2012.

48 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
94%

2009

 
 
73%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

48 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
94%

2009

 
 
83%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
72%

2009

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 86% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
89%

2009

 
 
78%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 79% in 2012.

38 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
82%

2009

 
 
64%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 79% in 2012.

38 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
70%

2009

 
 
60%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students73%
Female72%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White79%
Free lunch eligible53%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population76%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Poverty59%
Non-poverty93%

Reading

All Students89%
Female95%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White88%
Free lunch eligible81%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population91%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant89%
Poverty86%
Non-poverty94%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students76%
Female88%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White77%
Free lunch eligible67%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population82%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Poverty65%
Non-poverty85%

Reading

All Students84%
Female94%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White87%
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population88%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant84%
Poverty76%
Non-poverty90%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students98%
Female100%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant98%
Poverty92%
Non-poverty100%

Reading

All Students80%
Female93%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White78%
Free lunch eligible64%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population84%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Poverty54%
Non-poverty93%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students96%
Female90%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White98%
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population96%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant96%
Poverty90%
Non-poverty100%

Reading

All Students92%
Female95%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White91%
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population93%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant92%
Poverty86%
Non-poverty96%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students85%
Female69%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White86%
Free lunch eligible73%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population92%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant85%
Poverty78%
Non-poverty91%

Reading

All Students88%
Female69%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White89%
Free lunch eligible73%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population95%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant88%
Poverty78%
Non-poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students92%
Female100%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White94%
Free lunch eligible82%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant92%
Poverty89%
Non-poverty95%

Reading

All Students76%
Female94%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White79%
Free lunch eligible64%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population83%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Poverty63%
Non-poverty89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 80% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
86%

2009

 
 
76%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
57%

2009

 
 
66%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students65%
Female64%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White64%
Free lunch eligible36%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population70%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Poverty31%
Non-poverty81%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students75%
Female69%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White75%
Free lunch eligible55%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population81%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant75%
Poverty67%
Non-poverty82%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 95% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
100%
Language

The state average for Language was 75% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
76%

2009

 
 
69%
Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
85%

2009

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 83% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
82%

2009

 
 
72%
Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2009.

29 students were tested at this school in 2009.

2009

 
 
59%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 71% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
74%

2009

 
 
75%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 98% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
86%
Language

The state average for Language was 90% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
86%

2009

 
 
97%
Math

The state average for Math was 95% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
93%

2009

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 94% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 94% in 2009.

31 students were tested at this school in 2009.

2009

 
 
97%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 90% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
93%

2009

 
 
94%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students98%
Female100%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant98%
Poverty95%
Non-poverty100%

Language

All Students83%
Female91%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White86%
Free lunch eligible75%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population89%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Poverty84%
Non-poverty82%

Math

All Students85%
Female86%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White89%
Free lunch eligible67%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population92%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant85%
Poverty79%
Non-poverty91%

Reading

All Students93%
Female95%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White94%
Free lunch eligible83%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant93%
Poverty89%
Non-poverty95%

Social Studies

All Students85%
Female82%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White89%
Free lunch eligible83%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population89%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant85%
Poverty79%
Non-poverty91%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty100%

Language

All Students98%
Female96%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant98%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty96%

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty100%

Reading

All Students98%
Female100%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant98%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty96%

Social Studies

All Students93%
Female91%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population92%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant93%
Poverty88%
Non-poverty96%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 83% 58%
Black 16% 34%
Two or more races 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Hispanic 0% 5%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 46%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Marty Kenneth Dawkins
Fax number
  • (205) 662-4544

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

300 Sls Rd
Millport, AL 35576
Phone: (205) 662-4411

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