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GreatSchools Rating

Sumiton Elementary Middle School

Public | PK-9 | 807 students

 

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3 stars


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14 reviews of this school


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Posted August 9, 2010

As a previous student of SEMS I totally recommend the school. I attended the school from 1984 until 1992. I can remember when we had EXTRA classrooms inside the building that were being used for storage. Now that my children are attending SEMS, I am saddened by the fact that they have to have portable classrooms outside the school building because the school isn't large enough to accommodate the number of children that are attending now. The school really needs a new building built for the Junior High. There just isn't enough room in that building for the amount of children that attend school there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 6, 2010

We moved to Sumiton 2 years ago and I really like SEMS.The teachers and staff are very helpful and concerned for the well being of the children.The only complaint that I have is the school itself is not big enough for the amount of stundents that they have .Come on Walker County they need a new elem. and high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 22, 2010

My friend and I think that Sumiton is a pretty okay school. There is hardly any bullying, a just say no program the breakfasts and lunches need improvement. And hot water in the restrooms would be nice. And more or bigger classrooms, and bigger hallways. But other than that we give SEMS a thumbs up!


Posted March 26, 2010

This was the best school. I enjoyed every second. The teachers made learning so fun and very productive in my work. I give it 5 stars!
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 27, 2010

I think this is a wonderful school, the principal is very dedicated to this school and the parents. She does not neglect her position.She really cares for the children. and their best interests. The only complaint I have is that it is a shame the board can't find the money to build a bigger school for them.


Posted October 16, 2009

My son began 1st grade here last year. After a rough start, Ms. Aaron was able to teach him morals, manners and education. She was sweet, but firm. Now, he has Mrs. Black and she has already proven to be a wonderful teacher as well. Other than being overcrowded, SEMS is a wonderful school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2009

This school is great. The education here is outstanding. Also everyone is very welcoming.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2009

My son went to DFBK for 4-year old kindergarten, which was a blessing when he started kindergarten at SEMS. I was horrifed with his kindergarten teacher and he entered first grade with a K-4 education. Had he not attended DFBK, he would have been held back in kindergarten. Now we have an excellent first grade teacher (thank the Lord!). He is fully prepared to enter second grade. He also has been on the honor roll every six weeks! We were truly blessed to have Ms. Aaron this year and are sad to leave her. I look forward to the next seven years here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 7, 2009

the school itself leaves alot to be desired. Too many children and not enough qualified teachers. Most of the disiplinary actions are one sided or only applied to certain children. It is sickening to watch other local cities do so much for their children, and sumiton lack so in the area of our youth.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 14, 2008

I was very hesitant about my children going to school at Sumiton Elem/Middle because of the overcrowded conditions but they are doing as good of a job as anyone can do under the circumstances. The Board needs to get to work and come up with a plan to build a new school for the area. The school currently has approx. 900 children in a 500 children facility and the spread of headlice, staff and other illnesses is too severe because of this fact. Despite all of the obstacles, my children appear to be quite happy here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2007

I was hesitant about my child going here, especially after attending Sumiton Christian. However, the staff has made a believer of me. This was a much better fit that SCS. My child has made the A-Honor Roll, is much more enthusiastic about school, and has made great progress. The teachers really do care, and it shows in the effort they have put towards the children. They take extra time to ensure that the child is learning and progressing as they need to be. Overall I am very pleased, and wish we had attended this school those years we were at SCS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2007

I am very pleased with Sumiton. My son has been going there since K-5, he is now in the 4th grade. I give a special thanks to Mrs. Butler,Mrs. Hall,Mrs. Dutton, Mrs. Myrick,Mrs Myers...and to the many teacher aids & others I have not named...they all deserve our respect. My hat is off to each of you. We all need to support our teachers....our school & our children. God Bless
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 21, 2006

I believe that sumiton could be alot better in teaching .My child attended this school for 4 yrs. K-3 and was not taught like he needed to be .Some of the teachers does not need to be there .This school needs alot of improving .I took my son out of this school and he now attends corner and does very well .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2005

We are fortunate in that the students here are taught the Kumon Math program, all schools would behoove themselves to have the aforementioned program. I think all schools, including Sumiton, should reinstate the tried but true reading method of Phonics (In keeping with the, 'If it isn't broke don't fix it!', ideaology) Most of the rules and regulations instated at Sumiton are reasonable. I would love to see this system encourage far more parental involvment than it currently does. My experience with the current Principle, Mr. Scott, has been pleasurable and he is a very caring Authority figure for the children to look up to and respect, as well they do. Sumiton is a very overcrowded school and is in desperate need of a bigger facility, given that limitation, the faculty has done a job better than most could ever try to accomplish with said strained resources.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
75%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students95%
Female100%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible93%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Poverty94%
Not poverty97%

Reading

All Students95%
Female100%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Poverty92%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students76%
Female78%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible75%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education43%
General population81%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant76%
Poverty75%
Not poverty77%

Reading

All Students78%
Female88%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible73%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education36%
General population85%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant78%
Poverty73%
Not poverty86%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students93%
Female93%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty92%
Not poverty93%

Reading

All Students92%
Female88%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant92%
Poverty89%
Not poverty97%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female93%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%
Poverty87%
Not poverty92%

Reading

All Students89%
Female95%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible86%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%
Poverty87%
Not poverty92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students76%
Female72%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible74%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant76%
Poverty72%
Not poverty80%

Reading

All Students94%
Female94%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible94%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant94%
Poverty91%
Not poverty98%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students88%
Female90%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant88%
Poverty81%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students91%
Female93%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible85%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant91%
Poverty85%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students87%
Female84%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant87%
Poverty87%
Not poverty87%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students81%
Female80%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible78%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant81%
Poverty75%
Not poverty88%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 94% 58%
Black 4% 34%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Hispanic 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 57%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mrs Deborah Owens Peake
Fax number
  • (205) 648-0183

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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275 1st St North
Sumiton, AL 35148
Website: Click here
Phone: (205) 648-2390

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