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Mariposa School Of Global Education

Public | K-8

 

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Living in Agoura

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $485,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,400.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 5 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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150 reviews of this school


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Posted May 19, 2014

I have been very impressed with the new principal Nema Pierce. She has done a fine job this year. This is her first year as principal and she had big shoes to fill. The teachers are great and really care about the students and education in general. A lot of school wide family events throughout the year and the campus is always being renovated and improved in different ways. A great place to have my child attend.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2013

Colossal Disappointment. The curriculum is woefully deficient and inadequate and the parents appear to equate the Waldorf method with a non-rigorous curriculum. This school does not hold up when compared to other Waldorf programs, such as Waldorf School of the Peninsula. And I question if it s truly Waldorf as it infuses other alternative approaches, such as Montessori, yet claims the learning outcomes to be equivalent to an accredited Waldorf school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2013

Both my son and daughter attend Mariposa and are doing fabulously. This is their fourth year and, despite the lack of emphasis on testing, they both consistently score advanced on their standardized state tests. More than that, they are not subject to the intense pressure, stress, and discouragement of a school that focuses solely on test scores. They actually have time to enjoy life outside of school instead of spending hour after hour on mindless homework. The teachers are passionate and consistent, the philosophy is solid, and the children are happy. Couldn't ask for more.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 3, 2013

My child 's been very happy since she's started this school. We are new to this school and so far we like every thing about it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 28, 2013

This school sounds good and 2 years ago I would have agreed. However, in the two years my child has attended Mariposa, it has had a name change; a revised curriculum; teachers left; and there became an unusually high focus on fundraising. There is a $500+ annual fee that is "encouraged" but almost 40% of the parents do not pay - and instead of being used in the classrooms, is spent on teacher waldorf education because they cannot hire qualified waldorf experienced teachers. When questioned about it, the parent organization stopped publishing their budget and does not provide it when asked. At one point there was a $75K reserve fund...So why do the teachers keep sending emails asking for money for classroom items?! Though parents are very active, a clique of a fewvcore families drive changes that they want to make in the curriculum continuously...It seems this school has such a problem deciding what it wants to be (montessori, waldorf, blended...which leaves our kids in a petri dish scrambling to meet state core standards...and sadly the potential that we saw when we enrolled seems to be squandered in the quest for control or money... A real shame.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 26, 2013

Don't send your kid here. You can do better. It is not as advertised, and we regret our decision to send our child to this school. The cult of personality within the parent volunteer association is toxic. The politics are revolting. The curriculum is nonexistent. The latest principal, having been there only one year, is leaving, and they have managed to push out faculty that is dedicated to the montessori approach. They do not, in fact, treat each child as an individual. They treat each child, contrary to their sales pitch, like a robot.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 4, 2012

My husband and I are highly educated people and do not take the education of our children lightly. We also know that the "race to nowhere" is a big problem in many mainstream schools right now, and it is making children all over the country stressed out and creating a hatred of going to school. Our son graduated Mariposa and went to a very academic prep-school and has gotten straight A's, there. Mariposa gave him all he needed academically, to succeed- including a LOVE of learning. My daughter is now in 5th grade. She is coming home, excitedly showing us her beautiful main lesson books she has created, illustrating the in depth world studies they are exploring. We asked for her to adjust her math and they give her some more challenging work and the teachers thoughtfully worked up a program for her. Mariposa is a community where the children can be themselves- no matter who they are. We believe that stressing children out and over-loading them with only the information for the standardized tests is doing them a disservice. The teachers and the past and present principal are such amazing people, that care about each individual child. There's a reason there's a waiting list!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2012

I keep hearing that test scores don't matter at Mariposa. Good thing parents really believe this because it shows loud and clear. Wonder if any of these kids will ever be taking tests in the future say in High School or College (if they pass the entrance exam)? Year--API 2008- 851 2009-833 2010-826 2011-811 2012-806 Any one see a pattern?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 6, 2012

Be very careful in considering this school. The parents are very friendly and welcoming and it's a warm environment for the kids. However, the academics are lacking in so many ways. It "feels good" to have your kids here, but they are so behind and are lacking basic foundational skills. One of the tenants is "social-emotional is just as important as academics", that sounds good and it's important, but it appears that this school actually values social-emotional MORE than academics, which is an odd balance for a school. It seems to work well for the younger grades, but sadly, the upper grades are lacking and these kids will pay the price when they enter high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2012

This school has a great group of concerned, dedicated parents that want something different for their children. While Mariposa offers many great non-academic programs, the school is failing it's children academically. This becomes increasingly evident as the children move to the higher grades. Look at the test scores. There needs to be more of a balance between the whole-child-social-emotional and the academic. The emphasis on culture over academics and the loose structure in the classroom does a disservice to the children that will be felt by them and their parents for years as they struggle to "catch up." It doesn't matter how strong the "community" may appear to be, there are many parents that are nervous about the long-term effects on their childrens. A more balanced approach is possible. The well-meaning principal has become so blinded by his idealism and "alternative" approaches, he seems truly unable to react and respond to the lack of real learning taking place in the upper grades. A new principal is taking over in the fall and we can only hope that this Emperor Does Have Clothes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2012

We had high hopes for this Waldorf based school, sadly, it has fallen short. If you are easily led, blindly through the education system, if you do as you're told and don't make waves, if you believe that being "alternative" is more important than a solid education for your child, if you are naive enough to think that your child will succeed without a great education - that somehow through osmosis your child will become well-rounded - than this school might be perfect for you! The parents here are deluded into thinking that they are somehow doing better by their children. Those who are smart or experienced enough see the test scores and what's happening in the upper grades and silently worry that they made a bad decision, but it's too late for them. Unless you are committed to an alt education for the long haul, straight through high school, I would highly reconsider Mariposa. Lucikly for the children there, the unprofessional, crunchy Pied-Piper principal is on his way out and a new, seemingly more professional one will take his place. Perhaps then, the school will begin to live up to it's false reputation. I truly hope so, because the potential for a great school is there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 16, 2011

American elementary education at its best! The principal is awesome!!! "Ja wohl, mein Fuhrer!" - if you don't know what it means - Mariposa is right for you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2011

We are so fortunate to be a Mariposa family! If your child is suffering in the typical public school's "race to nowhere" - emphasizing standardized tests instead of focusing on children's authentic learning and development - please know that there is a public school that has its priorities straight, and is dedicated to providing children with a meaningful school experience. Thank you, Mariposa teachers, staff, and School Coordinator - you are a beacon of light for the future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 6, 2011

Whether it is the focus on healthy lunches, the commitment to keep commercial icons off of kids clothing at school, or just how the kids treat each other, Mariposa is committed to a strong, safe development environment. Mariposa can a little "crunchy" at times. There is a strong contingent of "progressive" values that sometimes border on being hippie like. That is good and bad. Some of the parents cannot talk about school lunches without getting emotional about the fact that they should be organic or raw. On the other hand, if came to the school to brag about who you know or what you have, your child would have an open play date calendar quickly. (Good) Another mixed bag is the entrepenuerial status of the school. Mariposa is taking on new education approaches (i.e. Singapore Math, Teachers with same class from 1st to 3rd grade). With that, there is uncertainty and risk. You have to be comfortable with that to be there, because if you wanted the standard approach there are plenty of functioning alternatives in the Las Virgenes School District already. Overall this is fun to be a part of. As a parent I am with my Mariposa child every step of the adventure.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2010

This school provides a new approach to education. A more develomental alternative!. My kids are so happy with Mariposa Elementary School of Global Education!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2010

My son thrives in this nurturing environment. It's not only a wonderful program, it's an inspiring one!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2010

I love that the school is teaching my child about how to resolve conflicts peacefully.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

I love that the children learn about nature, take nature hikes and meet with naturalists often. My daughter loves to come home and tell me all about what she learned on her field trips and lectures with naturalists. She learns more about nature and has an appreciation for the environment and its living things. The teachers at her school are amazing. They are kind, patient and take their time with children. I feel I found a real gem with this school. I'm grateful my child is thriving in this environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2010

Because they support each child individually with respect and love. They teach a unique style and empower the children to global community thinking.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2010

Mariposa nurtures my child's creativity, curiousity and sense of self.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

841

Change from
2012 to 2013

+35

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

841

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+35

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

5 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
59%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
44%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
68%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
39%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students72%
Females63%
Males78%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students72%
Females50%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability77%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students58%
Females59%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)54%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate63%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate62%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students70%
Females68%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)68%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability73%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate69%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate76%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students83%
Females67%
Males96%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate78%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students74%
Females57%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate61%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students76%
Females77%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students56%
Females45%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)57%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability65%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate59%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate67%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students77%
Females73%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students63%
Femalesn/a
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate45%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students68%
Femalesn/a
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Femalesn/a
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students69%
Femalesn/a
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)60%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 82%
Hispanic 8%
Two or more races 6%
Asian 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1%
Black 1%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 3%N/AN/A
English language learners 8%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Nema Pierce
Fax number
  • (818) 707-7624

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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6050 North Calmfield Avenue
Agoura, CA 91301
Website: Click here
Phone: (818) 707-7144

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