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GreatSchools Rating

Black Diamond Middle School

Public | 5-8 | 992 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars


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33 reviews of this school


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Posted August 20, 2010

My daughter has attended BDMS for the past two years and will be entering 8th grade this school. I have nothing but respect for the teachers and the Principle of this school. I am a very involved parent and I also work a 9 to 5 job, but I make time to make sure my daughter's homework assisgnments are complete and if she is having problems with a subject I notify the teachers by e-mail and they are more than willing to provide extra attention before or after school. I think BDMS is getting a bad rap based on uninvolved parents and students. Frankly, if your child isn't doing well maybe you should check your involvement level.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2010

Black Diamond isn't top notch but it isn't horrible either. But they could improve on the teachers, one of the new teachers there is Mr. Sandberg he teaches Mr.wilson's old class and at first i didn't like him but I learn now in his class. Also someone once told me that it's not the soup it's somthing in the soup that makes it bad. So if you think B.D.M.S. is a bad school well then everyone in the school is bad because we are all one school.(But I should take some of my own advice because I'm not a trouble maker but im no goodie-two-shoes either.) Also if you are considering going to this school, please do because I promise you will learn, but only if you don't talk, aren't a trouble maker, and very respectful, basicly you live by the character counts, Trust me I know this from experience...
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 5, 2010

This school isn't so great.Students talk back to their teacers , fights everday.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 11, 2009

There's gum everywhere. Spray Paint. The books are lousy. The P.E is terrible. The office is so unfriendly and rude it really just boils my blood. The only good thing about this school is it's music program.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 21, 2009

I went to BDMS and it went well, I had great teachers. Sure, no school is perfect, some things could be improved but every school is like that. Don't blame the school for your kid failing, or not getting attention. Teach your kid to go after class and ask the teacher to explain the lesson in a different way. Have them take notes and participate in class. You can have them get a couple of kids' numbers who are good at the subject and have them call when they need help. Cut back on the T.V. and video games. Look over their home work with them and tell them what they need to fix/or improve. Like handwriting is suppose to be neat and able to be read. Even have them gather their friends and form a study group. Most of all be involved! Do all this and they won't fail!
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 28, 2009

I have an Eight grader at Black Diamond.At first i didn't like that the teachers made no effort to get a hold of me regarding my child's education.Then the progress reports seem to be off regarding my child and her conduct.My child is a straight A and B student with no attitude problems.So after doing a little research i found out many of them had made errors.And that alot of them didn't really even remember who my child was.As their student daily ratio thru eight periods is overwelming.After writing letters to them and advocating on her behalf.They seem to have a clearer picture about who she is and what she can do.It's a good school with alot of good kids.One bad seed shouldn't give it a bad rap.If you choose this school,be involved,be visible and advocate for your child.My child has a lot of really great friends.But then again,she's pretty great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2009

Black Diamond is a great middle school. It does have alot of gum on the floor, but its because it a very old school. Come on people, the school was built in 1995! give it a break! The principle is Great! He is very involved in our school. The teachers are great, but you have to treat the respectfully, or you wont get any respect back. And we are also going to uniforms. and I think we will have a great school year next year!
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 15, 2009

If your son doesnt know what community means that is your fault. By the time your child is in middle school they should Know they live in a communtiy. Starts at home mame. Also for the lady who said the teachers are horrible and old. There are not any teachers that are old. There are seasoned teachers who are wonderful but they are not old! There are many young and middle aged vibrant teachers. No teacher at BDMS is ready to kick the bucket.. So maybe you should go to the school and meet the teachers insead of moving your child when they dont make the grades and see what the problem is. Sounds like it stems from home.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 15, 2009

Dirty Campus! Gum all over the floor, and under the desk! The students are all out of control. Their trying to make the school better, but obviously not working. The classes teach you a lot, really good staff!
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 22, 2009

My child attends BDMS she is a 8th grader and she transfer from a school in Pleasant Hill in 7th grade and seems to be getting A's and B's I dont have any problem or issues with the teachers i thik parents should take some responsibilities. Teaching kids doesnt just happen at school we gota be there for them at home as well. I have nieces who attend and one came from private school and she adapt well and getting good grades. Im a firm believer it starts at home. So i know from experience that black diamond is a good school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2009

People who do not go here who have heard things about it might think it is a bad school. It is not a bad school. Yeah, it has some isssues but doesn't every. I think it is absolutley ridiculious how people say it is a bad school when they do not even know. I go here and I love it. Staff are great! I really love this school!!!!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 17, 2008

This is a really good school with a good staff
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2008

Ilove this school! The teachers are great, and I'm learning sooooooo much! My favorite thing about BDMS is music class!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 23, 2008

This school is horrible. My child went here for sixth grade. she changed from another school in Antioch and in the first quarter i could already see her loss of intrest in school and her attitude. In 7th grade i ended up changing her schools when she was getting C's and D's. Black DIamond has old teachers and the school focuses on all of the negative things. and the principle is never around. He has no control over the school at all. i would never let my child go back to that filthy school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 6, 2008

Although Im in high school now. My brother goes there and he's in 7th grade. The teachers my brothers have are good, but they may not always have one on one time with the student. This has my brother not adjusting to the school very well. The teacher need to pay more attention to the individual student instead of assuming all the students know the material. They should ask the students individually if they know or not.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2008

welll i have to say its good because i go there and it may not be the best school but its my school and we have great teachers and test scores!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 14, 2007

bdms is great school to send your child. I am in 8th grade ,I have been in bdms since 6th grade and I would not have picked a different school to go to. Shire Black Diamond has its bad sides but i belive that every school no matter how good it is will still have a bad side. the teachers are great and if any student has a problem with anything you could go to any of the VP's. I would highly recomend you send your child to Black Diamond
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 29, 2007

Our daughter recently graduated from Black Diamond with wonderful grades and we could not be more proud of such success. But, not half of this she would have accomplished if not for her being able to attend such a fine and well represented school as Black Diamond is. If it were not for the outstanding support of the school staff and academic teaching standards that BDMS upholds, our communities' children would be at a great loss. So we happily commend and applaud BDMS staff and teachers for their love, support and genuine care that each has implemented over the years to help our communities' children excel to a level of greatness that without BDMS would be sadly lackly for our children of tomorrow.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2007

This school is really bad. The sad fact that teachers don't contact you even when you are asking for their assistance in helping your child learn. My poor child doesn't know what the word 'community' means after I tested her on the words out of their planner. And I really hate to mention that a teacher swore at my son just because he got up to get tissue for his nose (I was at the class at the time to check out my son's progress).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2007

My son is just ending his 6th grade year. I was very apprehensive about sending him to this school at first, but it has turned out just fine. Academically, I was very impressed with his two main teachers (Mr. Bolmberg and Ms. Garcia). They stayed on him all year and kept me informed every week on his progress. I was very concerned about security. However, the principal and the campus security person were awesome! They kept the students in line all year long. With more money and support, they would definitely benefit from having more sports teams, clubs, and after school programs.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

768

Change from
2012 to 2013

0

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

768

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

0

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

220 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
46%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

221 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
37%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
69%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

211 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
55%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

189 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
37%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
35%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

207 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
49%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
29%

2011

 
 
32%

2010

 
 
26%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
100%
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

223 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
40%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

207 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
53%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students43%
Females44%
Males43%
African American26%
Asian42%
Filipino79%
Hispanic or Latino42%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)62%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Non-economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability44%
English learner11%
Fluent-English proficient and English only48%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented89%
Parent education - not a high school graduate24%
Parent education - high school graduate42%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)37%
Parent education - college graduate63%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate40%
Parent education - declined to state48%

Math

All Students37%
Females35%
Males40%
African American18%
Asian67%
Filipino58%
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Non-economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability38%
English learner12%
Fluent-English proficient and English only41%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented89%
Parent education - not a high school graduate24%
Parent education - high school graduate39%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)33%
Parent education - college graduate57%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate50%
Parent education - declined to state33%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students81%
Femalesn/a
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students50%
Females48%
Males52%
African American32%
Asian71%
Filipino61%
Hispanic or Latino51%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Non-economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability51%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only53%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate29%
Parent education - high school graduate41%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)55%
Parent education - college graduate63%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate77%
Parent education - declined to state35%

Math

All Students35%
Females30%
Males40%
African American21%
Asian50%
Filipino53%
Hispanic or Latino37%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)46%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Non-economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability35%
English learner9%
Fluent-English proficient and English only36%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate18%
Parent education - high school graduate29%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)26%
Parent education - college graduate66%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state15%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students42%
Females47%
Males36%
African American35%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino42%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)53%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Non-economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability42%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only43%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate47%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)39%
Parent education - college graduate47%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state33%

English Language Arts

All Students51%
Females60%
Males41%
African American33%
Asian50%
Filipino81%
Hispanic or Latino54%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Non-economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learner9%
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate43%
Parent education - high school graduate56%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)55%
Parent education - college graduate58%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state38%

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students20%
Females22%
Males19%
African American12%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino19%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)36%
Economically disadvantaged15%
Non-economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disability4%
Students with no reported disability24%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only23%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate8%
Parent education - high school graduate31%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)25%
Parent education - college graduate23%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state11%

Geometry

All Students86%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability86%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students47%
Females50%
Males42%
African American26%
Asian50%
Filipino82%
Hispanic or Latino46%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantaged34%
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disability13%
Students with no reported disability50%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate29%
Parent education - high school graduate42%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)49%
Parent education - college graduate63%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state34%

Science

All Students69%
Females68%
Males71%
African American55%
Asian88%
Filipino94%
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learner40%
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate54%
Parent education - high school graduate60%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)74%
Parent education - college graduate80%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state62%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 33% 7%
Hispanic 28% 51%
White 19% 27%
Asian 14% 11%
Two or more races 5% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 2% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 56%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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4730 Sterling Hill Drive
Antioch, CA 94531
Website: Click here
Phone: (925) 776-5500

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