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GreatSchools Rating

Joaquin Miller Elementary School

Public | K-5

 

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Living in Burbank

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $405,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,690.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted June 7, 2013

Our daughter just graduated from Miller Elementary. Since kindergarten to 5th grade we can't say anything but excellent words towards principal, teacher and staff. This school became home for our child. The principal gathered talented teacher, the teacher love kids and love to teach. 35 students out of 150 received presidential academic award this year. Excellent school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 4, 2013

Miller has outstanding teachers and a committed and devoted Principal and support staff. There are multiple opportunities for after-school enrichment classes and a concerted effort to provide as many small-group learning environments as possible within each classroom.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 15, 2012

My response is to the negative comments below... Schools NEED parents. Burbank does have great schools, the finger should be pointed at parents in Burbank instead. I agree, the office staff can be short, the PTA can be stronger and the crossing guard does yell. Parents need to start participating!!! I've communicated with our teachers through email since Kindergarten. I've dealt with the school office on numerous occassions. I agree that needs improving. But, I was there for my child and reminded them I appreciate their attention. I got it! Crossing guard can be snippy, but it all boils down to the parents. There is a drop off- do you use it? Have you noticed those dropping off in the middle of the street, in alley ways or in front of kindergarten gate (stopping the law abiding drivers) ??? There is a PTA (parent/teacher/association) are you a memeber? Usually there are only about 8 parents in these meetings, there are about 800 kids in the school. If you're so curious as to whom is caring for YOUR CHILD majority of the day... Schedule a meeting or better yet VOLUNTEER in their classes. YOU're not the victim, these kids are - Bad habits start at home.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2012

I moved to Burbank partly due to the fact that they have great schools. So you can see why after only having my daughter in this school for 3 and a half months I am disappointed to say I will be trying to transfer her as soon as I can. Mainly because the staff is so unorganized and rude that it makes me wonder how they treat the kids. Even the crossing guard spends every morning yelling at parents to the point that I try and avoid crossing the street because it's such an uncomfortable environment. The fact that the school allows these people to represent them is what drives me to believe this isn't the best fit for my child. I have only met her teacher once so far, but at least I hear she's nice. Thank goodness. When it comes to the learning, I think my daughter is learning a great deal. However, with lack of communication I won't know how things are going until I meet the teacher for only the second time during parent teacher conferences.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 7, 2012

Such a great school.My daughter is attending Kindergarten now.I'm so pleased with teacher Mrs. Diana Pelayo.She is very professional and attentive. After school programs good planed, children getting all support learning English as a second language.There is math and reading support too. The Principal of the school ,Mrs. Judy Hession is amazing,how she is managing and dealing with everything! She have nice support to work with - teahers,school staff .Happy and thankful for everyone working in this school.Children -is our future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2011

My daughter attended kindergarten at Miller and is now a 1st-grader there. The teachers are great and they do implement a strong and well-balanced academic program. My dissatisfaction comes from the support staff. They can be downright crude at times (the school nurse especially) and I have witnessed their antagonistic and patronizing attitude towards other parents. The cross-guard employed there would not hesitate to yell at parents from across the street! I mentioned this during a casual conversation with the current principal and apparently, she thinks that some parents deserve this kind of treatment. She also mentioned that as a rule, if she knows the parent that's a bad sign. I thought schools are supposed to encourage communication and parent participation, but I guess that is an outdated idea. Food for thought.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2011

I love Miller school. It's the best school. My son attended K-5 and love every single minute of it. Teachers and staffs are very nice and kind.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2010

The 6 rating (April 2010) does not accurately reflect the quality of this school. My daughter attended K-5 and loved every minute of it. She also thrived academically and socially thanks to the great teachers and the positive environment fostered by the principal. PTA and Booster clubs are strong and provide the additional funding lacking from the state for art, music, family events and educational 'extras' like assemblies and science camp. We loved this school and will always have fond memories to cherish.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2009

Joaquin Miller is a great school, a diamond in the rough. From the Principal, Judy Hession, who is involved at all levels, to the teachers who are caring and passionate about their role, to the cleanliness and order of the school. It's all great. We moved from private school to Miller and couldn't be happier. And our newest excitement is our 1st grader is using on-line learning for reading and math as part of her nightly homework. I love that today's technology is being used as a teaching tool. My hat goes off to the Principal and staff at Miller. Thank you!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2007

We moved to Burbank last year and I had my doubts about the public schools here. Luckily, Miller proved to be a pleasant surprise, and now I find myself looking for a home in this area, so I don't have to move my kids. The teachers I have met are so involved and so thorough and appreciative of the parent involvement, which is another reason I love this school. The API score moved up to 8 last year and I don't see it stopping. Everyone here is so committed that there is only one way to go and that's to the top.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2007

I have a second grader here and a Kindergartner here and I could not be happier. Both teachers, Mrs. Martinez and Mr. Spence are really good teachers and fine people. As are the other teachers I have met here. The parent involvement, PTA and Booster Club are like none I have ever seen. I was recruited! Great energy here and a very ethnically diverse enrollment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2006

Our daughter had the most extraordinary kindergarten teacher -- Mrs. Martinez. She really engendered a love of learning in her -- not easy as our daughter was really turned off to academics from pre-K -- and gave her extra help where needed. As a volunteer, I got to know all the kindergarten teachers and they are all remarkable. I only wish we were able to continue at this fine school, but we're moving! All staff are highly committed to the kids and there's a solid group of parents who are active in the PTA and who are trying to develop more after-school enrichment activites.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 2, 2006

Miller Elementary has the greatest teaching staff. I highly reccommend sending your child to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2006

A fairly high quality education with a very multi_cultural population. Teachers are for the most part engaging and involved in their teaching. Many exceptional staff memmers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 6, 2006

Two of my children have been going to Miller since Kindergarten. Overall, I'm very happy with the school. Out of 8 teachers my girls have had, only 2 were lackluster. If your child is assigned a teacher you don't like, there's nothing you can do about it. However, dispite those two teachers (and the subsequent year each daughter had to deal with them), the other teachers have been very enthusiastic and care about their jobs. They really seem to enjoy teaching the kids. Overall my daughters have had a very positive experience at Miller Elementary.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2006

I feel that this school does offer quite a bit of extra activities for the students to participate in. There is a high level of parent involvment as well, which I think is essential to my child's education. My daughter seems to have also accelerated quite a bit in her learning as well and the teacher is definitely good at letting you know what, if anything, needs to be focused/worked on.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2005

Wonderful teaching staff, falculty and students. For the largest elementary school in Burbank, Miller ranks top when it compares to quality of teachers. All are 'Highly Qualified' and put in 110%. Miller also has a diverse student population that provides more learning than test scores relay.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 23, 2004

great school, some of the best faculty i've ever seen.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

884

Change from
2012 to 2013

+12

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

7 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

884

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+12

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
44%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
50%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

119 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
72%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

152 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

151 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
71%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

151 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students70%
Females76%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Economically disadvantaged62%
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability72%
English learner58%
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)83%
Parent education - college graduate69%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students80%
Females78%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantaged80%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learner78%
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)89%
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students60%
Females57%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantaged52%
Non-economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability62%
English learner43%
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)56%
Parent education - college graduate57%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students80%
Females75%
Males87%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino74%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learner67%
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)68%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to state82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students77%
Females86%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability77%
English learner46%
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate80%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)81%
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate73%
Parent education - declined to state69%

Math

All Students91%
Females91%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged88%
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learner78%
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate90%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)96%
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to state77%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students74%
Females79%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino80%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)72%
Economically disadvantaged72%
Non-economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learner56%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate68%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)83%
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate80%
Parent education - declined to state83%

Math

All Students79%
Females74%
Males87%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino80%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learner73%
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate86%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)80%
Parent education - college graduate78%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate80%
Parent education - declined to state78%

Science

All Students72%
Females70%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino76%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learner49%
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate82%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate66%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to state67%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 64% 26%
Hispanic 18% 52%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 8% 11%
Two or more races 6% 3%
Black 4% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 44%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Judy Hession
Fax number
  • (818) 843-6077

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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720 East Providencia Avenue
Burbank, CA 91501
Phone: (818) 558-5460

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