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GreatSchools Rating

Eshelman Avenue Elementary School

Public | K-5

 

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Living in Lomita

Situated in an inner city neighborhood. The median home value is $402,500. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,500.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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13 reviews of this school


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Posted January 31, 2014

My child is a student here and for the past three years I've been extremely happy with all his teachers and the administration. His teachers have always been professional and caring. The principal has been nothing but supportive. This is a wonderful school. I'm disappointed to read such horrible reviews. To the neighbors who have renamed it "ghetto school": Why don't you attend a School Leadership Council Meeting and express your concerns? Everyone is welcome and if you're that miserable MOVE! There's plenty of other homes available in Lomita!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2013

Loud, Loud, Loud, uncouth. We neighbors of this mess have nicknamed it "ghetto elementary". Between the obnoxious double and triple parking, and the proclivity for parent to honk incessantly (as if a kid can't figure out by day 2 that the same parent in the same car at the same time is picking them up-duh), and the diaper throwing it's a nightmare. We have trash cans people, and we use OUR OWN driveways to come and go from our respective homes. Parents block driveways and leave litter everywhere. The school has good crossing guards, but their noise level offends daily. When it's not horns, its bullhorns and announcements. The entire neighborhood does NOT need to hear every announcement. I ran the PA system in High school, and I KNOW you can flick ONE SWITCH and only broadcast INSIDE the school. I am sorry to hear about the bullying issues and unsanitary diaper issues. It gives one the impression quickly these students will be the future incarcerated.


Posted January 8, 2013

Horrible school!!!! Principal is rude not only to parents but to STUDENTS!! They just started a new "policy." PARENTS ARE NOT ALLOWED TO ENTER SCHOOL WHEN DROPPING KIDS OFF...ONLY AT THE GATE. They've gone too far. I'm a PARENT AND SHOULD BE ABLE TO DROP OFF MY CHILD INSIDE NOT OUTSIDE! They do not ask for identification when picking up a child nor do they have staff at the front gate when school ends...so this policy is RIDICULOUS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 9, 2012

I'm a very concern parent about the safety of my children and others. I have seen dogs (pit bull and others) right next to the gate were I pick up my kids. On october31st. I saw a parent that brougt a dog into the building and told stuff in the office . on november 6th I spoke with the principal about my worries. (we had been attaced by dogs) my kids are so afraid of them. Mrs Parnel said she will do NOTHING about it. I told her she should look for the safety of our kids. What if they get bitten? she said then she will be responsable for it, but who is gonna suffer the pain and trauma have she thought about it. DO WE HAVE TO WAIT FOR A TRAGEDY TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT? Please no dogs around the school gates. I agree with other parents she was rude.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2012

I am beyond upset, disappointed, frustrated and angry with this school, Mostly the Principal, Vise principal and office staff. This staff at this school only cares about test scores as well as their (meaning principal) scores and rating for herself. I was told by the principal herself (Rhonda Pannell) that her focus is on her schools scores. Children get bullied daily there, potty in their pants and are forced to sit in it all day (refusing to call parents) get hurt or bullied and the lady s on the ground that are sup to watch and protect them shew them away while saying (go on go play I don t want to hear it) When a child is sent to the office for trouble no action is taken depending on the kid they do play favorites. There are a few good teachers; my problem is w the higher up, PRINCIPLE/OFFICE CREW...When a child is being bullied (hit, punched, kicked or even chocked pure physical stuff) Mrs. Pannell s response is, your kid getting bullied is not my problem, he/she needs to get over it, it s out of my hands! WTH!!! Our children are NOT SAFE at this school with her as a principle and her minions that follow her every word n move. There is much more to say but no room left.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 11, 2012

This school only cares about test scores and getting the funding no matter at what cost. The teachers have given up on the students and the system. The principal does not return phone calls. There is no accountability of any kind. It is always the students or parents fault. They get the scores by bullying, intimidation, put downs and making fun of them if they don't get it right away. If your child does not understand they are just put to the side to concentrate on the ones that do. Teachers put hands on kids to intimidate, scream, and curse. When you let the principal know she might transfer your child to a less agressive teacher however the cycle continues. Students are taught negative behavior and encourage to follow and use it with one another. The school will say all the right things and legal things about what they are going to do to make the situation better but there is no action to solve the problems. I advise parents not to send there kids here at all. It is not a happy, encouraging and safe environment. There is a bullying epidemic and they are not part of the solution based on actions.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 15, 2007

As a President of ELAC, I can say that all the staff are doing very well. Leadership -Principal and Vice Principal- have an excellent PMA. People who works at the office are very polite and available. Also some of them are bilingual (english-spanish) Same teachers care more than others, but all of them are available for academic issues. Mr. Ali is the music teacher. I saw his wonderful job in the last spring concert. All the parents enjoyed the way he trained the orchestra. It's a hard work well done. My son was in the 5th grade and they had very interesting field trips. One of them was a visit to the Ocean Institute. They dissected fish. Then, they used the microscope to investigate bacteria, plankton, etc. Also they went to Harbor Park to take samples about the water in the lake. Finally they made a Power Point presentation in the Ocean Institute.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 10, 2007

Wow, after reading those comments about Eshelman I am thinking my kids went to a different school. Both my kids attended Eshelman K-5. This was a few years ago, my son is graduating high school this year and my daughter is in 8th grade. I was so satisfied with their education they received from Eshelman. All the teachers they had were wonderful, both achieved high grades. The activities at the school were fine. My kids enjoyed the after-school program and singing in chorus. I was a TA for my son's 4th grade class and was at the school everyday, and was able to see what went on there. The only thing that concerned me was lunchtime. The kids were told not to talk while eating, I didn't think that was right to do, they can't talk in class, why not lunch? Thank you, Debbie Hernandez
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2006

My daughter attended Eshelman in the 3rd grade and the principal seemed to be more concerned with the test scores than the well being of the children. I will admit that they do have a good reading program. They don't want to do what it takes to teach a child that is having difficulty learning there curriculum. They only want to deal with the smart kids. I would never send any of my children back to Eshelman.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2005

My child went to this school for one year. The principal was not helpful at all and didn't listen to my child's teacher. I think that the communication between the principal and the teacher was not good at all. This affected my child's application procedure for Magnet school. However, the teachers was very helpful and tried to do her best.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 18, 2004

I have had my son at Eshelman since K. He is now in 4th grade. I have never been more disapointed in my life. This is a horrible school. They is no extra caricular activites for tthe children what so ever. They care nothing about parent involvement. All parent activities including Back to School, holiday programs and PTA meetings take place during the day. How can any working parent manage to attend? The administration is the worst I've ever seen. The office people are rude. They have a nurse only 2 times a week. ALthough I have never had a problem with any of my sons teachers, I can't imagine they are doing the best that they can with what little resources they receive from LA County Unified.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2004

This school has an excellent reading program that is unlike any that I have seen before. My son just turned 6 and is still in Kindergarden, but he has such a good understanding of sounds and how to turn those sounds into words or how to spell a word based on the sounds. He made such rapid progress. This program is from K-1st when they really learn how to read. I have a relative who is in 1st grade at another school and she does not know half as much as he does in his Kindergarten reading program. I am very impressed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2003

My child attended Eshelman from kindergarten through 5th grade. (I worked at the school for 2 of those years.) Of all the teachers she had during that 6 years she only encountered one who should not have been in that profession. The majority of the staff and professionals working there are great. However, I found that according most staff [believe] the child is 'guilty' until proven innocent; meaning that the adults assume the kids are only out to get away with something instead of simply being kids who may be making perfectly innocent mistakes. There are several Special Education classes offered on this campus and the teachers involved are some of the best I've even seen. Their students fairly blossom under their care. Overall, your child will have a great time at this school. And remember, the ultimate responsibility of your child's education lies with you their parent. The teachers can only do so much.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

822

Change from
2012 to 2013

-20

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

822

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-20

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
53%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
36%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

106 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
72%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
54%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
64%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students64%
Females78%
Males54%
African American61%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino65%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Non-economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability68%
English learner48%
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate67%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)64%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state71%

Math

All Students65%
Females71%
Males61%
African American44%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino68%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged66%
Non-economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability68%
English learner63%
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate87%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students45%
Females52%
Males39%
African American20%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learner29%
Fluent-English proficient and English only49%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate44%
Parent education - high school graduate29%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)43%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state49%

Math

All Students69%
Females67%
Males70%
African American53%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino68%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability70%
English learner76%
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate63%
Parent education - high school graduate71%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)64%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state67%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students65%
Females66%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino65%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged64%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability70%
English learner40%
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate63%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state77%

Math

All Students85%
Females86%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino86%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged86%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability86%
English learner75%
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate85%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students66%
Females77%
Males57%
African American67%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino68%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged65%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learner18%
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduate67%
Parent education - high school graduate72%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)60%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state45%

Math

All Students73%
Females74%
Males72%
African American42%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino78%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged72%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learner55%
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate67%
Parent education - high school graduate84%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state64%

Science

All Students53%
Females51%
Males54%
African American42%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino51%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged49%
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learner9%
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate48%
Parent education - high school graduate60%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)47%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state55%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 67% 52%
Black 15% 6%
White 11% 26%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 4% 11%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Two or more races 0% 3%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 38%N/A55%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012
The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) School Experience Survey asks parents, students and employees about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, engaging, safe, and collaborative. Learn more

We organized questions from the LAUSD School Experience Survey into five categories. The respondent group-level results (parents, students, and school employees) show the percent of each respondent group that agree or strongly agree that the school has positive results for that category.

Overall school results for each category are calculated by averaging across group-level results, ensuring that each respondent group is equally represented. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all LAUSD schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the LAUSD survey »Close
Based on 574 responses

This school provides ... 1

High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and students that agree to strongly agree that this school sets high academic expectations for its students and expects them to be college-bound. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Future Expectations (Parents), School Quality (Parents), Future Plans (Parents), Opportunities For Learning (Students), Future Plans (Students).

Close
 
This school
74%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
67%
 

Students

This school

 
80%
 
Healthy, respectful relationshipsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a positive learning environment and cultivates an atmosphere of respect. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Support (Students), Commitment and Collaboration (Employees), Satisfaction (Students), School Support (Students).

Close
 
This school
78%
agree
 

Students

This school

 
78%
 
A safe, clean and orderly environmentWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents, students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a well-kept facility and a safe environment conducive to learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Cleanliness (Employees), School Safety (Employees), Safety (Parents), School Cleanliness (Students), School Safety (Students).

Close
 
This school
73%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
87%
 

Students

This school

 
59%
 
Strong family engagementWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school engages parents and communicates with families to promote student learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: Parent Involvement (Employees), Feeling of Welcome (Parents), School Involvement (Parents), Teacher to Parent Communication (Parents).

Close
 
This school
66%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
66%
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents28351%
Students29195%

12012-13 Los Angeles Unified School District School Experience Survey

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Rhonda Pannell
Special schedule
  • Year-round
Fax number
  • (310) 326-2749

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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25902 Eshelman Avenue
Lomita, CA 90717
Website: Click here
Phone: (310) 326-1576

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