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GreatSchools Rating

Accelerated School

Charter | K-8 | 707 students

One of the first charter schools in Los Angeles, founded in 1994.

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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Principal leadership

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29 reviews of this school


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Posted May 29, 2014

I am the parent of a 4th grade student at The Accelerated School. My son has been at The Accelerated School since Kinder and he absolutely loves his school, especially his teacher Ms. Nguyen. Last year he attended Troy Camp, which is one of the many programs the school offers. The teachers always manage to find a variety of student activities at no cost to the parents. Some activities include Read to Succeed and The Colburn School. The Projects and Events Committee has done an amazing job all year long. My son really enjoyed being part of the TAS Talent Show, Spelling Bee, and Story Book Parade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2014

Two Words: Rigorous and Challenging! Elementary and Middle teachers at TAS truly understand the importance of preparing students for the rigorous demands of the Common Core State Standards and providing effective and engaging instruction that challenges students to think critically. I've seen students grow and blossom into competitive young scholars, ready to tackle the University of their Choice. Teachers are constantly reviewing student assessment data to ensure that students are making requisite growth. Talk about true Accountability.! All in all, if you want a public school that can provide your child with a challenging, enriching, and rigorous education, I think TAS is the place to be. I also really like the teachers. Teachers care, put on their A-Game for their students day in and day out, and their enthusiasm/passion for education is infectious. TAS is definitely a great place for young educators to grow into strong instructional leaders. Many teachers thrive here!


Posted May 28, 2014

TAS is a great school! Students are challenged and supported, teachers are professional and caring, and the administration keeps things running smoothly.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted June 8, 2013

I think this school has really fallen apart in the past few years. As a veteran student, being here from Kindergarten to 10th grade, this school is constantly changing its administrative positions, especially principals and assistant principals. They are very finicky about their rules and will allow certain rules on circumstantial events. Claims to be strict on uniform policies but allow students to substitute jeans for nave blue khakis (for middle school) and students to not wear uniform shirts. The school is more focus on discipline. Counselors are never found in their offices, but seen roaming the campus. Although the school is very well oriented on academics, they do tend to not renew the contracts of teachers who do well and teach their students. They plan on building a larger campus for ACES, which should really hold all elementary students from both TAS and ACES, to allow more room for the middle schoolers and WAHS. As I student at this school for 10+ years, this school has fallen far from the glory it once was.


Posted May 4, 2009

I 'have' been in love with this school since it's inception. I, however, have seen the model become distorted with red tape and power moves by administration. There have been so many teachers that have left. I am aware that there are many factors attributing to this. However, I share the beliefs of many many parents here and the overall feeling is that we are loosing too many teachers. Not to mention we are being promised things that have not occured. For one, the budget. We have been told over and over again that we would be GIVEN the budget. Now we are told that this is 'public' records and anyone can obtain them. That just feels really patronizing. I do believe that things are tough all over. I dont feel the board of directors nor the administration are in accord with the teachers, parents and students. What a shame.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2008

Not again! Another year of great staff leaving without any explanation, few opportunities for parent involvement in school decisions, and starting from scratch. Why can't the school administration hold on to great teachers and staff. Aren't parents supposed to be very involved in the decision-making in the accelerated school's model? Why are great programs like Early College being cut? I have had it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2008

The maj. of teachers my 7th grader has had the privilege of learning from in 2007-08 at TAS are outstanding educators. Ms. Perez, Mr. Lemus, Mr. Elkouby and Mr. Wong inspire their students to much higher levels in keeping with the Accelerated philosophy. There are multiple teachers with Masters Degress as well as several Phds, and it shows. Mr. Arellano is a fine, hands-on, thoughtful principal. The school is in fact large with 1300 hundred students from K-12 and yet the campus is run smoothly & professionally. I should also mention the patience and sincerity of the front office who are wonderful. I am grateful that my child had this excellent experience and regret that we must relocate. If you live anywhere near downtown LA, no matter what your ethnicity or income level, you will not find a better LAUSD option. I know, I tried.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2008

The idealogy of the school is wonderful. Many parents complain about changes that take place at the school and their lack of participation is to blame. Since the No Child Left Behind campaign, I have seen a decrease in creative teaching curriculum. This is not directly the fault of the faculty, rather the policy enforced by having to keep the 'scores' up. To speak of teacher turnover, it is not a huge number. There are many factors that come into play when dealing with teacher turnover. Salary, teaching styles, and administration are just pieces of the puzzle. Since The Accelerated School is a charter school, the teachers are on Yearly contracts. Something that is 'across-the-board' for all charter schools. The primary function of a charter school is to introduce the Family as a unit to actively participate, most complaints are from parents who refuse to participate.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2008

I love the school and all the staff!! Everyone here understands family and it is personified everyday here. I do not appreciate unfounded complaints by parents who refuse to really participate in the infastructure. I go to meetings and become frustrated when I hear complaints from parents who do not participate in the social model but were begging and hoping to get their children into the program. It is not fair to all who do actively participate in bettering the school, have to be subjected to ridicule from parents who are lacking the time to spend at the school. To be perfectly frank, these are the same parents who wait until the end of the school year to volunteer their time here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 1, 2008

this school is a great school that helps both the students and parents achieve higher learning. although there are some flaws about it, like any great school, it also has great advantages. the only way we can truly make tas a great school is if we all put our best into it. not just the teachers and staff but the students and parents as well. we must all work together to make tas a great school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 13, 2007

We have been part of the TAS family for over 6 years. The school was great, but in the last 3 or 4 years the school has taken a turn for the worse. It lacks in quality teachers, some of the staff are unprofessional and lack common sense and you never know what to expect from TAS, they'll tell you one thing and do something totally different. There are some positive things about TAS, it has no gang problems inside the school and since the school is small, it's easy to get to know other families. The teacher and staff turnover ratio is alarming. It seems that all of the good teachers leave. The school was once a Times Magazine School of the Year and now it's a school that's on a Performance Improving Plan. I'm still hoping it will bounce back, but things seems to get worse every year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 26, 2007

It's true that there has been an increasing communication gap between the parents and the administrators during the monthly mandatory meetings. What concerns me is the lack of linguistic resources and the wait time incurred by the Latino Family communities, whom already experience feelings of alienation and marginalia, during these meetings. If TAS is truly serious about meeting the needs of all in it's learning community, there needs to be more attention to, communication about and thoughtful facilitation of the same materials covered and discussed in the English-Only Meetings (In Spanish).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2007

The Accelerated School has grown from a small elementary campus to a multiple program network. The growth can cause families to feel a loss of closseness, however, the growth has allowed families to have their students in one school preK-12th grade. Challenges exist, but there are wonderful people at work here--we have great administrators, teachers, students and families. It is a school of choice and this choice may not be for everyone. You have to work hard and be involved. Teachers in the middle and high school work tremendously long hours; students are expected to work hard as well; parents are expected to support all of this hard work. If you're up for hard work--this is the place.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 10, 2007

Our daughter is almost finished with her first year of kindergarten this year and our experience at TAS so far has been wonderful. The teachers are great and I think the future looks bright for the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 15, 2007

I have had three years experience with TAS. During those years, I have watched big dreams and big ideas give way to high turnover, all too rapid growth, and lack of academic progress. This school with a wonderful vision and outstanding teachers needs to hold on to their educators and promote quality learning from the ground up. I hope that TAS can turn around this downward trend and return to their former successes.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 3, 2007

I was so excited when my two children where excepted at TAS 4 years ago, until now. Articles mean nothing if you have nothing to back it up. Administrators feel they can change the rules on us, without alerting us. Can you really trust a school with this type of attitude?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 5, 2006

I am a teacher at this school. We have an amazing staff of dedicated teachers-going home early means well after 5:00pm on most days! The families are dedicated, valued and are very visible in the classroom. Children can start in pre-K and stay with us until they gratuate from 12th grade. We focus on the whole child, not just the three R's, although those are strong. Children are nurtured in their emotional, physical and artistic development as well as in their intellectual growth. If you care about your child's future, run, don't walk to this school!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted June 14, 2006

This school seems to be only concerned about how they look 'on paper' and the importance of the children has falling through the cracks.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2006

This is a school that grew to fast. Intentions were good but they underestemated the students and parents. The lottery process is awful because you never know what you are going to get alot of these kids were awful. They desroyed the new school and deystroyed the spirit of the school. The adminstration has had why to much turn over. So nothing has been consistent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 15, 2006

I am an Instructional Assistant at TAS. In recent months The Accelerated School has undergone a huge amount of growth. This raises a lot of concern with me about the quality of education and the sense of community at the school. The teachers are doing what they can with classes that sometimes are as big at 36 students. In order for the school to work better under the current strain, it truly demands full participation from the families both in and out of the classroom. Parents need to volunteer in their kids classrooms , attend all parent meetings, and support their kids academically and personally at home.
—Submitted by a staff


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

773

Change from
2012 to 2013

+6

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

773

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+6

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

3 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
22%

2010

 
 
45%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
32%

2010

 
 
35%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
40%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
40%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
49%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
31%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
40%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
46%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
28%

2010

 
 
29%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
25%

2011

 
 
11%

2010

 
 
32%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
57%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
0%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
18%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
60%
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
75%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students65%
Females82%
Males49%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino66%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged65%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learner47%
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate53%
Parent education - high school graduate75%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state75%

Math

All Students64%
Females79%
Males49%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged64%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learner47%
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate42%
Parent education - high school graduate81%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students29%
Females36%
Males20%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino24%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability30%
English learner3%
Fluent-English proficient and English only49%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate6%
Parent education - high school graduate14%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state45%

Math

All Students47%
Females47%
Males47%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino51%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged47%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learner38%
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate47%
Parent education - high school graduate36%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)60%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state42%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students52%
Females56%
Males48%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged53%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learner26%
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate44%
Parent education - high school graduate41%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state79%

Math

All Students67%
Females75%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged68%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability72%
English learner48%
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate65%
Parent education - high school graduate50%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students69%
Females63%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino73%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability68%
English learner53%
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate80%
Parent education - high school graduate62%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)72%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students54%
Females49%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability53%
English learner24%
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate47%
Parent education - high school graduate62%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)56%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students33%
Females20%
Males48%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability33%
English learner18%
Fluent-English proficient and English only38%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate47%
Parent education - high school graduate31%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)28%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students52%
Females54%
Males49%
African American50%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino52%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability53%
English learner33%
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate39%
Parent education - high school graduate42%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state61%

Math

All Students52%
Females52%
Males51%
African American43%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learner39%
Fluent-English proficient and English only55%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate46%
Parent education - high school graduate50%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)62%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state56%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students54%
Females67%
Males41%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino56%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged56%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learner11%
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate47%
Parent education - high school graduate60%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)64%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state43%

Math

All Students44%
Females53%
Males34%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino46%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged45%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability46%
English learner16%
Fluent-English proficient and English only51%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate41%
Parent education - high school graduate31%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)57%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state47%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students41%
Females48%
Males31%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability42%
English learner30%
Fluent-English proficient and English only45%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate33%
Parent education - high school graduate27%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)61%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state44%

English Language Arts

All Students47%
Females56%
Males33%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino46%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged47%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learner29%
Fluent-English proficient and English only53%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate52%
Parent education - high school graduate45%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state44%

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students41%
Females45%
Males37%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disability17%
Students with no reported disability45%
English learner29%
Fluent-English proficient and English only47%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate45%
Parent education - high school graduate42%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state30%

Science

All Students57%
Females61%
Males51%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino56%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged57%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability62%
English learner31%
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate50%
Parent education - high school graduate56%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)63%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state58%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 91%
Black 8%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 97%N/AN/A
English language learners 39%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
PE instructor(s)
Nurse(s)
Reading specialist(s)
Security personnel
Special education coordinator
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Tutor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Awards

Community service awards received in the past 3 years
  • CCSA's Legacy Award for Operators (2013)

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Intensive - the school offers a full program for many needs and/or offers at least one very comprehensive program for very challenging needs such as autism or complete visual impairment
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Cognitive disability
  • Emotional behavioral disabilities
  • Hearing impairments
  • Other health impairments
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
  • Visual impairments
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse

Arts & music

School facilities
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Rock band
Clubs
  • Arts and crafts
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Intensive - the school offers a full program for many languages and/or offers at least one very comprehensive program school-wide for at least 25% of our population
Languages supported by ESL/ELL programs
  • Spanish
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
School leaders can update this information here.

School basics

School start time
  • 8:00 am
School end time
  • 3:00 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school: ends at 6:00 p.m.
School Leader's name
  • Lenita Lugo, Principal
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Special schedule
  • Year-round
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (323) 235-6346

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • College prep
  • Core knowledge
  • Direct instruction
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
  • Hybrid
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • None
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Intensive - the school offers a full program for many needs and/or offers at least one very comprehensive program for very challenging needs such as autism or complete visual impairment
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Cognitive disability
  • Emotional behavioral disabilities
  • Hearing impairments
  • Other health impairments
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
  • Visual impairments
Foreign languages taught
  • None
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Intensive - the school offers a full program for many languages and/or offers at least one very comprehensive program school-wide for at least 25% of our population
Languages supported by ESL/ELL programs
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Reading specialist(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Special education coordinator
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
  • Tutor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
  • Counseling
  • Mentoring
  • Remediation
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
  • Tutoring
Transportation options
  • None
School facilities
  • Audiovisual aids
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Parent center
  • Performance stage
  • Playground
Partnerships with local resources and organizations
School leaders can update this information here.

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • After School Dance
  • Basketball
  • Flag football
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Rock band
Performing arts
  • None
Media arts
  • None

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Arts and crafts
  • Yearbook
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Coach sports teams or extracurricular activities
  • Free Parenting Workshops
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?

Students typically come from these schools
W. M. Keck Early Learning Center

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Wallis Annenberg High School
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

4000 South Main Street
Los Angeles, CA 90037
Website: Click here
Phone: (323) 235-6343

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