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GreatSchools Rating

Castlebay Lane Charter School

Charter | K-5

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 7 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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49 reviews of this school


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Posted Wednesday, September 10, 2014

I had a child that was bussed to Frost during the sprinkler malfunction. It is my understanding, Frost teachers and administration were extremely welcoming and accommodating. The Castlebay principal was beyond helpful and communication was forth coming at every step, including the all-call that went out the night before. If ANY parent was uninformed with regard to the details, they have only their self to blame as information was distributed verbally, electronically and telephonically. Castlebay's principal and teachers handled this problem with grace, as did Frost's principal and faculty.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted Wednesday, September 10, 2014

One thing I agree with on the 2 star comment is that teachers at Castlebay are amazing and we couldn t ask for more, but all the other information is inaccurate. The principal sent out a voice message the same night of the incident, I think around 9pm, with available information to all the parents.The message contained details about the incident.That same day, the principal spent her whole day and night helping at school and packing everything teachers and students will need at the other school.It is sad to see how someone can put so much effort and time into something, and still at the end not be appreciated and only be criticized.Could you ask for a better leadership?Next morning the principal met parents at the MPR and explained the situation with details.Flyers were sent out home the very first day with detailed explanations.My kid was also going to the other school, & from the first day, everything was amazingly smooth and perfect thanks to our principal.This is life, things happen, and our principal one more time proved to be the BEST one can ever wish for.She had it all planned and under control.Can t thank her enough for being such a great leader and an amazing person!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Regarding the flooding at our school. Our principal Victoria Littlejohn packed each teacher's class room effected by the flooding. Her hard work in the wee hours throughout the night enabled us to start near normal classroom teaching instruction in our temporary classrooms at Frost by 9:19am that morning. She divided her time between both schools making sure everyone's needs were taken care of and that we all felt still like a "family." The transition back to our home school went smoothly- I personally spoke with LAUSD executives who praised Ms. Littlejohn's strong leadership throughout this ordeal! I am grateful to be able to truly know that we are all in capable hands should any emergency arise in the future. This is one remarkable principal!!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 6, 2014

It is very unfortunate that the previous 2 star posting is inaccurate, (well, except the part about the amazing teachers agreed!). The principal actually sent out a phone message around 9pm to the entire school the very night (Wed night) of the incident and notified everyone which building was impacted and that children would be relocated the next day. The 2nd morning of relocation, an eblast email went out to the entire school at 9:46 am completely explaining the situation. Flyers were sent home with students. It is unfortunate that the prior parent didn t receive ANY of these communications the first couple days. The principal had at least 2 impromptu parent meetings in the office and then the MPR on the first and third mornings of relocation. When parents brought legitimate concerns (without exaggeration) to her on the third day of relocation, she immediately made sure they were addressed for the next day.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2014

I couldn't disagree more with the previous post. I have to give credit to all the TEACHERS at Castlebay. (5 stars for the teachers) As mentioned, there was a sprinkler malfunction at this school. However, the principal could and should have approached the situation much better. Very disappointed. Communication was not very clear with the parents until days later (in fact there was no immediate word/no voice message/no email of any sort until days later). Some of the 2nd and 3rd grade students were being bussed to Frost middle school (nightmare for some). But as usual, the principal glossed over any of the legitimate concerns parents had, put on her politician-like smiley face, and if anything, was not visible during this crucial time when things were so unclear and chaotic. I give all credit to the teachers who were soooo flexible and willing to come everyday, NO MATTER WHERE they were teaching, and CARING for our students. Thank you teachers of Castlebay!! All props go to you! I totally give 5+ stars to the teachers here. They are so dedicated to what they do.


Posted February 13, 2014

What a wonderful school this is. The parents and staff all worked together to make sure that the instructional time is the best.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2014

This is a phenomenal school. It's unfortunate that parents would jump up and give the entire school one star based upon the fact that the LAUSD was going to bring in a federally mandated program - a program that won't be coming to Castlebay this year after all. But, the teachers, the staff, the kids and the parents are really dedicated and the parent group works very hard to make the school the best that it can be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 30, 2013

I am a student at this school, and I love mr mena! I am so fortunate to have him. He is really a cool teacher!! All my teachers , and all the teachers are very advanced. Mrs. Littlejohn, the principal, believes in everyone's potential, too. This is the best school ever, I tell you, BEST!!!!!!


Posted September 11, 2013

We love Mr. Mena couldn't of asked for a better teacher , my child actually enjoys going to school and learning ...every child should be lucky to have him !! Mrs. Dorfman is also another favorite ...and a great new addition to the school , mrs. Littlejohn , she's brought so many wonderful changes to our school. From a happy parent :-)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2013

This is a great school and they have some very experienced teachers. My son had Mrs Buchanan last year and she does a lot of extra things in her class, incorporating stuff she's taught in upper level grades. My son still amazes me with stuff he's learned from her class. Ms Littlejohn, the principal is very personable and attentive to the students. She has brought improvements to the school, in small ways, like keeping the campus clean, increasing security measures (even before Sandy Hook), and recognizing outstanding students over the PA system. Parent involvement also has a lot to do with the success of the school and in this area, it can vary from class to class and year to year. Students get so much more when their parents are involved and engaged. There are many opportunities for helping out, but sometimes it seems it always the same small group that is pitching in. (unfortunately, I don't agree with the other review below - if that was years ago with other players involved, that should be discounted. As a parent, I'd want to know how the school is rated, now, not 10+ years ago).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 2, 2012

Castlebay is a very pretty school situated in a "nice" area. It has a lot of pros and a few cons. Pros: Parent involvement is great and kids come to school ready to learn. Very dedicated teaching staff. Good principal. Good test scores. Has an intimate, small school feeling. Cons: Not enough emphasis is put on remediation within the general education program with an over reliance on special education to meet this need. Just became an affiliated charter and has not figured out how to make the most of this new status (yet). Overall- very good school with a trend towards improvement.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 22, 2012

I agree with the previous parent's comment more than 100 percent about the on site after school care provided by YMCA. The service is horrible. The staff does not care about the children at all. They just sit and chat and the children can do anythining of their own. They only provide one hour to do the homework and rush the kids to finish so they can play outside and the staff can sit under a tree and enjoy chatting and relaxing. Castlebay Y is not a good afterschool program at all. I decided to take my child out and to place in a more professional after school program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2012

The school itself is good. One of the best in the North Valley - strong involvment from parents, mostly great teachers and administrators (the new principal is great). The problem is with the onsite afterschool childcare by YMCA. The Y staff is nice but young and inexperienced. I often see kids playing way far from the building, sometimes out of sight from where the staff members are sitting and chatting under the tree. The monthly fees are not cheap for the hours they provide care and yet, parents are asked to do donations and pay for misc. things. Recently we paid for the cost of new earthquake kit which the squirrels got into and ate some food in it. We were told it is mandatory to pay because they are required to have these kits. If it's mandatory for a childcare center to have earthquake kits, shouldn't they be responsible for them? For those working parents, you might as well consider paying a bit more and send your kids to an affordable private school with better afterschool care.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2011

Castlebay is a wonderful school. It's a wonderful place to grow up during your youngest childhood years, in a community of caring parents, inspiring teachers, and experienced administration. The good family values taught at home really show in the attitudes and behaviors of the students. The academics as well as the social atmosphere is absolutely wonderful - my son has tested with an IQ of 154 (highly-gifted genius level), and he simply thrives here with the support of his teachers and his wonderful friends. Not only does he get his academic challenge, but he learns how to communicate with others in a very healthy way -- which is extremely important, especially important, for a person with such intellectual giftedness. Part of it, is because he is not alone. Lots of kids at Castlebay are tested into the "gifted" category. My son has friends with whom he can share his interests in nature and science and building with, and at the same time, he also has friends who teach him what "good friendship" is all about. The kids at Castlebay are the most amazing thing about this school - more so, than their curriculum or parent involvement or test scores. WE LOVE THIS PLACE!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 20, 2011

.We want to love this school but there are some obstacles. The positive: This school is surrounded by a great community with caring parents who donate time, talent, ideas and money like nowhere else. There is a culture among the parents that education is VERY important and that is why this school performs well (on paper). There is an abundance of parent participation. Also, a nice enrichment program to help round out the children's education and provide afterschool activities. For a school with a great a reputation, there is a surprising lack of pride. Sadly, we have found some of the teachers seem to be winding up their career and are simply going through the motions. There is little respect shown to the students by some faculty. The children are herded through the campus and spoken to like farm animals. Budget cuts seem to be a daily theme. If only this staff would realize respecting the students and treating them well didn't cost any money. Kids are obviously getting an adequate education. However, we've seen little inspiration and the school seems to lack "heart." Could be an amazing school with some visionary leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2010

I love the how everyone is interested in making our kids succeed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2010

Great teachers and staff, smart students, and dedicated parents!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 9, 2009

Both of my children went to this school and the teaching staff if unbeatable. First grade teachers make the class fun and challenging. No better teacher at the school then Mrs. Fernandes, (dedicated to each of her students and always available to parents) unfortunately she passed away this year. Ms. Wiley and Ms Genna are both excellent choices
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2009

Great choice for elementary school. The teachers were some of the best that my daughter has ever had. After being quite successful due to Mr. Moore and Dr. Field's help my daughter went off to an extinguished private middle and high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2009

Castlebay School is the best among LAUSD schools by far with a superior excellent principal, but is definetly behind if compared to private schools. Our kid attended the Kindergarten and was a great learning experince. However, 1st grade was a disaster for all as the learning curve took a dive. The high rating is only achieved because the parents teach the kids extra at home and at Kumon classes otherwise the school rating is no better than Germain. Teachers grade the kids depending on parents social activity in class and not on child's own academics. To save our child we moved to a private school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

939

Change from
2012 to 2013

-13

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

939

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-13

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

120 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

120 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
78%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

106 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

111 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
79%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students87%
Females87%
Males86%
African Americann/a
Asian91%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino82%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)94%
Parent education - college graduate85%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females89%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino76%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)76%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students77%
Females85%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asian81%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino69%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)46%
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students90%
Females87%
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asian94%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino75%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)62%
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students92%
Females92%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino76%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability97%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)79%
Parent education - college graduate96%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students100%
Females98%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability99%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only99%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)100%
Parent education - college graduate98%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students86%
Females87%
Males84%
African Americann/a
Asian93%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disability82%
Students with no reported disability86%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females85%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino72%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disability75%
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented98%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students82%
Females78%
Males86%
African Americann/a
Asian90%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino59%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disability82%
Students with no reported disability82%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented98%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)62%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 47%
Asian 30%
Hispanic 15%
Black 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 10%N/AN/A
English language learners 11%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012
The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) School Experience Survey asks parents, students and employees about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, engaging, safe, and collaborative. Learn more

We organized questions from the LAUSD School Experience Survey into five categories. The respondent group-level results (parents, students, and school employees) show the percent of each respondent group that agree or strongly agree that the school has positive results for that category.

Overall school results for each category are calculated by averaging across group-level results, ensuring that each respondent group is equally represented. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all LAUSD schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the LAUSD survey »Close
Based on 576 responses

This school provides ... 1

High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and students that agree to strongly agree that this school sets high academic expectations for its students and expects them to be college-bound. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Future Expectations (Parents), School Quality (Parents), Future Plans (Parents), Opportunities For Learning (Students), Future Plans (Students).

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This school
75%
agree
 
District average
72%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
73%
 

District average

 
70%
 

Students

This school

 
76%
 

District average

 
74%
 
Healthy, respectful relationshipsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a positive learning environment and cultivates an atmosphere of respect. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Support (Students), Commitment and Collaboration (Employees), Satisfaction (Students), School Support (Students).

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This school
83%
agree
 
District average
77%
agree
 

Students

This school

 
80%
 

District average

 
74%
 

Employees

This school

 
86%
 

District average

 
81%
 
A safe, clean and orderly environmentWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents, students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a well-kept facility and a safe environment conducive to learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Cleanliness (Employees), School Safety (Employees), Safety (Parents), School Cleanliness (Students), School Safety (Students).

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This school
80%
agree
 
District average
70%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
91%
 

District average

 
78%
 

Students

This school

 
68%
 

District average

 
58%
 

Employees

This school

 
79%
 

District average

 
74%
 
Strong family engagementWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school engages parents and communicates with families to promote student learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: Parent Involvement (Employees), Feeling of Welcome (Parents), School Involvement (Parents), Teacher to Parent Communication (Parents).

Close
 
This school
74%
agree
 
District average
68%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
69%
 

District average

 
66%
 

Employees

This school

 
80%
 

District average

 
71%
 
Teacher support and opportunities for collaborationWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of employees that agree to strongly agree that this school ensures that teachers work well together, learn from one another, have opportunities for professional development and feel supported by the administration. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: Evaluation (Employees), Opportunities for Involvement (Employees), Professional Development (Employees), Resource Allocation (Employees), Teacher Collaboration and Data Use (Employees).

Close
 
This school
53%
agree
 
District average
66%
agree
 

Employees

This school

 
53%
 

District average

 
66%
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents25143%
Students31091%
Employees1525%

12012-13 Los Angeles Unified School District School Experience Survey

This school has not yet provided program information.


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19010 Castlebay Lane
Northridge, CA 91326
Website: Click here
Phone: (818) 360-1908

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