Students enrolled 414
School leader Mr. Francois Guedenet

Contact this school

151 Laura Lane
Palo Alto, CA 94303

(650) 251-8500
Nearby homes for sale
Map of International School Of The Peninsula address.

3 stars
Based on 55 ratings

Let others know what you
think about this school

October 24, 2014
We have had children at this school for 4 years. I have been impressed with the teachers and the program that they run - we are part of the french. Unfortunately, the administrative staff are awful. They really could care less about the parents and their concerns, the lower schools admin staff is a joke, the principle at that school is clearly uncomfortable dealing with parents and in particular if the there is an issue. The worst part of it is you only have a voice with these people if you donate in excess of the gap. They don't seem to be concerned with the students, they seem to be concerned with the excessive amount they ask for as a donation. It is really a sad group of leadership. We will be pulling our children from the school in the coming year and plan to have them part of a new community which while still private does not revolve around the amounts of donation but instead on the volunteerism of the parents, eliminating the need for the excessive admin staff but also involving the whole family in the education of our children. Letting our children learn not just from excellent teachers, but from excellent parents who lead by an example. Not a popularity contest.

- submitted by a parent
July 02, 2014
Unlike the prior reviewer, my experience with the school has been completely positive. When we investigated school choices for our children, ISTP was the most open and responsive one we looked at. The admissions department took a lot of time with us to explain the school's mission and approach to education. After we enrolled, as we had questions ranging from simple school day logistics to broader matters of curriculum, the teachers, staff and school leadership went out of their way to provide answers. The school is a great and unique institution. Its a rare combination of a warm, nurturing environment with a focus on rigorous academics. The school has an immersion, bi-lingual approach (French or Mandarin), but rather than just being a language school, it views its mission as teaching through language (rather than just teaching a language) and instilling a global mindset. Fluency in the chosen second language is an important outcome, but the philosophy also centers on the intellectual and cognitive benefit as children work hard to express themselves and solve problems in multiple languages. We've been very happy with ISTP and would recommend it strongly to other parents.

- submitted by a parent
July 02, 2014
Both my children graduated from ISTP and received a first rate education. Not only are they bilingual, but they were very well prepared for a rigorous high school curriculum. ISTP has a close-knit and supportive community. The administration does an excellent job stewarding the school's resources.

- submitted by a parent
June 25, 2014
Unsatisfactory administration including admissions department which is downright misleading and arrogant. Mixed quality of teachers

- submitted by a parent
June 04, 2013
The good: The teachers, kids and parents at the school are great. However, the teachers get held back by the administration. For example, if a child in kindergarden asks the teacher to learn to read, the answer will be that they are not allowed to. On the lower campus there is a lot of tension between the teachers and the director. The administration takes decisions that are not in the interest of the children such as assigning teachers to classes they are not qualified to teach (For example: a nursery teacher assigned to a 1st grade class. It's a good thing the teacher was wise enough to refuse the position) Fundraising is in the center of school activities and the children are also solicited to get the parents to donate to the school. If you are looking for your children to learn a second language, it's a great school. The kids and parents are fantastic. But be prepared to battle with the administration.

- submitted by a parent
May 31, 2013
Fantastic teachers and community of parents. It is a great way to get the kids to learn a foreign language (French or Chinese). The little ones love to go have fun there while learning about the world. Unfortunately the administration is much more focused on fundraising activities and politics rather than children education. The school lost quite a few good teachers because of the administration. I guess it confirms that even in education principal leadership is key.

- submitted by a parent
February 19, 2013
Our child is in the elementary school program, and so far we have had a good experience with the school. The administration and faculty are responsive, devoted to the idea of bilingual education and very much want to create a lasting and unique educational institution. The school does not have the endowment of other private schools in the area, but nor does the school want to become a haven for primarily wealthy families. This does create some robust fundraising efforts, but we haven't noticed any more pressure than at other private schools, and probably less. That simply is a fact of life for a school that views itself as having a particular mission (bilingualism, global outlook and academic preparation) that does not draw as widely as a traditional school.

- submitted by a parent
January 22, 2013
We joined ISTP when my daughter entered pre-k in the mandarin immersion program. Ten years have passed and the promise and benefits of a bi-lingual education in combination with rigorous academics has been fulfilled. ISTP has prepared her well to take on the challenges ahead academically, socially and emotionally. The Chinese program has matured significantly during our tenure. The Chinese teachers are excellent from Nursery to Eighth. We have travelled to China, and it is easy to see her language competence and confidence. Whether her mandarin skills will be important professionally or simply personally, it is a wonderful gift for her to know both the Chinese language and culture. Regarding overall academics, she got the attention she needed, at each grade across all subjects, to be the best student possible. Homework is demanding but rarely overwhelming. There is time for other activities besides homework, and to go to bed on time. The small classes allow kids and parents to really get to know each other. The parent community is vibrant and warm, everyone bonded together to make ISTP a great school and experience for all the kids. We are happy that we made ISTP our choice!

- submitted by a parent
January 22, 2013
I have two children at ISTP, both of whom started in Pre-K. As non-Mandarin Chinese speakers, we believe we have given our children a great gift in not only a great education through ISTP but also in the ability to be poly- literate and polylingual. ISTP is the best at what it does. In reading the reviews, I think it is disingenuous that many have posted incorrect facts. They are flat out wrong. ISTP has practices that are normal for independent schools regarding fundraising, education, and budget. The school is managed financially conservatively and has grown its enrollment to an all-time high, an endorsement by parents who believe ISTP is THE best choice for their children. ISTP offers a school that emphasizes education first, and uses multiple languages through which to teach. Arts, collaboration, and special attention to social-emotional learning are all hallmarks of this great Nursery through 8th grade school. Before making a decision on where you send your child to school, please research to find the best fit for your family. We have have found the COMMUNITY of parents to be one of the best aspects of this experience. We count them as our closest friends today.

- submitted by a parent
January 17, 2013
My eldest daughter graduated from the french program last year and my youngest is in french elementary. Both joined the school in pre-K and have attended both campuses. My husband and I couldn't be more pleased with the quality of the school. The teachers are supportive and caring, but most of all they are teaching our children to THINK. The complaint I hear from friends from other schools is that there is too much memorization and not enough critical thinking. ISTP teaches children how to think for themselves and to solve problems. On the rare occasion our girls struggled with courses, the teachers never let them fall behind, they always did something proactive to help them succeed, to keep them on par with their classmates. As for the attrition rate, while every year we lose one or two kids to other schools, this mostly this seems to be a result of the difficulties experienced by non-french parents trying to keep up with their kids' french-language homework. That said, there are plenty of tutors to help. Bottom line: I highly recommend this school to anyone who wants their kids to have a bilingual education. It's worth every penny.

- submitted by a parent
January 17, 2013
Our experience from the Chinese program. The school is undergoing an expansion, building a new site, costing 20 million dollars. The administration refuses to borrow and has little endowment, so the pressure is on parents to donate money. The emphasize of the principal is money and his legacy, his staff support this mission, or is out the door. While at this school, we felt endless pressure to conform, donate money, and please. Teachers are evaluated on how much money they raise. The amount each family donate is public information, printed in a booklet and mailed to each household. The teachers criticized kids' smallest infractions with exaggerated reaction, and on a daily basis bombarded parents with issues. My child's confidence, and our sanity were constantly under attack. What little issues my child had, the teachers blew it up and made it worse, not better. After our child left and joined a different school, we were surprised at how kind, fair, positive, and skillful the teachers are at the new school.

- submitted by a parent
January 14, 2013
There have been 5 different Chinese section directors at the school since 2001. Unfortunately, these changes in leadership do affect the direction and spirit of the program. There is a resultant lack of oversight and vision for the Mandarin section. The administration is fairly dysfunctional (from the parent perspective, the French and Chinese administration seemed always at odds - perhaps one reason the directors leave?) This in turn affects the teachers with the final trickle down to the students. I wish our experience at this school had been good because, in theory, a bilingual education is a wonderful thing. In actuality,it is inconsistent from year to year, sometimes good, sometimes out right awful depending on the combination of teacher and current director. Social/emotional development is given only lip service, unless you happen to be the child of a major donor and then your emotional well being is considered above that of other children. Bullying is otherwise generally ignored. Instruction in the lower grades is solid, but once in the upper grades, it deteriorates. This is reflected in poor test scores and poor placement into private middle schools.

- submitted by a parent
October 15, 2012
Finding the right school for your child is no small task. If you are looking for a rigorous school that strikes balance between academics and social / emotional growth, consider ISTP. We have two kids and this is our third year at the school. The elementary program has a strong program, and the real strength is the true bilingualism these students acquire. The middle school is where we find the school really shines. The principal is outstanding and a true leader. Academically, teachers push students to their best, and the students strive. Graduates are well received by leading high schools. This is not just a language school. It is a school where children learn about other cultures and the world. Finally, the parents in this community work together to help make this an amazing community.

- submitted by a parent
September 23, 2012
A neighbor who is considering enrolling her daughter asked me my opinion about some of the posted reviews, knowing how much my kids and I love the school. All I can say is that those who leave with a negative impression are the proverbial squeaky-wheels, and I can only sympathize with their unfortunate experience. I'm sure that no school is perfect for every child, but having had kids who have gone through nursery to middle school, all I can say is that they have received superior academic preparation (got into all advanced classes in high school). More importantly, not only are they tri-lingual, they have experiences unparalleled to most other students, whether it's from daily exposure to multiple cultures, or from international school trips ( China, Costa Rica, France!). The teachers are more than qualified to teach such a curriculum, and the parent community is fabulous.

- submitted by a parent
September 20, 2012
I have two children at ISTP and I'm a bit shocked by some of the reviews. My children are in the Chinese program and I've had great experiences with the teachers and staff. The teachers are truly and honestly the best, both Chinese and English. They are exceptional and have shown real care for my children. I think what we all want is for our children to be happy at school, and I can 100% say that my children are. Compared to their friends that are not at ISTP, they are at grade level in English and math. But what they have that their friends don't Chinese! As for facilities, the Cowper campus was recently renovated and it's great. The classrooms are spacious and the outdoor space is amazing.

- submitted by a parent
August 29, 2012
Research thoroughly your decision to attend this school. Academically, standardized test scores in both the elementary & middle school are low. When asked to see current test scores, the administration shared old data. Although bi-lingual schools can academically lag English-only schools, parents who left for other schools said academically, their kids needed lots of extra tutoring. Instilling a joy & love of learning, it is not practiced at all. The French teachers motivate kids negatively, ie yelling, berating, & humiliating them & sometimes causing them cry. The admin speaks of "teaching emotional intelligence", "building leaders', "teaching positive risk taking", but in practice it doesn't exist. When issues are raised, they are dismissed/unresolved w/out teacher accountability. Overall, attrition rates are high, test scores are low, teaching methodology is archaic & out dated, & teachers & administration have questionable backgrounds. Find & speak to families that have left. Bottom line, if you have goals of your child attending a top American university, do not go here. There are many positive, proven, alternatives in the area to teach your child Chinese or French.

- submitted by a parent
February 20, 2012
I still believe what children learn at this school are great. However, my experiences at Cowper campus were lots of shocking surprises. When we just started, I met parents who had already been at school told me "Why did you chose here? We are thinking to leave this school.." It seems people do leave and the number of students in higher grades are very small. From my own experience at Cowper I think they should consider to improve in administrative area. It was shocking to me that my child came back home from school with some food and drinks, sometimes ate/drunk something already at school, which I never want my child to eat/drink. They have snack list, but they give students food/drinks not listed and not informed to parents in advance. When children get sick, they let such children sit at the end of the corridor facing to the entrance door where everyone is passing by. Once I saw a child who looked like almost vomiting was sitting there with a trash bin placed in front of him. They do not have a proper room to treat such sick or injured children. When my child got injured, they did not treat properly either and I was very sad. They didn't apologize for whatever happened either.

- submitted by a parent
August 26, 2011
Our child is in the French program in the middle school section, taking Chinese for the first time as a third language. The middle school Chinese teacher is absolutely phenomenal. My child comes back home happy, eager to communicate in what little Chinese he knows of, and is excited even about doing homework. Which brings me to my point: this school is doing an amazing job in cultivating not only linguistic competency--bilingualim, trilingualism and what not--but also the love of learning. I see my child enjoying everyday and every moment in school. What more can I ask for as a parent?

- submitted by a parent
June 22, 2011
ERB scores are an important measure of achievement, comparable to the STAR testing in public schools. Despite the fact that kids are learning everything in two languages here, ISTP still has scores ABOVE the average in Math and English for urban private schools (the higher level of ERB test scores). Language tests also score higher than at other private schools for both French and Mandarin testing. A win-win situation given that the children receive excellent character development and global citizenship examples from their teachers.

- submitted by a parent
April 18, 2011
We have found the school lacking in many aspects. Our daughter has been in the Chinese program for past 4 years. Greatest weakness of the school is the administration and it's lack of insight. They drive away the good teachers by burning them out, leaving weak teachers to stay long term. There is little disciplinary action against troubled kids, so they terrorize the class unabated. The early preschool years are fine at Cowper campus, but instruction degrades rapidly from 1st grade on at Cohn campus. English instruction is especially weak, as is science. Math is fair. Mandarin instruction is fair. The parents who tend to like the school do not know Mandarin, so they are unaware of the level of instruction. There is very little exploratory learning, but plenty of rote. You will see that most native speakers leave the school since the Mandarin and English are not up to their standards. Ask to see how the students fair on the standardized tests (ERB and separate Mandarin test) You will find the administration will give excuse after excuse for the level of performance. There are other options for Mandarin instruction such as weekend school, tutoring, afterschool programs

- submitted by a parent
February 10, 2011
We absolutely adore this school. Our son is currently in his third year in the French program - so this review is specific to that program. I think it is important for prospective parents to understand that ISTP is basically a French school - it is French accredited, follows a French curriculum, and for the most part the teachers are French. Parents unfamiliar with the French educational system would therefore do well to learn about it, and how it differs from the American system, before enrolling. Our son's facility with the French language is astounding, and we love the diverse, down-to-earth, and decidedly "normal" parent community, refreshingly devoid of the Botox-and-BMW set that dominates other area private schools. Our son is something of a perfectionist, so the highly structured environment, with clearly-outlined goals and expectations, and the relative meritocracy of the French system (in which hard and careful work is rewarded) makes sense to him. We also love the high number of male teachers; our son has no shortage of role models at this school.

- submitted by a parent
January 10, 2010
My daughter was at ISTP for 4 years. My daughter made good friends there and we have made great friends with the wonderful families. ISTP is a worthwhile investment if your child has never been exposed to Mandarin Chinese and do not have support at home. By 1st grade, the Chinese/English exposure is 50/50 so it's about 3 active hours a day. There is little differentiation in the teaching of kids of various levels and the English program is not as strong as in the public schools (we are now in a public immersion program). Though we were not entirely happy with the math curriculum at ISTP, it is FAR better than the public school math curriculum. If you have the money ($18k) and do not have a public immersion program in your area, ISTP may be a good fit for you.

- submitted by a parent
January 05, 2010
This review submitted without content.


- submitted by a parent
November 16, 2009
This is the 3rd year our child is in the Mandarin immersion program at this school. He is thriving. His teachers have been absolutely stellar. He is already speaking Chinese (and we don't speak it at home) and understanding everything that is going on in the class. We have no doubt that he will be bilingual, even trilingual when he finishes his education here. He is currently in Kindergarten and comparing notes with public school parents in this area - I am so glad that I have my child in private school and especially glad that it's ISTP. They are teaching children in a very fun, low-pressure manner yet the kids are really figuring things out (English, reading) themselves and feeling very competent. I have no doubts about sending my child to this school.

- submitted by a parent
November 10, 2009
Excellent Chinese Immersion program - Both my children attend ISTP, and we love the school. The teachers are extremely nurturing, and there has been much thought invested in developing a curriculum designed to promote critical thinking through age-appropriate exercises. The academics are excellent in addition to supporting strong social/leadership skills and other soft skills. Additionally, my daughter, who started in Nursery and is now in K, has an impressive mastery of Mandarin despite the fact that we primarily speak English at home. The Chinese Immersion program was created in 1996, making it the longest established full-day Chinese Immersion program in Silicon Valley. They also have an excellent French Immersion program that is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. For our family, the ISTP experience has been culturally rich beyond expectation.

- submitted by a parent
September 18, 2009
Our daughter has been in this school in the French immersion track since nursery (she just started 4th grade). Her current teacher was suprised that we don't speak a word of French of at home--she is that fluent. In addition, she speaks Hindi (and reads and writes at the India 3rd grade level). The attitude towards multi-culturalism and multi-lingualism has been totally fostered by the school. I saw other second-gen Indian and Chinese children in public schools around who are embarrassed to speak their parent's languages! I totally disagree with the parent below about the lack of rigor. Most of the children at ISTP including my daughter consistently test in the top 10 percentile in ERB testing. I have two nephews in the same grade as my daughter in Encinal (a blue ribbon public school) in Menlo Park. She is clearly a year ahead in most areas.

- submitted by a parent
September 01, 2009
This school not only has excellent academics, but a wonderful and nurturing community. In order to reap the full benefits of the rigorous bilingual education, you should stay through middle school. Children are educated to be responsible, global citizens; they respect other cultures and are intellectually curious. We are thrilled with our children's experience at this chool.

- submitted by a parent
June 15, 2009
I was not happy with the education my children received at ISTP. My kids were at both campus and the administration at both campus was very uninviting. There was no differentiation at the kindergarten level. Kids who were reading at the first and second grade level, were taught basic phonics. At the first grade level, the differentiation in reading was which box you could select your reading book. The program is not rigerous. Although class sizes are small the Kindergarten class had a 1:15 ratio and the First 1:12 ratio, they weren't able to build any differentiation into the curriculm.

- submitted by a parent
February 18, 2009
If your child/family fall into their expectations, your child and you will find great satisfaction at ISTP. However, if your child falls outside of the 'norm' (high/low achieving), the school is not equipped with the teachers/specialists to tailor to your child's exceptional needs. Being the hot educational issue, differentiation is talked a lot at school but is not often practiced in the classroom (the extent of differentiation means different work sheets or different reading bins). As a parent familiar with progressive educational pedagogies, I find the school's teaching pedagogy to be very traditional. I am also a bit disappointed at the lack of rigor across the subjects - Chinese, English, and Math. The expectation levels set for the children seem to be even lower than that of the local public schools. The diversity of the student body and the cohesiveness of the families are wonderful, very positive aspects of ISTP.

- submitted by a parent
February 05, 2009
This school is brilliant! Our children are both now bilingual, despite coming from a monolingual home. During the summer in France I was asked why my children spoke such good English! The man was astonished to learn they were not French. But what's more, they are happy, well-rounded, superbly educated citizens of the world who do not expect special treatment because they have learned to stand confidently on their own two feet. I am somewhat surprised, and saddened, by the negative reviews. It may come down to expectations: not every child - or indeed every family - is cut out for friendly rigor of ISTP, where education is left strictly to the professionals (a practice I wholeheartedly endorse), but where there are myriad opportunities to enjoy the vibrant, multicultural, multinational parent community outside of the classroom. What better preparation for tomorrow's world could your children have?

- submitted by a parent
January 25, 2009
This review submitted without content.


- submitted by a parent
January 14, 2009
I am a parent of 3 children in the French Program (PreK, 2nd grade, 4th grade) at ISTP and we have been a part of the school community for 6 years. My husband and I are very pleased with our childrens' education thus far. First of all, and most importantly, the older two are fluent in French, which is wonderful because we do not speak it at home. Also, we really value the multicultural community of families, teachers and support staff and the richness it brings to the education and social life at school. As an example, I love the fact that my youngest daughter has 3 nurturing teachers who are from 3 different french-speaking countries. They bring such wonderful diversity to the classroom. There are many, many opportunities to get involved at ISTP as a parent, if you wish. We feel lucky that ISTP is a part of our lives!

- submitted by a parent
January 09, 2009
I'm a parent of a child in the Chinese program and thoroughly love the program and school. I've found my daughter's teachers to be engaging and they know the students and their personalities and learning styles. It saddens me to see the other reviews about the teachers. Perhaps they had a bad teacher, but all the teachers I've had have been great. I value the international perspective my daughter is gaining and I strongly believe she couldn't get such an education any where else. Compared to other Chinese schools in the area, I believe ISTP has the most balanced approach to a bilingual immersion education, one that takes into account both an education in Chinese and English. Not too mention she is being exposed to so many other cultures, not just Chinese. There is no other school like ISTP and for that I'm grateful that my daughter is a student there.

- submitted by a parent
January 03, 2009
This review submitted without content.


- submitted by a student
December 02, 2008
This is our 4th year at ISTP, in the Chinese program and I am seriously considering other options next year for my child. One parent put it succintly 'I want my child to be the deal-maker, not the translator.' Just having knowledge of a second-language doesn't make you a global leader... Giving children the ability to engage deeply in problem solving and opportunities to think outside the box is what gives children the global perspective. Unfortunately, this has not been our experiences at the school. With a hands-off attitude towards differentiation (non-existent despite what they tell you) discipline/social development (aside from a few one-day seminars, non-existent), the school is very traditional in its pedagogy. The curriculum supports the child that fits in their box. Curiousity and exploration are not encouraged. Though we will miss the 4 hours of Chinese instruction, a deep and well-rounded education is far more important.

- submitted by a parent
November 17, 2008
This is our first year at French program, and my daughter doesn't like it... I don't like it neither: it is extremely expensive and you just feel that teachers and stuff don't work hard enough for $25K+ a year (tuition + after-school child care + classes + camps during three breaks! and this is Pre-K!!!...) Teachers are definitely on a colder side... I asked to be present during a circle time to be able to learn all the songs and rhymes and then help my daughter with learning at home, but I was discouraged to do so and was told that the idea of an immersion program is for kids to step up and figure out by themselves... And even though my kid is quite sharp for 4-year old, the learning with this approach is painful.. Summary: too expensive, not inviting, not nurturing, even not educational, at least in Pre-K...

- submitted by a parent
October 10, 2008
We sent our children to the french program at ISTP and found the overall classroom atmosphere to be cold and uninviting. This is not a nurturing environment, the social emotional program is a joke. There is no differentiated learning whatsoever, it is a cookie-cutter approach to every child. This is a very old-fashioned approach to education. The parents are actively discouraged from remaining involved in their children's early education experience here. Communication from the teachers to the parents is almost non-existent (other than the 3 formal 15-minute P/T conferences each year). We found the education to be lacking in many areas, the only real plus here is the language itself. You have to be prepared to sacrifice a lot as well, like more advanced math and reading skills, and any social emotional learning. However, the school's big strong point is fund-raising, be prepared to be asked constantly to give more money.

- submitted by a parent
July 31, 2008
I have three children. Two have graduated from ISTP and the third one is currently enrolled. They were all enrolled in the French Program and I cannot make comments on the Chinese program. By the way, everyone was surprised at our children's good Parisian accent when My eldest child attended the school while it was still called the 'French School of the Peninsula'. The academic standard was very rigorous back then. it has softened over the years However, the academic strength, even though pretty good, is not really the ultimate focus of the school. The 'globalism' is the real value. The small school constantly has students from dozens of countries. Everyone learns about respecting different cultures, from east to west, north to south. The school truly teach their pupils to be global citizens. Where else in America can a kid eat a baguette sandwich next to one having home-made fried rice?

- submitted by a parent
June 05, 2008
This was our child's first year in the Mandarin Chinese/English program, and we are very disappointed with the school. Our child is not being challenged/stimulated in the English program. And the Chinese curriculum cannot complete with other nearby programs such as CASE and CLIP. At ISTP they don't do any differentiated instruction. The teachers stick to a set curriculum, so many of the children in the classroom are bored. The problems seem to come from the top -- the director is unaware of (or chooses to ignore) what's going on in the classrooms and general feeling of discontent among many of the parents.

- submitted by a parent
February 15, 2008
There are actually two schools within ISTP. One is the upper school which comprises K-8 (Cohn Campus) and the lower school which comprises Nursery-K. Our children have attended both campuses and we are far more satisfied with the Cohn campus - more resources, smaller classroom size (fewer children in a class), better curriculum, more qualified and inspired teachers, more differentiated teaching, more specific feedback on child progress. The early childhood education at Cowper could be far better considering the many wonderful options in the Palo Alto area. Not much creativity, too much circle time, not enough emphasis on social development (often a blind eye during recess), very little parent participation within the classroom (parent participation in the classroom is not encouraged). The biggest problem we have experienced at Cowper is the classroom size - often 21-22 students in a class with 2 teachers, so our children did not have regular opportunities to participate.

- submitted by a parent
January 29, 2008
We love ISTP! This is our daughter's 2nd year in the Mandarin program. She loves learning and speaking Mandarin, the many school events that includes parents, kids and staff; and the fun afterschool Chinese dance class. She comes home singing in Mandarin. She loves cooking in French class. She had and has dedicated, wonderful, loving, nurturing teachers who have helped her with her social-emotional learning. All of the teachers treat the kids as individuals and really care about them. The head of school and his staff have been most helpful and they do listen to the parents' concerns. My husband and I expressed our concern that the school buses for school trips didn't have seat belts -- by the next school trip all school buses were equipped with seat belts. We love the parent community, and all the languages that are spoken at the school.

- submitted by a parent
January 25, 2008
If you're desire is to maximize your children's chances for success in the future and you want them challenged academically, this is your school. They will be citizens of the world, not just citizens of California, and will be incredibly well prepared for the chaos of modern life. They will be confident in their own abilities and comfortable anywhere in the world. The French curriculum is rigorous, and, at times, seems to take no prisoners, but it is worth every penny. While the parents are very involved with the school, they are, thankfully, not allowed in the classrooms. This school believes in leaving the classroom to the professionals. I couldn't agree more. My children have been totally happy at this school from kindergarten all the way to 8th grade. I never second-guessed myself on the decision to go to ISTP. You won't either.

- submitted by a parent
January 16, 2008
If you are French, francophone or francophile you could do not better. Children study both the French national and the California curricula. Staff are focused and dedicated. It is a phenomenal system that cranks out bilingual, disciplined students by the end of 8th grade.

- submitted by a parent
January 15, 2008
We have two kids at ISTP and are very happy. Having read the reviews of those who are not happy, I can only assume that they were not 100% into having their child be bilingual. You do have to be very supportive for your child(ren) to succeed in a bilingual school--supportive of both the child(ren) and the teacher(s). When I hear my kids switch with ease between two languages (French and English), one of which is never spoken at home, I am truly amazed. It's a great feeling for both parent and child when they can translate for you on your trip to France! Regarding after school care--they have many great options in classes after school, the parents complaining just chose not to pay for these options! If you do the basic day care, you get what you are paying for, someone to watch your child while they play!

- submitted by a parent
November 08, 2007
We have two children at the school, and we couldn't be happier in the peninsula! This school offers not only a bi-lingual, high-level academic curriculum, but also an environment of understanding and tolerance in a multi-cultural community. We love the fact that subjects that are discounted in public, as well as many private schools, such as music and art, are an important part of the student's lives. The school works hard to communicate and involve all the families in the many activities they have throughout the year.

- submitted by a parent
July 31, 2007
This review submitted without content.


- submitted by a parent
July 27, 2007
I will not send my child back to this school. Aftercare is not even at a minimally acceptable level of safety or supervision from my perspective. Teachers and administrators just don't appear to be interested in new family input.

- submitted by a parent
June 21, 2007
This is the only real option down in the Peninsula, and the lack of competition shows in the way the administration runs the school and 'works' with the parents. Paying $16,000 a year, we expected to have a quality all-around education for our child, however, in reality, it was an uninspired year (e.g., little creativity, no differentiated teaching, little individualized attention). It's too bad, because it would be great to see bilingualism offered at all schools - one would think this school would want to be a model school.

- submitted by a parent
June 13, 2007
If bilingualism is your first priority, then International School of the Peninsula could be the right fit. If you are interested in high-caliber academics (e.g., Challenger, Palo Alto public schools) or the Whole Child (e.g. Keys, Ohlone), then this is not the place for you. Administration communications/feedback with parents could be improved.

- submitted by a parent
January 14, 2006
This is an excellent school for families interested in multi-lingual and multi-cultural exposure. In elementary school, the kids learn either French or Madarin through immersion. They quickly become fluent. What's more is the cultural exposure. Parents are international in spirit and often background. This rubs into the culture of the school and on the children. There is also an extraordinary art teacher. The school is at times disorganized. If you seek a great deal of structure, this may be a problem for you. Overall, it is an exceptional school focused on teaching kids to become global citizens.

- submitted by a parent
November 07, 2005
This review submitted without content.


- submitted by a parent
October 28, 2005
This review submitted without content.


- submitted by a parent
October 15, 2005
Both my kids attended istp, and we love it. Main positive points: * immersion school. Classes are taught in french or madarin chinese. The kids quickly become fluent regardless of language spoken at home. * Strong sense of international culture. Families are from all over the world. This creates an incredible inter-cultural exchange which rubs on the kids but also on the parents. * Strong community and strong arts program too. * Small classes, attention to each individual kid. * Good teacher/admin communications w/ parents. On the down side, we have had a couple of years where academics were weaker than expected, when we felt the kids were not pushed to do their best. But these two years were the exception. Overall, the teachers are dedicated and the entire school very cohesive and engaged with the families. This is a great school!

- submitted by a parent
March 25, 2005
The Chinese program is at its beginning stages. The language curriculum is good, but other areas such as science, math, music and art are loosely tied together. The administration is unorganized. It was a disappointment for us.

- submitted by a parent
March 02, 2005
Concerning ISTP, the school, in spite of the title 'International' is a French/American school. While there is a Chinese/American track, for the entire 9 years of its existence, it has not come up to meet the quality of the French track. Any parent who desires a first rate education for a child should choose the French track. If a parent is interested in a Chinese immersion program, look to other schools.

- submitted by a parent
Need help choosing a school? We can help »

Media Gallery

Media missing

Uh oh! No photos. This frame will look much better when you upload photos »


Facebook


Nearby homes for sale

     

Last modified: October 28, 2014

Sign up for email updates

Connect with us

Translate this web page

About GreatSchools

Our mission is to help millions of parents get a great education for their kids. GreatSchools.org is an independent nonprofit and the leading national source of school information for families.


GreatSchools.org 1999 Harrison Street, Suite 1100, Oakland, CA 94612

©1998-2014 GreatSchools.org All Rights Reserved. GreatSchools is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization | Ad Choices

International School Of The Peninsula
151 Laura Lane, Palo Alto, CA  94303
(650) 251-8500
Last modified International School Of The Peninsula is a Private school that serves grades K-8
International School Of The Peninsula Rating: 3 out of 5 based on 55 reviews. Top