Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

R. Roger Rowe Elementary School

Public | K-5

 
 

Living in Rancho Santa Fe

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $1,800,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,380.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

16 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted February 23, 2014

I am a former parent and I am surprised yet encouraged to see the discussion in the previous posts about the Foundation. I believe my child would have had a far better education had there been no parent funding. It sounds like a great idea but the money ends up compensating for poor teaching, bad curriculums and weak administration. They have more money than most schools in ca without the foundation help but just can't seem to deliver. We are much happier in private school. As for the previous post, the things listed are provided at most public elementary schools in North County and if those parents are even required to contribute financially it is a much, much smaller amount. I think every Rowe parent needs to ask themselves why they give this amount of money to the school. What are they expecting in return? Obviously parents feel they get something - why else would you give over $10,000 a year - but it is not for what the Foundation advertises as these things can be provided with little if any additional money.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 7, 2014

I AM IMPRESSED. The staff and teachers are amazing. I had my child in a private school $15/yr. To switch our child to this school - It was decided with much research & examination. The academic program, reading- writing program is impressive. The enrichment classes & lunch clubs offered are fabulous. The children are taught to be responsible for their actions & their work at a young age. Children are very prepared academically for the future - the results (via scores & where children go on for HS & College) speak for themselves. The school goes above to enrich: Nasa engineer speaker (last month) etc. Partner with the Scripps & Birch programs - being taught by marine scientist. Academic competitions, DRAMA, ART, PE, MUSIC.. even the lunch program is modern-forward thinking - a recycle bar for kids and the garden! The school works hard to promote KINDNESS thru various programs other schools do not. What impresses me the most is to hear or see kids that see another not so nice act, and the KIDS step UP and say - hey thats mean - thats not OK. That and those kids will make the difference and I want my son to learn in that environment. There are bullies everywhere in life.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 17, 2013

There are some great things about the school but they certainly waste our money. If you don't donate to the foundation at least fair share you are ostracized and your children may suffer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 15, 2013

The school is good, but I question why the foundation asks parents every year for their "Fair Share" of $1,709 per student , when this Basic Aid district receives annually over $7.6 million dollars of taxes levied for General Purposes and another $2.1 million dollars levied for Debt Service (school bonds) for approx. 662 students. The good news is, State funding is expected to increase over the next 4 years. So will parents "Fair Share" be less? I'm not a big fan of publishing the names and amounts every parent gives either. It just makes the parents who can't give feel bad and the one's who do give feel superior.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 9, 2013

Academics are first rate. Very responsive teachers and administration. There is a bullying problem on all levels that hopefully the school will address. A major problem is that there is a full handbook of specific rules for the school that just isn't enforced in any manner whatsoever. Teaching the kids it is ok to ignore the rules. To be fair, many of the parents act in the same manner. Many of the children are a bit unruly, unchecked by parents that don't care or have no idea what is going on. You wouldn't know if by meeting most of the kids, they are well schooled in putting on the respectful face for elders, only to turn around and be quite different in reality. A school full of Eddie Haskels. Of course this does not apply all the kids, but there is enough that it rubs off on many off on many.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2013

Bullying going on...nothing is being done. Kids are scared, parents are in denial, and there is no policy regarding zero tolerance that is being practiced. Disgraceful!


Posted April 23, 2012

We had an incredible experience at this school and are very familiar with staff and administrative personnel. My shy, incredibly bright and backwards socially son blossomed here. His talents were recognized and rewarded, his intellect stimulated with Mr. Warmer's awesome physics, the math program was superb, we were given advanced placement, the writing program helped him to learn to expand his writing and gain immeasurable skill in composition, the fun educational activities like the greek olympiad, egypt studies, American Indian studies, Colonial days, etc. made learning fun. On the other side, I love that the school has a real coach and full gym for sports and athletic activities. I saw my son make friends, establish good relationships with peers and teacher alike to become a well-adjusted, secure individual. This school offers what other schools can not. It has programs which enrich and teach, fantastic facilities, and a great administration that cares about the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 29, 2011

We have 4 children and all have attended/graduate from this school. This is an amazing school and I was shocked not to see 5 stars by its name. Then I noticed there are 2 reviews from 2006/7 that are totally NOT reflective of the school as it exists today. Longtime Admin/Teachers and fresh new faculty make it a point to get to know every student/family. Many faculty members are also school parents. Differentiated learning is offered at both the advanced and remedial levels. Education Foundation, led by parent volunteers supplements the District budget with close to $1mm each year-this school is unlike any other public school in the county and rivals or beats other private school options.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2010

With our four children, we have been in several private and public schools in different states. Hands down, R. Roger Rowe is the best at having high expectations for everyone and pushing everyone towards excellence. They also believe, in the best of ways, that education is a partnership between the school admin, the teachers, the parents, and the child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2010

Love this school! Kids leave here with a great attitude and really prepared for high school. Students from this school have great study skills, advanced curriculum which rivals high school science and english. While they have to work hard here, this training makes them high achievers and good students. Kids have great friends and are very confident, able to converse with ease with teachers, peers and other adults. The superintendent is connected to the students and highly involved in the school. There are some really great teachers who inspire students to learn and now with a new school being built and a state of the art performing art center it will be incredible. All this in a K-8.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2008

This school is moving in a very positive direction with lots of thought toward preparing children to learn in an ever changing world. We are fortunate to have a school that is looking to teach children to think critically and to love to learn. Getting beyond the judging of a school by test scores alone is a huge step and one to be applauded.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 29, 2008

Wonderful School! Small classes, lots of parent involvement, high performing students who are nice, good families, great teaching staff who are stuck with the old ways, innovative staff/curriculum/administration, a great place to see kid's grow up in a safe environment. District is small so everyone knows eachother and is involved in school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2008

Great School! Lots of parental involvement, community awareness program, character development, community programs on top of innovative academics. Students have lots of opportunites to learn, excel and grow with small class sizes and enrichment, literacy, Columbia Univ. writing, advanced math, music, art, language, science, drama, robotics, rocketry, sports, band, chorus, imovies, computer graphic design, etc. Small class sizes, incredible parent-adminstration partnering, community and strong parent involvement make for nice kids and a nice school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2008

Rowe School is wonderful. My kids love this school. They have lots of friends and lots of activities, as well as, a great academics program. We have found many great friendships as well and are happy that we can be part of a school with small class sizes, such wonderful parent involvement, and an inclusive community program--a 'caring community' focus. Both the teachers and the administration listen to parent concerns and because there are only 750 students total at both campuses, the staff know my children by name.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 1, 2007

I was not impressed with this school. I moved to Rancho Santa Fe, and removed my child within his first quarter. The school is overcrowded for one. And he came home on hid third day enrolled at Rowe asking me if we were 'good because we have money.' School totally does not know what 'good people' are.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2006

Totally bizarre school, will teach socieconomic values of elitism, but not much else. Much more focused on land acquisition now than on education. Encumbered by poor teachers with tenure and awful board.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

957

Change from
2012 to 2013

-6

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

957

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-6

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
84%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
92%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
87%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students96%
Females96%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only98%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students97%
Females96%
Males97%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged97%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only98%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate96%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students87%
Females94%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students93%
Females97%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability97%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students93%
Females98%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students99%
Females98%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged99%
Students with disability100%
Students with no reported disability98%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only99%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate96%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students94%
Females100%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate97%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students95%
Females96%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino85%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students91%
Females87%
Males95%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino92%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 82% 26%
Hispanic 9% 52%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 11%
Two or more races 2% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Black 1% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 3%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

5927 La Granada
Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067
Website: Click here
Phone: (858) 756-1141

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools

Horizon Prep
Rancho Santa Fe, CA


Nativity School, The
Rancho Santa Fe, CA



The Rhoades School
Encinitas, CA




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT