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GreatSchools Rating

Alice Birney Waldorf-Inspired

Public | K-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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53 reviews of this school


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Posted June 5, 2014

This school is fantastic in every way and I've loved sending both my of children through the entire K-8 run here. I particularly enjoy the work of Robert Berry, hosting the fundraising events and Strings concerts. His handsome and approachable demeanor make him a desirable yet admirable addition to the already great looking stable of Alice Birney dads.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2013

I dislike this school for the same reasons I like this school! I have had four children in Alice Birney --worked great for two and not so great for the other two. My main concern is that the children stay with the same teacher from first through eighth grade--good news if you get a decent teacher, not so great if you don't. Some teachers are more academically driven and able, others don't seem to know much about what they are teaching. Also, classes are required to sit together at lunch so there is little cross interaction within the classes....there is too much identification with whose class you are in. And asking the average elementary teacher to teach the tougher subjects, such as middle school math, is usually an abysmal failure. Both my older children left by middle school to attend traditional middle schools as they wanted real math instruction. Good enough school for lower grades, but I recommend keeping a close eye on how your child is faring (ie learning) at the middle school level. I have child left to start school in a couple of years and am not sure I will go this route again....I'm keeping a watchful eye on the development of the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2012

I have been at this school for twelve years now. My oldest is now in high school and doing A+ work. She thrived with the mostly Waldorf curriculum which emphasized hands on, age appropriate learning. Waldorf, in its truest sense, does involve some spiritual aspects; however, in a Waldorf 'inspired' public school this seems to translate into a reverence for nature, art and health. My son, while not a straight A student, began testing above or at grade level by 6th grade. Although, what I really care about is that, at age 13, he still has a passion for learning. I do believe mild learning disabilities often go undiagnosed. However, because it is a public school, there are protocols in place to investigate suspected problems once they are brought to the principals attention. We finally realized in 8th grade that my daughter was mildly dyslexic, but we had already worked out coping strategies that she still uses today. Currently the school community is working to resolve some 'growing' pains and find a happy middle ground between its Waldorf and Public School images. Alice Birney is a wonderful school where both parents and kids can get involved and make a difference.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2012

I have had 3 girls in this program from 2003 to 2012. The teachers are generally very nice with a few exceptions. I pulled my 3rd grader out of school in January because of what the Waldorf method teaching philosophy is and is not. The Waldorf method was developed by Rudolf Steiner who believed in an anthroposophical view of child development which forms the philosophical basis for the educational theory, methodology of teaching and curriculum. Anthroposophy includes the belief that humans possess an innate spirit which, having passed through previous lives, in the current life works to fulfill a chosen purpose in a karmically determined environment. Steiner bases his whole educational approach to teaching children on karma or magic and NOT proven science. It is shocking that a public school is allowed to have an educational approach such as this. Parents are very much unaware that karma or magic and NOT proven science is the philosophical basis for teaching their children at Alice Birney. Many teachers here place very little value on the Star Testing. Teachers avoid talking about the real basis on which the school is based. Do your own research before enrolling.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2012

Alice Birney illegally disqualifies students with special needs from their program to keep their test scores up and themselves looking good. They don't care about children, they care about their pocket books and their scores. Shame on you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2010

In our experience, children with learning disabilities may not thrive at this school. There are many nice things about the school but the teachers in general resist the idea that a child may be struggling due to LD's. Some even reject the idea that there ARE LD's. We were told that our 4th grader couldn't read because she had watched an occasional TV show as a young child - not because of her severe auditory processing disorder. After 2 years of intensive speech therapy our daughter is thriving at a traditional middle school - making A's in language arts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2009

It is a warm and welcoming community of caring adults and children. My children have received wonderful educations at John Morse. Most importantly they learn to respect others, themselves, the learning process and the world around them
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 5, 2009

Ilove the beauty of the gardens,trees, and classrooms.The staff is gentle, loving, and dedicated, full of song music, art, verse and poem, movement and learning in a joyful way. Gardening, cooking, handwork, woodwork, clay and service in the school and community are also part of this learning community. And many, many parents are volunteering in every aspect of the school. There is a diversity of students and families. There are many celebrations like the harvest festival, the winter festival, concerts, plays. Classes take many field trips to enhance their curriculum. We have spanish teachers first thru eight. Well, I could go on. We are an exceptional school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 5, 2009

I think one of the most valuable lessons our students learn is compassion for each other. Instead of isolating the grades from each other, there is interaction between the higher grades and kindergarten and 1st graders, from working in the classroom to our graduating students welcoming the new incoming 1st graders. All the things parents wish were still in elementary education - art, music, movement are present in our school along with caring and respectful teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 5, 2009

In this era of standardized tests, dumbed-down curricula, and rote 'drill-and-kill' learning, John Morse is a breath of fresh air. I felt myself relax and breathe when I first visited, and it's stayed that way for me for the past 11 years!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2009

John Morse is a wonderful school with so much to offer the students. We can't think of another single school that matches up to what our daughter is experiencing at this unique public Waldorf school. All public schools have much to learn from what happens here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2009

John Morse allows kids to be the kids they can truly be, while giving them all of the tools to succeed in any scholastic environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2009

John Morse teaches kids to be critical thinkers, to solve problems in a creative way. Their teachers are wonderful, every single one of them. The school community is like extended family. There is lots of support and kindness that flows over into our children's education. I couldn't think of a better place for my kids to be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2009

We wouldn't put our son in any other school. We get the best of both worlds: public and Waldorf. The school helps kids to balance their right and left sides of their brains, using creative arts to enhance the teaching of academics. The parents choose this school and some drive very far to get there, so everyone is enthusiastic and supportive of the community. The teachers are quite talented in their own right and devoted to helping each kid reach their highest potential. We have cultural diversity and celebrate that with a Multicultural Festival each spring. The teachers and the school philosophy look at how a chld develops, physically, emotionally, mentally and bases the teaching curriculum and style on that, so that a child's success is maximized. Children leaving this environment succeed very well in any future school they decide on.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2009

Amazing teachers, wholistic approach education, respect for the child, support of each child's uniqueness, developmentally appropriate, wonderful involved parents. A true community coming together to nurture and educate our children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2009

The amazing dedication of our faculty and staff, the strong sense os community, the way graduates return to visit and volunteer, the growth that is observable in our students and hearing students who have come from other schools express their surprise that now, they love school...Childhood is honored, the development of the child is nurtured and supported by all with respect for who they are as an individual.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2009

It is a Waldorf methods public school - important to us who formerly had our son in a private Waldorf school and liked it a lot.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2009

My son is excited everyday he comes home from school. On Sunday he asked 'Is tomorrow a school day?' When I told him that it was he began to dance around and said 'yay! I want to go back to school' What more can you ask for as a parent?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2009

The first time I visited the Kindergarten at John Morse I wanted to stay and start my own education all over again. The entire school is infused with thoughtful attention to all of the needs of the students, staff, and families. There are ample opportunities for family involvement that lead to an ownership of the school experience for both the parents and the children. My son loves to talk about his school and the garden that we helped to plant. I love to talk about the teachers and staff and I am thrilled with the gentleness and joy with which they have helped my son to transition into his first school experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2009

An approach to teaching that incorporates everything a child needs in order to experience education in wonderfully diverse ways.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

756

Change from
2012 to 2013

0

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

2 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

756

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

0

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

2 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
7%

2012

 
 
18%

2011

 
 
18%

2010

 
 
20%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
27%

2010

 
 
25%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
20%

2010

 
 
45%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
28%

2011

 
 
17%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
53%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
26%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
72%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
56%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
35%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
61%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
46%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
28%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
71%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
75%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
53%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
45%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students7%
Females8%
Males7%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)7%
Economically disadvantaged6%
Not economically disadvantaged8%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability7%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only8%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate0%
Parent education - declined to state10%

Math

All Students22%
Females12%
Males30%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)26%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged22%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability22%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only21%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate16%
Parent education - declined to state29%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students23%
Females31%
Males10%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)32%
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability23%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only25%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state29%

Math

All Students31%
Females31%
Males32%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)45%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability31%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state36%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students63%
Females67%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state63%

Math

All Students28%
Females26%
Males32%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino25%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)32%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability33%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only28%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state32%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students69%
Females65%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate73%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state76%

Math

All Students69%
Females57%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate91%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)46%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state68%

Science

All Students47%
Females40%
Males53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged51%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability49%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only48%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate64%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)31%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state38%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students71%
Females75%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged80%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability73%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate45%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate73%
Parent education - declined to state68%

Math

All Students54%
Females57%
Males52%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate42%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate45%
Parent education - declined to state60%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students80%
Females80%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)72%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only79%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students69%
Females73%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students57%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability57%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students97%
Females100%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantaged93%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability97%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students56%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students72%
Females73%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students70%
Females60%
Males80%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability72%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 60%
Hispanic 19%
Black 8%
Two or more races 6%
Asian 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 40%N/AN/A
English language learners 5%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 6%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mechelle Horning
Fax number
  • (916) 433-5589

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Waldorf

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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6251 13th Street
Sacramento, CA 95831
Phone: (916) 433-5544

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