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High Tech High

Charter | 9-12 | 570 students

 

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Living in San Diego

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $615,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,490.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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23 reviews of this school


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Posted June 21, 2014

The humanities classes are excellent. Biology is excellent. Support in getting kids into college is excellent. Art integration is good. The project-based learning and constructivist educational methods support good critical thinking and healthy collaboration skills. Use of primary sources (versus lousy district textbooks) is wonderful. The math instruction is poor. My daughter had a 4.0 and was accepted to top tier universities, but did not develop solid math skills in any of her math classes at HTHI. Language instruction is also poor. Worst of all is the draconian and uninformed drug policy. Like most schools, there is a drug problem at HTHI, as well as HTH. The administration thinks that zero tolerance expulsion and "just say no" is going to address the problem. Best-practice alternatives grounded in sound behavioral and educational theory and research have been presented to them, but they have thus far chosen to disregard. The result is ongoing drug use AND alienation of the few kids who they happen to catch, and none of the kids end up getting the support and guidance that a conscientious school community could provide.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2014

Warning! If you are a Conservative and/or Christian, you WILL get highly offend when going to this school. Usually bias is out of education, not at High Tech High. Liberal Agendas run from, income equality (they want it equal) in Math, if God exists (they say not) in Physics, and in Humanities, how horrible the church was in the time of discovering America, not to mention, in my case my teacher made an offensive joke about the church. If you don't want propaganda infused in your education STAY AWAY from High Tech High.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 20, 2013

high tech high is probably one of the worst school i ve ever expirienced in my life, the school is set up to seem abstract and progressive to visitors but the classes and content are very seirously lacking. the way that teachers and staff treat students is subjective, if they like you then the teachers are good but if they dont, they make it their personal mission to make your high school expireince a living hell. stay FAR away from high tech high
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 21, 2013

This school has been incredible for my son. The teachers go beyond mere academics and get to know their students as people. The students all have an advisor for 4 years and develop a strong bond. If I had to name one weak area it would be math but having had other children attend different schools Math seems to be a problem everywhere. My son is not afraid to speak to his teachers, knows when to ask for help, is able to work with people of all sorts of backgrounds and is curious and interested in the world around him. The college advisor is beyond great and all the kids are helped to get into a college that is the right fit for them. In an earlier review it was stated that sometimes the students have to take remedial classes when they get to college, again I have experienced that with my kids that attended other schools as well. That is a common problem that all the colleges talk about when discussing their incoming students. The fact is my son is happy to go to school, has met amazing students and teachers. I absolutely love this school and the way they teach. The teachers at HTH are excited to teach and their students go deep instead of just checking of state standards.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2013

This school is not for everyone. Many of the negative reviews on this site are comming from parents who chose the wrong kind of school for their kid. High Tech High puts the learning into the hands of the student- it's a collaberation between the students and the teachers. Your student will get as much out of the education that he or she puts in. I have attended this school throughout High School and it's flexible curriculum and focus on following your own interests has allowed me to focus on research at UCSD, intern at a web develepment firm, and intern with Quallcomm Labs.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 28, 2012

The HTH system is compiled of teachers who teach nothing and assign enormous amounts of completely meaningless work despite promises of a low homework load at orientations. You will most likely find yourself learning next to nothing in a sub-standard curriculum and having to take basic courses in college to make up for it. The "less structured approach" somehow also includes no choice in classes and a rigid dress code. I urge you not to even attempt sending your child to this school because if they do switch out after you find these shortcomings they will find themselves hopelessly behind the level they should be at due to the lack of history, science, language and possibly math received from HTH.


Posted May 27, 2012

Our first student has now graduated from HTHI and is experiencing success at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. With acceptance letters from both public and private colleges across the country, she ultimately decided to stay close to home in CA. That said, she is a very astute, self-motivated and competitive student. She was able to navigate the many challenges (organizationally and socially) at HTHI with grace and an eye toward college. HTH schools perform a refreshing approach to school. Teachers are relatable to students and create challenging projects in every subject. HTH teachers are able to help students discover their personal interests in part due to smaller class sizes. These schools are not for every student however. If your student needs a regimented, impersonal, traditional school to graduate, than this is not the place for your student. Students here are learning not only about language arts, math, and science, they are also learning that money, looks, and social status are not always prerequisites for success. Anyone can achieve academic success at HTH Village schools if they are willing to apply themselves.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2012

Our son graduated from HTHCV 2011 and was accepted on full academic scholarship to a very expensive private school back east - 100% of his friends were accepted into college and are attending college to some degree to this day. This school is NOT for every child. Forget the hype and focus on your own child and find a specific school that fits your child's needs. Our son was self-motivated, self-disciplined, and flourished at HTHCV because he didn't require 24/7 supervision to do his work. He was allowed to speak and be heard and very much needed the small class size to succeed. He loved the projects he worked on. He loved his teachers. He'd stay at school 10 hours a day if we let him. At the same time, we saw many students around him fail and leave HTHCV over the 4 years - why? They couldn't keep up with the course work and the requirements, they blamed the teachers and their parents blamed the teachers - none of these kids accepted responsibility for their own failures and none that I'm aware of ended up going to college. HTHCV has its flaws but for the right student it is truly the best program out there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 12, 2011

I m a parent of an 8th grader who attends HTMCV. This is a beautiful new building sitting in the outskirts of Chula overlooking big open spaces of the Otay Valley. All young, beautiful and enthusiastic teachers, safe environment for the kids but that s where the positive ends. I ended up pulling my 5th grader out of the HT elementary. He was having a hard time adjusting to the no text books, no homework and no real math mentality. He hated the school & didn t understand why at their age they had to sit around the carpet and have the teacher read & act out third grade reading level books to them. Not much really changes with the upper grades. HT Staff does not discuss school's academic performance; my questions to them have gone unanswered. Town hall meetings are about the beautiful school & how lucky we are to have our kids there rather than showing the accountability reports. Most parents do not question the school because they get caught up in the hype. The ones who are finding out the many faults of the HT schools system are the ones paying attention, questioning their kids and doing quite a bit of research. I ll be pulling out my 8th grader next year as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2011

Do you hate your kid? If you answered YES to this question then you should send your kid straight to High Tech High! Why? Well if you really wanna send your kid a message about how much you hate them dump em at HTH. HTH employs a never-before-seen smoke and mirrors tactic that everyone will love! Parents think their kid is learning and preparing for college while the student believes that he or she is actually learning, it's quite genius! But wait there's more! If your kid can stand 4 years at HTH they'll be ready for one of the biggest letdowns of their lives, the realization that HTH has screwed them on all learning and most importantly, study skills! They will be stuck at JC's for years, not re-learning, but LEARNING the material from square one. Years behind and frustrated, you will finally be able to have the last laugh!! On a more serious note, as a former student of HTH I loved it until I hit college and the real world. I spent years in the JC system and had to completely learn how to study thanks to HTH's textbookless learning regime. In closing, I hope you can detect the satire in the above story, it's the only way I know how to spin my experience in a happy way.


Posted July 30, 2010

In its favor, High Tech High provides a safe and clean environment. However, it is also an environment singularly lacking in imagination, which turns the possibilities of discovery in education into drudgery. The faculty piles on assignments without apparent regard for the long term or for the students' grasp of the material. If your child needs extra help, you can get it to the letter of the law if you press the administration, but don't expect generosity. There is no spirit of community among the parents. The sole function of the parent organization is to raise money. I went through an entire year without learning any parents' names, despite numerous attempts on my part to involve myself in the community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2010

I'm disturbed by so many of the reviews found in this forum, as they are misguided and, frankly, wrong. Someone entered erroneous stats about community college rates (and CC is great for some kids, by the way). Also, HTH has always been clear that this school is not for everyone. If you want your child lectured at and filled with facts that s/he puts on a test and then forgets, by all means send them to your local school. Thanks to HTH's energetic and passionate teachers and leadership!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2009

High Tech High has been one of the best places for me to grow and be inspired. I have been a student as well as a tutor here and for the past 8 years I have always been greeted with kindness and people with a strong dedication for education.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 29, 2009

I have worked at HTH for 10 years, and most of the complaints are correct. However, we have gotten more organized, but we don t have a draconian set of rules. We use some textbooks, but more primary and secondary sources. In college the most important skill you need is to interact with your professors, and our students are great at that. Everyone has a hard time with the college paper chase, but if you can communicate openly with your professors it is golden. We only have Spanish and we don t have football. When a college sees the students took 4years of math, science, English and met the A-G requirements, (you can t graduate with out meeting them) they real like our students. I would take any advise about a school with a grain of salt, even mine. We actually teach the students this too, know the source.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 12, 2008

I believe this school did an excellent job of preparing my daughter for the UC system where she starts in a few days. Many parents have noted issues below with the emphasis on presentations over tests and other day to day organizational issues all of which can present a few problems. However there is no comparason with the other public school in Pt Loma, (with regards to academics) which my son attends. The test scores at PLHS are much lower, the classes are alot bigger, crime is a big problem. In all fairness though the gap does appear to be closing some based on the latest API scores and PLHS has a great sports program
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 3, 2008

I agree to disagree with the previous review. ALL DO NOT end up in fine colleges; unless you are not considering the 33% attending junior college. 57% accepted to public colleges and of that 57% only 14% accepted to the uc system and less than 10% accepted to private universities. The kids do learn excellent presentation skills; however I wonder how these kids transition to college with NO text book experience. If you check the Star Testing website, a parent will have a clear idea if their kids overall are learning math and science at HTH.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2008

Where else would my child have worked with researchers in Africa to do DNA testing on bushmeat to help catch poachers, co authored a field guide on the San Diego Bay, designed and built an apparatus to enable a young man with CP to eat by himself, designed a computer game, interned for a non profit and designed their Website? Where else do students of every race, economic level and geographic area come together to learn and get along and ALL end up accepted to fine colleges? These polished presenters and enthusiastic learners are very impressive to colleges. (my son's friends are all off to Berkely, UCLA and other top schools this fall ). Yes it can be disorganized. Yes, we did get some tutoring to fill in math gaps in 11th grade. But the preparation for life and learning is second to none.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 1, 2008

I am pulling my child out of this school because of the teacher and academic quality. Too many teachers w/no experience. Courses are blocked and integrated and my experience has been my child is taught very little in each subject. I am concerned my child will not be fully prepared for college because too much time is spent on projects and group work and little time is spent on learning a particular subject in-depth. The things I do like are that there is a great deal of writing done in the classes. They learn great computer skills which includes power point presentations often. It has a small good diverse student body and the kids seem to all get along. As much as I hate changing because my child enjoys the school very much, I feel it will be best for my child s academic success to move.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2008

There are great things about the school - class size, student engagement, higher-than-normal testing results for 9 & 10th graders. Problems exist however. In addition, the school is very unorganized. Examples - teachers who do not turn grades in many times over; school forgetting to put on their web calendar that students have a day off; school allowing students to publish one price for the yearbook and then telling parents that the price is actually much higher; right hand not knowing what the left hand is doing, etc. I'm mulling over taking my student out. There is some question whether classes meet A-G requirements as well -
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2007

Our child did not end up going from HTM to HTH for a number of reasons. First we were concerned about the lack of text book use, lectures and note taking... skills that are very important for college. Languages, music and sports are also not very far along at HT and these are areas that our child likes to participate in at a level not offered at HT. For example; if you go to High Tech High you can take Spanish, but only to a certain level. No French, no German, etc. If you go to High Tech International you are offered Spanish and Mandarin. Music is something that can be done during X Block, but there is no formal class. Sports are new for HT and while I applaud the fact that they now exist sports are still new to HT and need a few years to season.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

807

Change from
2012 to 2013

+13

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

807

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+13

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 25% in 2013.

158 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
43%
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 65% in 2013.

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Biology/Life Sciences

The state average for Biology/Life Sciences was 58% in 2013.

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Earth Science

The state average for Earth Science was 38% in 2013.

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English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 62% in 2013.

156 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
76%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 16% in 2013.

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Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 45% in 2013.

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Integrated/Coordinated Science I

The state average for Integrated/Coordinated Science I was 26% in 2013.

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Physics

The state average for Physics was 38% in 2013.

158 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%
World History

The state average for World History was 51% in 2013.

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Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 13% in 2013.

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Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 39% in 2013.

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Biology/Life Sciences

The state average for Biology/Life Sciences was 41% in 2013.

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Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 46% in 2013.

147 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
26%

2011

 
 
26%

2010

 
 
11%
Earth Science

The state average for Earth Science was 35% in 2013.

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English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 52% in 2013.

147 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
76%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 15% in 2013.

144 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
20%
High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11)

The state average for High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11) was 76% in 2013.

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Science

The state average for Science was 54% in 2013.

145 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
47%
World History

The state average for World History was 46% in 2013.

148 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 10% in 2013.

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Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 15% in 2013.

123 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
25%

2011

 
 
25%

2010

 
 
15%
Biology/Life Sciences

The state average for Biology/Life Sciences was 51% in 2013.

126 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
61%
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 32% in 2013.

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Earth Science

The state average for Earth Science was 37% in 2013.

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English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 48% in 2013.

123 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
66%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 8% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

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High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11)

The state average for High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11) was 49% in 2013.

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Physics

The state average for Physics was 58% in 2013.

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U.S. History

The state average for U.S. History was 50% in 2013.

126 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
55%
World History

The state average for World History was 19% in 2013.

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Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students48%
Females51%
Males46%
African American15%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino42%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)57%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Non-economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disability35%
Students with no reported disability52%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate51%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate50%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate50%
Parent education - declined to state54%

Algebra II

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Biology/Life Sciences

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Earth Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students82%
Females88%
Males75%
African American69%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino76%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disability77%
Students with no reported disability82%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate77%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate78%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to state83%

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Integrated/Coordinated Science I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Physics

All Students31%
Females29%
Males34%
African American8%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino19%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)45%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Non-economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disability30%
Students with no reported disability32%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate28%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate31%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate43%
Parent education - declined to state32%

World History

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Algebra II

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Biology/Life Sciences

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Chemistry

All Students25%
Females21%
Males28%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino19%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)31%
Economically disadvantaged18%
Non-economically disadvantaged32%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability25%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only25%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate23%
Parent education - high school graduate22%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)23%
Parent education - college graduate20%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate39%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Earth Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students74%
Females74%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino69%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate71%
Parent education - high school graduate65%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)54%
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Students34%
Females27%
Males38%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino25%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)46%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Non-economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability34%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only34%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate27%
Parent education - high school graduate25%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)15%
Parent education - college graduate41%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate45%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students54%
Females43%
Males61%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Non-economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate61%
Parent education - high school graduate35%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)38%
Parent education - college graduate57%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate58%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

World History

All Students52%
Females34%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino46%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)60%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability53%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate52%
Parent education - high school graduate28%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)31%
Parent education - college graduate52%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate73%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Algebra II

All Students16%
Females14%
Males18%
African American8%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino7%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)19%
Economically disadvantaged12%
Non-economically disadvantaged19%
Students with disability8%
Students with no reported disability17%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only17%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate0%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate30%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate24%
Parent education - declined to state13%

Biology/Life Sciences

All Students68%
Females72%
Males65%
African American50%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino51%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disability38%
Students with no reported disability72%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate53%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to state64%

Chemistry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Earth Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students63%
Females69%
Males57%
African American50%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino45%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Non-economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate69%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate67%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate79%
Parent education - declined to state58%

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

U.S. History

All Students42%
Females32%
Males52%
African American29%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino26%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Non-economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disability15%
Students with no reported disability45%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only46%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate33%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate46%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate59%
Parent education - declined to state36%

World History

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 83% in 2013.

143 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 84% in 2013.

142 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
96%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) to test high school students' skills in English language arts and mathematics. The results for grade 10 students taking the test for the first time are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The CAHSEE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of California. Students must pass all parts of the CAHSEE in order to graduate from high school. If they do not pass it the first time, students have multiple opportunities to retake the test. The goal is for all students to pass both sections of the test.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students97%
Females95%
Males98%
Gender Unknownn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino93%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Declined to staten/a
Economically disadvantaged94%
Non-economically disadvantaged99%
Economic Status Unknownn/a
Students with disability77%
Tested with modificationsn/a
English learnern/a
Language Fluency Unknownn/a
Migrant educationn/a

Math

All Students98%
Females98%
Males98%
Gender Unknownn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino95%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Declined to staten/a
Economically disadvantaged97%
Non-economically disadvantaged99%
Economic Status Unknownn/a
Students with disability92%
Tested with modificationsn/a
English learnern/a
Language Fluency Unknownn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) to test high school students' skills in English language arts and mathematics. The results for grade 10 students taking the test for the first time are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The CAHSEE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of California. Students must pass all parts of the CAHSEE in order to graduate from high school. If they do not pass it the first time, students have multiple opportunities to retake the test. The goal is for all students to pass both sections of the test.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 40% 26%
Hispanic 27% 52%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 16% 11%
Black 14% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Two or more races 0% 3%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 46%N/A48%
Male 54%N/A51%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 9%N/A55%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 7%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Brett Peterson
Fax number
  • (619) 243-5050

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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2861 Womble Road
San Diego, CA 92106
Website: Click here
Phone: (619) 243-5000

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