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Old Town Academy K-8 Charter

Charter | K-8 | 252 students

K-8 Project-Based Learning with Focus on Music, Math, Science, and Robotics.

 

Living in San Diego

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $290,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,350.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 7 ratings
2013:
Based on 15 ratings
2012:
Based on 16 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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38 reviews of this school


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Posted June 13, 2014

Our neighborhood school was unacceptable, and not a good fit for our kids. We were going to stretch our budget almost to a breaking point to have them attend private school. Thankfully, we "won the lottery" and were chosen for this wonderful public charter school. The Core Knowledge curriculum is thorough and does a great job of building on knowledge gained in prior grades. The "extracurricular" things like art, music, and character building have been incorporated into the regular curriculum. Kids are inspired and challenged. The parents have a say but don't run the show. The teachers are dedicated and resourceful. Overall, it is a happy, creative learning environment. Every staff person knows my kids' names. My smart-but-shy daughter has come out of her shell and is proud to present her projects in front of her class. I would grade this school as an A+.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2014

We have been at the school from the its start and it has been terrific for our son. The small size of the school and the caring administration have been wonderful. Our son gets overwhelmed by too many people and this was a perfect match. The administration and teachers all know and greet him every day. He feels welcome at the school and is comfortable speaking his mind because he knows everyone's contributions are welcome at the school. He is doing well academically, better than at other schools because he can stay on task in the smaller class room. The science lab is great, much better than his old school where the science class was so big they never got to do any experiments or interesting projects. The teachers are on point and do a super job both teaching and providing support for the kids. Having one class per grade and one teacher per grade makes all the difference. We will miss OTA next year when our son transitions to high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 4, 2014

Old Town Academy - I just visited my 1st grade grandchildren and was amazed at what they are studying, from fossils to Mayan history and early civilization.The projects my 4th grade grandson has done are mind boggling. He is doing things we did in high school in the 50's. B.D. Vogelzang


Posted April 2, 2014

Old Town Academy (OTA) offers an intimate, safe, and nurturing environment for students. My child was being bullied at his previous middle school. At OTA, there is zero tolerance for this type of behavior and the staff/teachers know each child. Teaching is tailored as much as possible to the students' learning style and level of understanding.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2014

You can see from reading the comments above that OTA is not the school for everyone. I almost laughed out loud when I read that the teachers don t care about students that is the very thing that makes OTA so special, the do care. To prove it both years I have been here I have had at least three teachers stay after school on their own time to do work with me. However I do agree that OTA will accept low quality work. I could get away with turning in the same quality work in 5th grade as now in 8th. That led me to be frustrated when I first came to OTA. The fact that they seem to care more about the quantity than the quality. But really if you kid is willing to put in the effort than the results are unbelievable. In short if your child is not self-driven and does not push them self, then you child does not belong at OTA.


Posted February 4, 2014

We've been at this school for 3 years, and experienced grades K-4. It's not perfect - what school is? There are improvements to be made. However, the last two years have each had wonderful, surprising levels of growth in educational offerings. Wonderful to see a school that is nimble and adapts. A school that identifies faults, moves to solutions on improving those faults. There are times when I have a concern, comment or suggestion and I have a friendly, open and honest conversation - with a teacher or a staff person. Some of my suggestions have been immediately implemented! Some teachers teach closer to Core Knowledge than others. It would be nice as the school moves forward to see some teacher development. While I do see a core group of "super parent volunteers", I haven't felt a "clique". Also, for those families that didn't find what they wanted at OTA, find out which grade their child was in, and whether your child is going into that same grade. Overall, I'm very happy with my children's school. I frequently wonder at how happy every member of my family is - my husband, both of our kids and finally, me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 22, 2014

In need of documented processes that incorporates checks and balances, run by the parents, and not the Director's Crew for Board Members.


Posted September 20, 2013

Two years in and my kids are doing great. This school may not be for everyone as I have seen some disgruntled reviews. Hopefully those parents have found a better fit for them and their kids. As for our family, this school has been a great experience for our kids. This year OTA is implementing character coaching based on researched traits for success and happiness in life. They are learning that good grades are nice but that being the best you can personally be is even better. Another addition this year is orchestra for all kids from 5th grade up. The programs this school has integrated with the basic California educational requirements is to be applauded. We are so proud this school does not "teach to the state test" and still scored a 901. It's a challenging workload for the kids but, at least for mine, it's paying off. To people who have commented the school is run like a business. I don't have a problem with that. The administration gets grants and much needed funding to keep moving forward. In just two years it's astounding what they have done along with a lot of dedicated parent volunteers. The school isn't perfect but it's really delivering for my kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2013

ota is an out of the box learning environment. when i evaluate schools, i not only look at reviews and testing scores, i tour and listen to my instincts on the type of fit for my kids. this school is an amazing fit for my girls. i feel so lucky to have found it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2013

I love OTA! I am more than satisfied with the quality of my children's education, the dedication of the faculty and staff, the hands on learning approach and core knowledge curriculum. ALL of the families and kids that I have met and worked with are also as dedicated to the school and love it as much as I. Therefore, I was very surprised to see, a few reviews were so rancorous and petty. No single entity is "perfect" and for everyone. It would be foolish to believe that, however, the OTA faculty and staff are constantly striving to find the best and most effective teaching and learning atmosphere- if something doesn't work they discard it, but if it does, they strive to perfect it! I know that they "bend over backwards" to help kids that are struggling. I certainly hope this disgruntled parent, if so unhappy with the school, has with drawn her child because there are MANY kids and families that are wishing a spot would open up for them! . During the school year, OTA usually runs a tour once a week- call, make an appointment and see for yourself. OTA is a phenomenal place! I sincerely hope your child is lucky enough to attend!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2013

Nobody cares about your kid. If you complain you might as well paint a target on your child's back. Don't go there, it's a bad place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 7, 2013

School is run as a business, nothing is about the kids...such a shame. The promise was good, too bad they don't execute it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 7, 2013

OTA has been a great experience for my children. Music/Piano twice every week, lots of PE, art science, project-based learning. My kids actually like going to school! The teachers are dedicated and professional and I always see them after school offering free tutoring and running clubs. They also welcome parents into the class to help teach art, math, reading, even Seminar (every kid is in "Seminar" here). My only complaint is the wait list is so long I cant get my cousins or my friend's kids in.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 1, 2013

Every time there is a bad review, there is an immediate good review to follow...intriguing. School non-bullying police only applies to some. Arrogant administration. School will probably be good in a few years, right now is not well structured to deliver what they promised 2 years ago. I don't think the Core knowledge is presented correctly. The grading system is not good, my child only has A's and B's at OTA but when I got him tested in 4 different private schools, NONE accepted him, he was not at the level where he should be with the grades he has. I showed his work(to which he received a passing grade at OTA) to the Principals and they were baffled, they said his work was so incomplete and they would have never accepted that ( but it was accepted at OTA, which high scoring). Hopefully one day they will achieve their goal of education, their promise is great, but the delivery is not promising. This is my opinion (and probably of those who ran out of there on the first year),like others said, do your research. I want my child to go to a school where he can be prepared for what is to come, high school, college, career, and right now OTA is not it. Out There Alone
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 24, 2013

As a student who had spent her entire life in private schools, I was curious to see how an institute that does not charge tuition could still claim to offer a hands-on learning environment. I was not disappointed. Due to the brevity of my internship, I worked exclusively with the kindergarten and the seventh grade. The kindergarten was a mixture of both new and old learning techniques that ranged from measuring items around the room with a string in order to comprehend the concepts of "shorter" and "longer" to "play time" on ipads that offered reading comprehension, math, and music games. The seventh grade was also a mix of the novel and the traditional. Instead of tests, oral exams were administered to quiz the students' comprehension of class material and a seminar discussion was held at the end of the week in order to teach students how to both argue their opinions while respectfully listening to their fellow students. Although my brief visit was limited to only these two grades, I have no doubt the remainder of the staff and student body at Old Town Academy are as impressive as the ones I had the chance to work with.


Posted June 22, 2013

O - outrageous T - tyrannical A - amoral Don't recommend drinking their "Kool Aid"
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2013

If you are looking for something different - OTA is certainly that! If you try to compare it with a typical state school, you won't get very far. You can safely ignore the 1 star ratings... those people obviously wanted something else and good luck to them in their search. We can all do better, and that goes for OTA, but the point about OTA is that it is oozing opportunity. Your child will have to learn how to make the best of the opportunities, and how to become a responsible individual. Orchestra, languages, innovative math program, hand-on science explorations, varied field trips, marshal arts, sailing....... the list goes on. it is hard work, but if you and your child 'get' OTA, there is no richer, more real-world place to learn. Judge for yourself.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2013

Leadership is weak. Parents not welcomed, only when convenient. I too expected more. Its just not preparing my child for the future. I understand the hands on and the independence of the program, but considering that most kids came from regular traditional schools (this is a2 years old school), they give the children no guidance. I don't like it, I don't like their grade system, I don't think the grades my child receives reflects what my child should know. I wish they could do better, I do see potential though, we just can't wait for it to get better. That's just my opinion.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2013

OTA is an amazing school! The principle, teachers and staff strive to help students achieve goals and thrive. The 3rd grade, for example, completed their core knowledge curriculum a month in advance and have been spending the remaining school time working on a presentation/ performance/ awards ceremony and taking great field trips..! They have an amazing hands on learning/ project-based science program and robotics program, all students learn to play the piano or can participate in orchestra , recess is supervised and games/ activities are set up to keep kids active and not sitting on the fence gossiping, there are amazing parent volunteers assisting with everything from seminar discussions, hot lunch, teaching art, helping in the classrooms or sharing skills in meaningful ways with the students. They also go to great lengths to work with families of troubled students to resolve issues and fix problems. I think OTA is an incredible school, I am more than satisfied with my children's education and I look forward to seeing the school becoming an even more amazing place- (it only just completed its second year- it really is a marvel!)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 7, 2013

Not happy with it. I expected a lot more from this school when I enrolled my child 2 years ago.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

901

Change from
2012 to 2013

+16

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

901

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+16

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
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2011

 
 
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2010

 
 
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Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
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2011

 
 
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2010

 
 
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Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
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2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
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Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
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English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
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2012

 
 
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2011

 
 
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2010

 
 
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Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
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2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students84%
Females91%
Males80%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students92%
Females91%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students72%
Females83%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students93%
Females100%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students82%
Females92%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students92%
Females92%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students78%
Femalesn/a
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability78%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented73%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students93%
Femalesn/a
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students85%
Femalesn/a
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability85%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students73%
Femalesn/a
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented73%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students82%
Femalesn/a
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability82%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented83%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Females83%
Males87%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students78%
Females75%
Males80%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students61%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students61%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students42%
Femalesn/a
Males55%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)54%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students61%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 71% 26%
Hispanic 19% 52%
Black 3% 6%
Two or more races 3% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 11%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 42%N/A48%
Male 58%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 13%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
Special education coordinator
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by school staff Japanese
Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Extra learning resources offered
  • Differentiated learning programs
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Technology
Staff resources available to students
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab

Arts & music

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Music
Staff resources available to students
  • Music teacher(s)
Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Chamber music
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing and written arts
  • Poetry
Media arts
  • Graphics

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Afterschool Mandarin and Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
School leaders can update this information here.

School basics

School start time
  • 8:10 am
School end time
  • 3:00 pm
School Leader's name
  • Thomas Donahue
Gender
  • Coed
Is there an application process?
  • Yes

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Active Learning Design
  • Core knowledge
  • Project-based
  • STEM
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Science
  • Technology
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Foreign languages taught
  • Afterschool Mandarin and Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
  • Special education coordinator
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Japanese
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Differentiated learning programs
  • Mentoring
  • Tutoring
Transportation options
  • None
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Computer lab
School leaders can update this information here.

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Flag football
  • Judo / Other Martial Arts
  • Soccer
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Judo / Other Martial Arts
  • Soccer
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Chamber music
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing arts
  • Poetry
Media arts
  • Graphics
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Coach sports teams or extracurricular activities
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Present special topics during curricular units
  • Volunteer in the classroom
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?


1 out of 10students were accepted for the 2013-2014 school year.


Students accepted for the 2013-2014 school year
34
Applications received for the 2013-2014 school year
240

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
High Tech Charter High
Coleman Tech Charter High School
Private High Schools
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

2120 San Diego Avenue
San Diego, CA 92110
Website: Click here
Phone: (619) 574-6225

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