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GreatSchools Rating

Santa Monica Alternative (K-8) School

Public | K-8 | 227 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

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Parent involvement

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22 reviews of this school


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Posted May 9, 2014

Smash is an amazing school and I am so grateful everyday that my daughter goes there. This was our 1st year at SMASH and the teachers and principle surpassed my expectations. They speak to children with such honor and respect. Not shaming them and finding every opportunity as a way to teach children. The faculty at this school work from a conscious mind set and find creative ways to educate children. They spend a lot of time developing the child from the inside out and really help foster children's emotions. If the world could operate like this school, the world would be a better place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 19, 2013

This school values and supports the child's inquisitive mind and natural desire to learn and be a full participant in his/her world, unique and wonderful in a overall public education system enslaved to race to nowhere state testing and funding/ranking issues. Has a wonderful community of caring parents along with many of its teachers, and children w ho feel part of a bigger picture- learning to be good citizens in the world. In certain cases "alternative" however seems to include a lack of accountability around state benchmarks and curriculum, particularly in math, even where they are developmentally appropriate. There also seems to be an "alternative" approach to sound protocols around classroom management , school operations and student behavior, which is confusing at best at times. Small classroom size is a huge plus in terms of following student interests and projects, and instilling joy in learning rather than rote. Middle school is not fraught with the normal "risk" behaviors that emerge at this age at other schools- a huge plus. There is no principal or asst principal on site a couple of days a week- this can be problematic along w/ other leadership issues.


Posted October 4, 2012

This school has probably the most involved, cohesive group of parents in the school district. Educational quality tends to be very good in the lower grades and spotty at best in the middle grades. Don't come expecting any real connection to John Dewey and his educational models. Let's call this progressive lite, at best. What really draws people to the school is the small size. Academic rigor is either absent or arbitrary. Although not openly discussed, most parents heavily supplement their children's education outside of school. In general 3/5 of families who try the school love it and 2/5 hate it and leave. Only you can tell which group you'll fall into.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2011

This is a great school for students who are considered at risk academically for an array of reasons. One of the problems with at-risk students is that they felt lost and isolated in the large school and once they enter this school they feel a sense of community. Special-needs students need to feel comfortable in an inclusion setting. If they do not, they should consider other restrictive settings i.e. separate classroom, separate school, residential school and home/hospital.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 21, 2011

AMAZING school. Best thing about it is the size - only 230 kids kindergarten THRU 8th grade. So you virtually know every family. And the principal knows EVERY family personally. VERY community oriented. The way they teach (project based, multi-age, wholechild approach) actually enables kids to learn DEEPER and more PROFOUNDLY (instead of quickly and by route). Because of this approach, my child placed ADVANCED in Reading/Writing AND math on the state examines. So - don't buy into believing that this is not an academic school and that there is no structure. There IS structure, a ton of it, but it is organic and pertinent. YES - there is homework - but it is never for the sake of just keeping your kids busy. FYI - most of the kids who graduate SMASH transition smoothly into SAMOHI and do amazingly well in Honors and AP courses.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2010

If your child is lucky enough to get in (admission is by lottery), you have hit the lottery. Children learn the standard grade-appropriate curriculum, but in a different way. Learing is project-based as opposed to text-book based. The projects are chosen based on student interest. Classes are smaller. Teacher/student relationships and the classroom are less formal. There is more give-and-take. More respect of the students' interests, contributions and ideas. Overall, SMASH provides a much less restrictive and more creative learning environmet.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2010

The children at SMASH are respected as valuable and capable individuals in their community. The SMASH teaching philosophy targets the student as a whole person not just an academic vessel, and allows each child to blossom according to their own unique talents and personality.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 25, 2009

Easy going school, fun for kids and parents, but academically weak in many areas. Reading/writing is great, but very, very weak in math and there is barely any science there. Too bad, since the school has a lot to offer, it's small and intimate, teachers and staff are caring, families and kids feel part of a community, they treat kids with respect and teach them to act responsibly. All of that is fantastic, but for SMASH to be a great school, it needs to improve on actual education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2009

It's a great school that teaches children to love learning. The kids get all the skills they'd get in any other school, but at SMASH they remain curious, active participants in their education. The school has a dedicated staff and administration, but could not do what they do without a strong PTSO. The parents take up where the state and city leave off. In these tough economic times, it is really what makes the difference.


Posted September 18, 2009

Love the amazing community and the sensitivity and insight brought to each child. Very child centered approach to learning and my Kindergartner is on fire to do/learn more w/ engaging, experiential learning and well contained classroom. One query- why are the APIs so low when other 'alternative' type schools have good scores (such as OPEN Charter and Ocean Charter). I think the standardized testing can become a tyrant- informing all that goes on (much of it rote) in classrooms, but it's good for kids to be able to be strong thinkers and have some of hte traditional skills. What can SMASH learn from alternative schools whose students seem to have both skill sets?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

This an amazing school. There is a robust social curriculum as well as an amazing academic one! The children learn to love learning, to be independent critical thinkers and to be responsible, caring members of a community!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

This school is so amazing - my son is learning so much and really loves going to school - the teachers are exciting and interesting and everyone is very involved in the day to day activities. Bravo SMASH!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 3, 2009

We love SMASH. It is a smaller school and children get a lot of attention and room to explore their own interests while developing socially. The progressive eduction is surprisingly academic and the school has very high standards for education. In response to another review, I'm aware that one class had a large number of energetic challenging students that sometimes were rambunctious. This is the exception, not the rule. Generally SMASH has a high degree of parent participation in the classroom and is able to help a wide range of kids succeed. Much time is spent helping the students communicate with each other and work out issues. A wonderful school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2009

Great, progressive curriculum but disruptive and harsh social environment. Kids are left to 'fend for themselves' and sort out social problems without help from the teachers, which leads to a gang-like atmousphere. We are VERY disappointed in the social curriculum and probably won't stay at this school. If you have a sensitive, highly intelligent child, there are better places to look.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2009

SMASH is a great school. My daughter has developed so much, not just academically but also as a person. SMASH offers a wonderful learning environment and has great teachers. What I like the most is that my daughter doesn't feel stressed about her work load but excited to learn more.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 27, 2008

its an exellent system my daughter goes there
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2008

I don't go a day when I am not thankful that my daughter goes to SMASH. The teachers and staff are great, and the method of teaching creates an group of kids who are thinking for one's self, while respecting each other's ideas. I feel like the way they learn is preparing them for college - even when they are only in kindergarten or first grade!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 7, 2008

SMASH is a school of choice. Students are chosen from a lottery so most parents are like minded in their vision for progessive education. There isn't a one size fits all mentality. Students are encouraged to work at a pace that is comfortable and at the same time challenging for themselves. The student body is small (20-22 kids per grade) so the community is very tight. Middle school kids have reading buddies in the lower grades and there is an absence of bullying and peer pressure. Our experience so far has been fantastic.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 26, 2007

Everyday we feel lucky to come to this school. And we feel that it's not only a school, it's a community. Students, parents and teachers are all involved. It's a smaller school with tighter focus per child than larger schools. By the way, SMASH has art, music and language programs that are funded by the SMASH PTSA. Speaking of the PTSA, there is an incredible amount of parent involvement at this school. Lots of fundraisers (though no more than other public school and possibly less than some private schools) which help to build that community feeling along with funds for special programs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 8, 2006

Great school. Loved it!
—Submitted by a teacher


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

812

Change from
2012 to 2013

N/A

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

N/A

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

N/A


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.

This school's
API score

812

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

N/A

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

N/A

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

N/A

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
60%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
48%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
85%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

17 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
30%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
62%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
38%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
53%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
63%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
18%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
77%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
33%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
6%

2010

 
 
13%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
65%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
26%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
44%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students50%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students58%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students48%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)42%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only47%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students56%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)55%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students72%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state71%

Math

All Students41%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)38%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged41%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability44%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only38%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state46%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students66%
Females73%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state58%

Math

All Students43%
Females27%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)40%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability50%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only43%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state42%

Science

All Students34%
Females36%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)40%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged32%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability33%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state33%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Females87%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state86%

Math

All Students70%
Females73%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)72%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability77%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students73%
Females73%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state76%

Math

All Students64%
Females73%
Males55%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students21%
Females36%
Males12%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)29%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged27%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability24%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only22%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students57%
Females82%
Males41%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)59%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students39%
Females55%
Males29%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)41%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability44%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only41%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students57%
Females82%
Males41%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)59%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 60%
Two or more races 21%
Hispanic 11%
Asian 4%
Black 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 5%N/AN/A
English language learners 3%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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2525 Fifth Street
Santa Monica, CA 90405
Phone: (310) 396-2640

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