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GreatSchools Rating

Global Village Academy

Charter | K-8 | 889 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 19 ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 9 ratings
2011:
Based on 7 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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54 reviews of this school


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Posted October 8, 2014

The last post on 10/2/2014 is so TRUE. If I can give this school a lower star I would. Horrible school. This school testing scores are soooo low, that if your child were to attend another school, your child will fail. If your child is smart, the teacher will hold your child back so that the other children can catch up. They teach the children to tell if they see bullying but punish the teller or re-victimizing the victim all over again. Teachers tell the kids to disobey their parent and when called on the bad advise, the teacher wants to cry intimidation. The administration says "you don't want to be known as the parent who goes off on a teacher...then the student will suffer from your actions". This statement was from their student Coordinator Ms. Houghtaling. If you ask to see the "teacher" credentials, they will not be told to you. Half of the teachers just have a certificate that's not up to the standards to the US let alone the National teachers standards. Kids everywhere at all times Not even in class. Teachers can't control their classrooms. Traffic is out of control. The school is supposed to be "culturally diverse" but it's not. HORRIBLE school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2014

Contrary to the previous post about how "great" GVA is, there is more to education than parental involvement. While it is key, parents who work hard to be there for their children also deserve the same attentiveness and care from staff who work for and with their children. GVA Aurora is simply not a school that supports ALL of the families and their students that attend this school! The focus is NOT negativity, but rather truth. GVA Aurora is not a great school and ALL the concerns presented are facts; the truth! The facility is filthy, carlines are totally unsafe though there are extremely rude staff members who attempt to "direct traffic", the only parents who have no problem with issues like these are those who are comfortable with below average education. All children, no matter ability deserve the best education. All the "supportive" parents claim your child must be practically perfect to attend GVA, so basically ALL special needs or other so called


Posted September 29, 2014

Both of my kids attend GVA, and love it. I make sure to work very closely with their teachers and staff to ensure the best education possible. The reviews left by other parents are quite negative, and I understand their concerns, however if you do have a well behaved child who is open to learning and you are there to guide them, they will do just fine. If you are a lazy parent who does not stay involved with your child's academics, do not send them here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2014

IGNORANCE IS NOT BLISS. If you are a parent with a child at GVA read the reviews, visit unannounced and volunteer. You will pull your child out! What actually happens during the day is not what you think. Ask for proof of teachers credentials and is they were validated as well as the principal. You will be shocked. Not only are there academic concerns there are security concerns. They didn't see me or question me when I walked onto the playground and picked up my son at lunch!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2014

This school is underrated. Yeah the language is a challenge but don't you think it school should be challenging! Yes if your child already has a disability maybe this isn't the school for your student- the language may be too much~! The traffic is horrible anywhere unless you use the bus and in my opinion this is an great chance for my child to be tri-lingual! The Spanish program is getting better and better with each year. My daughter is in 3rd and is able to read, write and communicate in English and Spanish. Don't pass this chance up just because a few parents get don't the program or hate the traffic.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 3, 2014

This school was the worst thing that ever happened to our son who is now in 7th grade. He went to GVA for 1st grade and had huge struggles. We didn't know that he had an actual disability at the time, but I can tell you for sure that this school was absolutely not equipped to manage a child with any special learning issues of any kind. They do not have the staff. But worse than that, it was clear that they just wanted our son to go away. They had no solutions and did not care in the slightest. Teneshia Taylor was the only person who was concerned about the kids but she had zero support from the principle or anyone else. It was a terrible joke and a mess. Its was so disappointing because the concept was absolutely wonderful. But when you have incompetent people in charge, it doesn't matter how great the concept is. I wasn't ever going to write this review but when I happened upon this site and the reviews I saw here, I see that nothing has changed. DO NOT ever send your child here if you feel that they will need any additional help or cooperation beyond the regular classroom. They will not get it here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 6, 2014

This school is not good. The principle has no respect to parents. The classroom is over crowded, no enough table, each table jammed up with over 6 kids. No playground, they let kids running on the parking lot. Many teachers have no certificates. Traffic is always more than a nightmare, gosh, no way to get in to the school, then once get in, then no way to get out, entrance is also exit. When my kid was there, I was unhappy and stressed everyday.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2014

I have mixed emotions about this school. It started out with a great vision but somewhere along the way that vision was lost. Over-crowded classes, east campus is a pig style, teachers look overwhelmed and the place is chaotic. I think if they had taken time to perfect their model instead of the rapid expansion and "lets get as many kids as we can cram into classes" model, it would have been a great school. We finally decided to pull our kids out after this school year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2014

Love this school! Like every school, especially charters, there are things that could be better but there is no place else in Aurora that students can learn French and Mandarin. My child has been here for several years and is able to communicate and learn in a language we don't speak at home. I love the diversity of her friends and classmates and Singapore math is great. Teachers care about their students like most teachers but she has been introduced to cultures from around the world. Getting my student to be both bilingual and literate in multiple languages are worth the things that are not perfect.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2014

My daughter has been going to GVA since kindergarten French, on fall she will go to 3rd grade. She's been doing great with French. I'm very pleased with the reading and math program. The staff has always been super friendly and helpful. I'm looking forward to enroll my son in kindergarden Spanish immersion on fall. I recommend this school to everybody. About the principal Barbara Ridenour I think she is doing her job right. I asked her support in a personal situation my family is going through by writing a letter which she was able to do and she denied the help. That was hurtful because I have been supporting the school for a long time; but that doesn't make the school bad or whatsoever. That is the only complaint I have about GVA.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2014

I was a previous student at this school and this school was the worst school i ever went to i was just in third grade and they were teaching me eighth grade math and to do math backwards and when ever my teachers handed me homework it was way above my learning level and i almost lost it i was running up and down the halls because the work was too much for me to understand i was only 9 when this was happening this also effected many other students in this dreaded school DON'T Ever Send Your Kids To This School! EVER! it will almost drive them to a mental breakdown like it almost did to me as a former student of this school i tell you to never send your kids to this school and if i could i would rate this school a 0 out of 10.


Posted May 20, 2014

It is painful for me to think about this school. The administration lacks leadership and it feels like nothing can be done without the approval of the Executive Principal. This is frustrating and disheartening because I expect the Principal at the school to have some authority to make decisions. The staff is grumpy and unhappy. There is so much division between the teachers that you can hear the gossip when you walk in the door. The school is filthy. The Gym is disgusting, the bathrooms are dirty, dust and grime are thick, and there is random 2nd hand furniture everywhere. Whoever is in charge of cleaning and maintenance is making money without fully doing their job. This school just does not make sense! We are withdrawing our children and are not looking back.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2014

My daughter is in the 1st grade mandarin program and loves it, she is speaking her immersion language in the advanced category already.I went to 8 schools before she started kindergarten but was afraid she would get bored because she knew kindergarten curriculum at age 3. I am really glad I found this school because now she can learn it all in a new language. That being said this school may not be a good fit if a child is behind in English already and you can not work with them at home since the first year is 100% immersion and is I think 80% for 1st and 2nd. Overall I have had a great experience with the staff and school as a whole, they allow you to be as involved as you want and the one time my daughter did have an issue it got handled the very same day. I can't complain.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2014

My daughter is in Sr Aguayo's Spanish kindergarten class! That man is a god send! Yes my kinder comes home with A TON of homework but just how much she has grown throughout this has truly been amazing! Test scores are low with the school but to be fair they all spend there day learning there immersion language yet Colorado makes us test in English. Sinta who works the desk also very relatable as well as Maria my daughter is always excited to walk in to school and see them both. Yes it's a big school but my child is not just a number to them everybody has truly taken the time to get to know her and what works best for her to learn. I love that GVA is our school and I'm truly excited to see how my child grows in her immersion language because of GVA!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2014

Not a very good school. The teachers are fine and some care, but the administration only cares about themselves. They don't treat the staff well, the quality of education is poor and they continuously change teachers because it is CHEAPER for them to do so.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 12, 2014

Terrible school! Extremely high turnover in administration, teachers and students. Test scores are low, academics is low too. The board does not manage the school instead they allow one person to dictate (The Executive Principal). The parking situation is a nightmare! There is no playground even though parents have raised money in the past for one. Executive Principal is not there for the best interest of children, they are only numbers for her. The immersion language concept is good, however there is no fidelity. Steer Clear for your own sanity!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 14, 2014

This school is just horrendous. My son has been at this school 2 years and I hate taking him everyday. The Executive Principal is a JOKE and is NEVER available to speak to parents, the onsite Principal is passive aggressive and never seems as if she truly wants to interact with parents. My sons teachers in the Mandarin program have been OK except this year. The teacher refuses to grade the students based on their work, and when you ask questions about your child she is always defensive and disturbingly aggressive. The parking situation is a nightmare and the teachers that aid in traffic sit around like thugs urging parents to move their cars even when your child is not buckled up! Several students have been hit in the loading and unloading zone! Simply put, the apathy from the executive staff, defensive teachers that are "BUSY" when you need to speak about your child's progress, the horrendous building and lack of playground facilities lends this school to a zero star rating in my opinion. Don't send your children here, it would be a mistake and the kids are numbers that are pushed through. If you advocate for your child you will be met with defensiveness! Steer Clear! THE WORST!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 13, 2014

Although the school offers immersion classes that are said to increase the capibility of getting a job the princible is less insistant on improving the schools that are already establitised instead she preferes to build new ones she hasn't gotten rid of the infestation instead increases the wild fire that is global village academy the vice princible desposes of teachers as if they were just an object of money so what ever you do DO NOT PUT YOUR CHIDEREN IN GLOBAL VILLAGE ACADEMY (you'd ruin their lives and make them antisocial)


Posted January 28, 2014

This is my son's 6th year at GVA. I also have two daughters in the lower grades. Although I had very high hopes for immersion education, I can't say it's been a success. My daughters are doing well and have learned Spanish fairly well for their respective ages, but my son is very far behind in his language track and no one noticed until this year. Although he's very good at math, his grades have been horrendous due to his inability to understand the Spanish instructions this year. The school had no structured immersion language curriculum until this year. My daughters have time to catch up, but my son does not. It's been a very frustrating year and we are looking at other schools at this point. As a previous person noted, immersion teachers are here on 3 year visas, so teacher turnover is constant. The best teachers seem to leave the soonest, unfortunately. Brilliant idea, poor execution.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 29, 2013

My school is global village academy in AURORA..I cannot thank Mr. Aguayo enough for teaching my son since kindergarten. He is the the most amazing teacher any parent can ask for. Also have to applaud the Principal for what she helped with my child...awesome school..I am am very blessed with the front desk..SO WELCOMEING
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
52%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
65%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 51% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
38%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

111 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
52%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

111 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
62%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 53% in 2013.

111 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
31%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
36%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
47%
Science

The state average for Science was 49% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
18%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 57% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
34%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 62% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
55%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
69%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 58% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
51%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
10%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
44%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 61% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
37%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
15%

2012

 
 
21%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
48%
Science

The state average for Science was 52% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
15%

2012

 
 
21%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 56% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
43%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female52%
Male45%
Black (not Hispanic)44%
Asiann/a
Hispanic43%
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Free lunch eligible40%
Reduced lunch eligible55%
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities51%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)47%
Proficient in English56%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant50%

Reading

All Students63%
Female70%
Male50%
Black (not Hispanic)75%
Asiann/a
Hispanic57%
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Free lunch eligible55%
Reduced lunch eligible60%
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities66%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)60%
Proficient in English72%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant63%

Writing

All Students27%
Female30%
Male21%
Black (not Hispanic)19%
Asiann/a
Hispanic23%
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)31%
Free lunch eligible21%
Reduced lunch eligible15%
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch43%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities28%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)13%
Proficient in English41%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant27%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students48%
Female44%
Male53%
Black (not Hispanic)52%
Asiann/a
Hispanic33%
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Free lunch eligible43%
Reduced lunch eligible39%
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch57%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities48%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)28%
Proficient in English59%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant48%

Reading

All Students50%
Female55%
Male43%
Black (not Hispanic)59%
Asiann/a
Hispanic27%
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Free lunch eligible41%
Reduced lunch eligible39%
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch64%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities51%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)13%
Proficient in English70%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant50%

Writing

All Students35%
Female44%
Male24%
Black (not Hispanic)44%
Asiann/a
Hispanic18%
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)45%
Free lunch eligible27%
Reduced lunch eligible28%
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch48%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities36%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)16%
Proficient in English43%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant35%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students43%
Female37%
Male49%
Black (not Hispanic)56%
Asiann/a
Hispanic34%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible24%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch58%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities44%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)19%
Proficient in English53%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant42%

Reading

All Students58%
Female54%
Male63%
Black (not Hispanic)75%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible43%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch71%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities60%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)45%
Proficient in English71%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant59%

Science

All Students25%
Female20%
Male30%
Black (not Hispanic)44%
Asiann/a
Hispanic16%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible14%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch34%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities26%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)10%
Proficient in English39%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant26%

Writing

All Students41%
Female44%
Male37%
Black (not Hispanic)50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic34%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible27%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch50%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities42%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)32%
Proficient in English47%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant40%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students40%
Female28%
Male52%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible28%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities46%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)26%
Proficient in English56%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant40%

Reading

All Students51%
Female53%
Male48%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic44%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible47%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities58%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)11%
Proficient in English63%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant52%

Writing

All Students49%
Female59%
Male39%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic42%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible50%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch58%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities56%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)11%
Proficient in English63%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students36%
Female31%
Male44%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic32%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible36%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities39%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)12%
Proficient in English59%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant36%

Reading

All Students53%
Female50%
Male57%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible47%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities56%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)12%
Proficient in English94%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant53%

Writing

All Students53%
Female56%
Male48%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic42%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible42%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities56%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)12%
Proficient in English82%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant53%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students15%
Female6%
Male24%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic12%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible14%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities19%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant13%

Reading

All Students49%
Female44%
Male52%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic48%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible52%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities58%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant47%

Science

All Students15%
Female17%
Male14%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic12%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible14%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities16%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant13%

Writing

All Students41%
Female45%
Male38%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic44%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligible43%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities48%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant39%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Below average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

23%
of schools in the state are Below average
52%
of schools in the state are Average
24%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Colorado. Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

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10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
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10

Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

2 This rating is based on 2011-12 and 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in Math, English Language Arts, and Writing from the state of Colorado.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 51% 32%
White 19% 56%
Black 18% 5%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 8% 3%
Two or more races 5% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 56%N/A41%
Male 47%N/A51%
Female 53%N/A49%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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403 South Airport Blvd
Aurora, CO 80017
Website: Click here
Phone: (303) 309-6657

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