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GreatSchools Rating

Ridgeview Classical Charter Schools

Charter | K-12 | 774 students

Our school is best known for providing a robust liberal arts education.

 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 10 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 13 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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72 reviews of this school


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Posted June 24, 2014

The students that I know that go to this school are very prideful and they are taught to act this way by the teachers.


Posted April 30, 2014

I love the way my students think outside the box, and carry themselves as responsible teenagers! Ridgeview Classical Schools has contributed to the molding and shaping of my kids into not only exceptional academic students with great communication skills, it has made them teenagers that are articulate, concise, compassionate, and proud of their own accomplishments. Ridgeview has had an impact on how my students think not only about themselves, but just as important, how they think about their fellow students, their school, their community, and their country. I know I will be sending my students off into the world of adulthood with a confidence in themselves that will be an asset to them no matter what their endeavors. My students converse with any age group from many walks of life with poise and confidence. They have thoughtful input on their future, and the future of the world around them. The teachers at Ridgeview obviously love to teach and appear to be genuinely interested in their students From History and Latin, Math to Music I would recommend Ridgeview to any parent who is looking for a school that brings out the best in their children, academically and individually.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2014

We have been with Ridgeview for five years now. We've had some ups & downs, but I dont see the grass being greener anyplace else. School is hard work for both parents & students. Each student is a little different, so is each family. What makes these reviews humorous is that we know exactly what we are getting when we signed up - we all sign paperwork stating that we understand the dress code/agree to support it, the same for character, homework, and the overall rigor. Has every teacher been our favorite? No. Has every day been heaven? Of course not. The good teachers though are incredible better than anything I ever had.. The leadership has changed. Such things happen. We ve been happy with the new leadership. The school has become even more classically oriented, it s clear it values our values, and the kids have more opportunities than ever before. At the end of the day it is a school of choice, and each year we are free to make a decision about whether to return. I can t imagine leaving, but it s probable that we choose to return for some of the same reasons others choose not to. The kids here have it very good IMO, far better than any other students I have met.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2014

I have 3 children at RCS now, the leadership needs improvement. The uniform code is not upheld for every student. The assistant principal's step daughter is allowed to wear items that don't line up with policy continuously, while other kids get sent to the office for wearing brown boots that clearly fall within the policy. Teacher turn over this year has been quite high due to the new leadership. My son has had 3 different teachers THIS YEAR, they need to gain stability somehow.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 23, 2013

I used to go to this school as a Part time student, and I feel that it was a better school then the one I was a full time student at. If I had the opportunity to, I would have wanted to graduate from this school. The teachers are willing to help you learn and answer any questions you may have when learning. At the other school I was going to, I had to wait whenever I emailed a teacher a question (mostly because it was an online school) but at Ridgeview I felt like I was challenged and learned more. -Former Student


Posted December 20, 2013

I wonder about the value of anonymous reviews. 4 of my kids attended RCS, one from the start. 2 graduated, the last is a senior. I know parents leave without ever talking to a teacher or without providing feedback to RCS. Feedback is always solicited. Some never bother to check facts versus gossip. FACTS: there has NEVER been an RCS elementary class over 31 students. RCS has a high number of special needs students. Parents have told me they pull their kids BEFORE high school to get the elementary rigor but want the "easier" grades their kids will get from other senior high schools to make it easier for their kids to get into college. I prefer to pursue education for the sake of education. I'd rather have my kids get educated "C's" at RCS than easy "A's" elsewhere. A HUGE part of my kid's education at RCS is, thankfully, the "conversation"; examine all sides of a topic with true academic freedom, for learning's sake. Frankly, all kids may not achieve at a rigorous level, one of mine didn't, AND I don't blame RCS! Thanks for school choice! If it doesn't work for me I can leave. I long for space to address the "elitist" slur. As if real learning is somehow demeaning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 6, 2013

Seriously. This school was horrible. Teachers were far more willing to accept a 7 page paper of useless information and filler words than they were a 3 page paper of actual content and concise points.


Posted December 4, 2013

How I measure Ridgeview Classical School's success is via the discussions I am able to have with my daughter who is a Junior there and has attended Ridgeview since 3rd Grade. I have also read the thought provoking articles that she brings home. She is able to discuss politics, ethical concerns as well as intellectual ones. Bravo Ridgeview. I suppose an improvement would be a more comprehensive sports and fitness program. I am not opposed to competitive team sports or identifying those who excel in those areas if they wish to pursue sports as their career. It is another area that strengthens discipline. Also an animal program would be nice or art therapy as vocational pursuits, perhaps during the summer academy. How to start your own business would also be a great class as I do not think that option is emphasized enough.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 3, 2013

I've written a post before concerning Ridgeview Classical Schools before. I will write one again. Although I failed to put the star ratings on it. I am going to do it again. As a previous parent and employee of Ridgeview Classical Schools. I give it five stars. Not just for the education but as a great place to work for as well. I have three children. One whom graduated and because of the education he received I am not worried about him making it in this world. I believe because of the education, support, and diversity they have to offer is why he is going to be great in whatever path he chooses! My other two children. I had hoped they too would be able to graduate sadly cannot due to the fact we had to move out if state for my husbands employment. I believe that they have what it takes to help your student achieve the highest potential. I've enjoyed the students and staff. :). Your child or children are in great hands! If ya can't come there because of distance I encourage you to check out other charter schools as well. Your child will receive far better education in Charter vs. Public. Hands down Ridgeview Rocks!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2013

It really surprises me how often disgruntled parents will say that Ridgeview is elitist considering that it has a higher percentage of students with learning disabilities and autism spectrum disorders per capita than the vast majority of schools in the district. Nearly every child who transfers into Ridgeview will find themselves behind the curve. The curriculum is rigorous and many children will begin a semester failing subjects they may have done well in in other schools. It takes time to determine a student's strengths and weaknesses and apply this knowledge to help a student succeed. This process usually takes the first few of months of school or, in the case of one of my children, a couple of years because of his pronounced learning disabilities. It does take a certain amount of perseverance on the part of the student and the parents. In all honesty, a classical school of any kind is not for every child and family and many parents move their children to public school around junior high because they feel their child needs to experience a broader social environment with more activities. It rarely has anything to do with academics.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2013

Our child started off the year (2013/2014) at Ridgeview but was quickly pulled out by my husband and I due to the administration. We were very unhappy to learn that he was failing every class within the first month of school and was still adjusting to the curriculum. We were told by teachers " he needs to do all memorization in class" which was absurd to us. The school says it strives on parent involvement but when you get too involved they look down on it. We contacted the principal and never got a response back until I had to contact his supervisor a week later! We pulled our son out due to felling as though he didn't fit their mold of the perfect child that would help them receive there wonderful test scores. I guess I didn't think about that when I heard there were only about 20 students that graduate at a time! We feel as though if your child is not an independent learner then your child wont succeed. My child was in trouble almost everyday at Ridgeview and since we switched we have had no problems. He is a lot happier not being in the "elite" society. My husband and I both would not recommend this school to anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2013

My kids started Ridgeview a few years ago. It became very apparent that the school is geared toward those kids who are excellent students but unfortunately the average to lower students get left behind. This is validated by the huge turn-over percentage of middle school students. You can verify these numbers by reading the board minutes. This problem has not been fixed and the administration seem not to care. I believe that this is caused by lack of leadership (admin and board level). The high test scores at the high school level are due to weeding out the average and lower students at the lower level to pad there ranking and scores. We will not be enrolling our kids for the 2013 School year. I would not recommend Ridgeview Classical School.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2013

I love Ridgeview! It's a great school for those who enjoy the liberal arts. They give kids a sophisticated education that most adults don't even get. If you ask most adults to give you an analysis on the nature of love and affection on Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, or even a summary of the play,chances are they won't even have a clue. At Ridgeview, this is a required task for the 7th grade! Also, the class sizes are really small in upper school. Usually it is 15 students or less Amazing school. I highly recommend it to anyone who wants their child to be successful.


Posted April 16, 2013

I noticed many of the negative comments on the site have incorrect facts. One comment states that the elementary classes often exceed 35 students. The elementary classes have never exceeded 31 students. Another complains about no extra curricular activities and no sports. There are many extra curricular activities at the school. As for sports, there are Jr. High sports and in high school you may try out at other schools. My daughter has played varsity sports all through her high school career. In addition she has been active in music and student council. One thing I really like about the school is how they celebrate the achievements of their students either in the newsletter or in the quarterly student assembly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2012

My children have attended this school for one year and I must say that I am blown away with the curiculum that this excellent school provides. They do expect a great deal from children academically but in my opinion that instills a work ethic in to children from an early age. The school is not for every child since it is based on a core education. However, if you feel that you child can thrive in a challenging environment, then do him/her a favor and send them to this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 19, 2012

Take my review for what it's worth, because my kids were there several years ago, but I find myself once again researching schools (in another area) and I have some thoughts about what makes a good school or a bad school. There is no question that, while we were there, the academics were strong. I was excited about it at first. Safe environment, motivated students and families. As time wore on, my 2nd and 4th graders, who continue to be excellent students, became very stressed out from the large amount of homework. My 4th grade daughter (top student in her grade last year, and somewhat quiet and shy) complained consistently about her mean teacher. We all know there is a difference between a teacher with high expectations and a mean teacher. Toward the end of the year I felt like the school was just too much into very high control and too low on the humanity/kids factor. Elementary class sizes were larger than 35 at the time. My older son made good friends and seemed to do well, but my experience with 3 kids in the school is that it really is not for everyone, in spite of what they say.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2011

As the mother of a first grader at Ridgeview Classical School in Fort Collins, I have been extremely pleased with our son's educational experience up to this point. Open enrollment at Ridgeview means diversity in the school population, and I appreciate that RCS gives every child the chance to experience a classical education. The teachers at Ridgeview are top notch; they challenge AND encourage the children to be the best student they can be every day. I am grateful for the moral and ethical values that the teachers instill in the children; truly pillars of excellence. When I drop off my son each morning, I am proud to send him to a school with other children whose parents have thoughtfully considered the education of their child(ren). Do your research, check out the orientation. It is worth your time, your child is worth it!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2011

As parents, Ridgeview has exceeded our high expectations. They believe that it is up to the school to educate each student regardless of his or her background (no entrance test). They work hard to build a foundation for a lifetime of learning. There are other elements of the Ridgeview experience that we appreciate as well. Unlike some other schools, there isn't a constant drumbeat of fund-raising forced on the students. There is diversity among the students related to their socio-economic status. There is no forced parental volunteering. Many parents give generously of their time in many different capacities. If parents are unable to volunteer, they are not required to do so (unlike some other schools). The most positive thing I can say about Ridgeview is that they have high expectations. Some interpret that negatively. Instead, it is a blessing to the students. Our children's teachers constantly expect our kids to meet their potential. Nothing is more damaging to a human being than very low expectations. Ridgeview provides an environment where every student is encouraged to reach their potential with resources and caring that gets success.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2011

We are so thankful that our child is able to attend Ridgeview. They truly are a terrific open enrollment school (no testing prior to admission) and work hard to bring every child up to a high standard. They also do this on a much smaller budget than other public schools. The administration and teachers care very much about each and every student. I am amazed at what our child is learning, and how much they love school! They do have higher standards for their behavior which we really appreciate. Please do your own research and come and see Ridgeview for yourself (you can sit in on a class at any time!). We looked at many schools in the district and are very proud to be Hoplites!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2011

We have 3 children attending Ridgeview, in the elementary grades. We have been at the school for 3 years, and I can say that the academics are excellent. Ridgeview uses Singapore Math and Riggs for reading. These two methods of teaching are time intensive for the teacher training and therefore costly to the school -- but they are so beneficial to the children learning to read WELL and process their math. It's not just the right answer that is sought, but truly teaching the students to think intelligently. Character education is highly valued and the teachers teach it well. The students get to take karate, learn Latin, take Spanish from Kindergarten, and start orchestra earlier than other schools. It's a great place for our kids to learn, and it's well worth our drive to take them there. We knew one family that took their kids out of Ridgeview when they reached high school level. The mom regretted it immensely. She said it was like taking a kid out of church and putting him into a strip club. We are thankful for the standards that Ridgeview upholds, and grateful that our kids get to receive an education akin to a private school, at the cost of a public education.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
85%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 51% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
68%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
75%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 53% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
44%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
83%
Science

The state average for Science was 49% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
53%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 57% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
58%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 62% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
97%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 58% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
53%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
84%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 61% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
70%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
96%
Science

The state average for Science was 52% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
72%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 56% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
58%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
87%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 55% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
80%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
89%
Science

The state average for Science was 51% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
75%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 49% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students77%
Female73%
Male82%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch80%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities78%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English78%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant77%

Reading

All Students88%
Female88%
Male89%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English90%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant88%

Writing

All Students72%
Female73%
Male70%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch74%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English73%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant72%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students59%
Female56%
Male61%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English58%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant59%

Reading

All Students71%
Female76%
Male67%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities73%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English70%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant71%

Writing

All Students48%
Female56%
Male42%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)52%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch57%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities49%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English48%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant48%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students60%
Female64%
Male56%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English60%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant60%

Reading

All Students78%
Female82%
Male74%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English78%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant78%

Science

All Students52%
Female58%
Male44%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)59%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities53%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English54%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant52%

Writing

All Students60%
Female73%
Male44%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English60%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant60%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students73%
Female70%
Male80%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities76%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English73%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant73%

Reading

All Students93%
Female93%
Male95%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English93%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant93%

Writing

All Students73%
Female78%
Male65%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English73%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students69%
Female68%
Male70%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch73%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities71%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English69%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant69%

Reading

All Students89%
Female92%
Male80%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English90%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant89%

Writing

All Students84%
Female86%
Male80%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English85%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant84%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students71%
Female70%
Male74%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English71%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant71%

Reading

All Students88%
Female88%
Male87%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English88%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant88%

Science

All Students79%
Female85%
Male70%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English79%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant79%

Writing

All Students82%
Female91%
Male70%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English82%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students54%
Female50%
Male62%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch57%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities55%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English56%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant54%

Reading

All Students97%
Female100%
Male91%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant97%

Writing

All Students93%
Female95%
Male90%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female53%
Male72%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch66%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities65%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English58%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant62%

Reading

All Students93%
Female90%
Male96%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English92%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant93%

Science

All Students87%
Female83%
Male92%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English86%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant87%

Writing

All Students85%
Female90%
Male80%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English86%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating
College readiness rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

23%
of schools in the state are Below average
52%
of schools in the state are Average
24%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Colorado. Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


College readiness rating 20133What's this?

College readiness rating combines this high school's graduation rates with data about college entrance exams, both of which are indicators of how well schools are preparing students for success in college and beyond.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

ACT participation

100%

Average ACT score

25

Graduation rate

90%


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

2 This rating is based on 2011-12 and 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in Math, English Language Arts, and Writing from the state of Colorado.

3 This rating is based on composite ACT scores from 2012-13 and four-year adjusted graduation rates from 2011-12. ACT participation represents the percentage of 11th graders taking the ACT. Because the ACT is mandated in Colorado high schools, ACT participation is NOT included in the GreatSchools rating.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 75% 56%
Hispanic 12% 32%
Two or more races 7% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 3%
Black 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 19%N/A41%
Male 48%N/A51%
Female 52%N/A49%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

College readiness and student pathways

Students typically attend these schools prior to attending this school District Schools
Home Schools
Other Charter and Private Schools
Percentage of students going to 4-year college 90% (2013)
Percentage of students going to the military 5% (2013)
Percentage of students going to vocational programs 5% (2013)
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
College counselor(s)
Computer specialist(s)
Dance teacher(s)
Math specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Nurse(s)
Reading specialist(s)
Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School psychologist
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by school staff French
German
Italian
Russian
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
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Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Engineering
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Technology
Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Science lab
Vocational or skills-based training offered
  • Auto mechanics
Clubs
  • Recycling club
  • Robotics club

Arts & music

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Arts (all)
  • Music
  • Performing arts
Staff resources available to students
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Jazz band
  • Orchestra
  • Theory
  • Vocal lessons / coaching
Clubs
  • Dance club: Swing, Salsa
  • Drama club
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Foreign languages
Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Greek
  • Latin
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Russian

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Gym
  • Kitchen

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Honors track
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • SAT/ACT prep classes
  • Summer college prep programs
  • Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School start time
  • 7:30 am
School end time
  • 3:00 am
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school: ends at 6:00 p.m.
School Leader's name
  • Derek Anderson
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Special schedule
  • Block scheduling
Is there an application process?
  • Yes

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Classical (e.g., focuses on the "classics")
  • College prep
  • Core knowledge
  • Honors track
  • Socratic seminars
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Arts (all)
  • Engineering
  • Foreign languages
  • Humanities
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Performing arts
  • Science
  • Technology
  • Writing
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Greek
  • Latin
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Vocational or skills-based training offered
  • Agriculture
  • Auto mechanics
  • Business management

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • College counselor(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Reading specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
  • School psychologist
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Russian
Extra learning resources offered
  • Career/college counseling
  • Counseling
  • Mentoring
  • Remediation
  • Supplemental Studies
  • Tutoring
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • SAT/ACT prep classes
  • Summer college prep programs
  • Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
Transportation options
  • Carpooling
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Audiovisual aids
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • College/career center
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Music room
  • Playground
  • Science lab
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Club and other sports
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Club and other sports
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • None
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Jazz band
  • Orchestra
  • Theory
  • Vocal lessons / coaching
Performing arts
  • None
Media arts
  • None

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Book/reading club
  • Boy scouts
  • Chess club
  • Cub scouts
  • Dance club: Swing, Salsa
  • Drama club
  • Girl scouts
  • Homework help/study buddy club
  • Mock trial competition club
  • Recycling club
  • Robotics club
  • Student council/government
  • Yearbook
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Coach sports teams or extracurricular activities
  • Monitor the playground
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?


1 out of 10students were accepted for the 2013-2014 school year.


Students accepted for the 2013-2014 school year
75
Applications received for the 2013-2014 school year
1050
Students typically come from these schools
District Schools
Home Schools
Other Charter and Private Schools

Planning ahead

College preparation / awareness offered
College prep programs/courses during the year
College presentations or information sessions
SAT/ACT prep classes
Summer college prep programs
Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
Students' post-graduation plans in 2013
4 year college - 90%
Military - 5%
Vocational - 5%
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1800 South Lemay Ave
Fort Collins, CO 80525
Website: Click here
Phone: (970) 494-4620

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