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GreatSchools Rating

Westfield Community School

Public | K-8 | 1571 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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Parent involvement

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34 reviews of this school


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Posted January 21, 2014

This school has horrendous bullying issues. Unless you play sports, you're looked down upon by fellow students and teachers. Teachers are bullies. I only spent the 8th grade in that school and I came to teachers AND a vice principal with bullying issues. They sided with the bully, literally! I dreaded even showing up to school. I missed at least 20 days in fear of being bullied and my grades dropped tremendously. I was in 8C. One time in particular a girl was bothering me at lunch, I told the staff who was also a teacher, he was aggravated at me for telling on her and put us both in the detention-like seats. If you don't want your kid to be brought into a threatened and uncomfortable environment, send him somewhere else and get OUT of this district!


Posted May 18, 2011

Horrible! The students there think they are so smart just because they are the "best" school in the district. I was about to send my son there but I sent him to CMS where he is having a great time. Compared to Lakewood,this school is just unfair.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2011

Have been in D300 since 1999, I have found that the elementary schools don't have a true problem with bullies. However, even though the district boasts of a "No tolerance" policy regarding dealing with bullying; I can testify that is not the case especially at the middle school and high school levels. It will be investigated upon reporting it - sometimes- depending on whom you talk to but overall it does not alleviate the problem. The child who is doing the bullying basically ends up getting away with it as the school admin does not do enough to prevent it. This has happened on more than one occasion and with different children I have had the privilege to know. It is better to be informed than be ignorant because when I heard that this district had this policy I was thrilled upon moving here. Having been here and experienced it I am not so thrilled. I think that they need to use in-school suspension for the repeat bully offenders and remand then to seek psychiatric evaluation when they don't stop it. I can see future headlines as one of these repeat offenders finally goes over the edge and really hurts or kills someone because they let it slide for too long.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 6, 2011

This school has the poorest communcation of any school that I have ever been involved with. You call for information and then when you follow through on the direction given, you find out that you were misinformed. I have had 2 students that have gone to this school and it gets worse every year. They are also terrible with notifying you when an accident occurs in dealing with your child. I would not recommend going to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2010

Since my children have started at Westfield they really enjoy going to school, the staff is great!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2010

Westfield puts students first! They participate in community initiatives throughout the year and really encourage student involvement. Our teachers are fantastic! Many have been with Westfield for 20 years & go above & beyond to not only educate, but to encourage students to be the best they can be!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2010

We are new to Westfield and have been pleasantly surprised at how helpful and friendly the staff and parents have been. My son also commented that the kids are really friendly and several have asked how he likes his new school so far. We have been extremely pleased.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2010

I love Westfield Community School because the students, faculty and families have great school spirit--From the principal down to the crossing guard.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

I love the teachers at Westfield. I have experience 6 teachers now and have absolutly loved each of them as have all my 3 children. They are really making a great impact on their little lives - thank you Westfield Teachers!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

I love Westfield, because it is not just a school, but a family to the students. We are blessed to have the most caring and dedicated teachers and Principle.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2010

Westfield Community School has the best middle school teachers!! They are learning champions!! They promote creativity and individualism!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 8, 2010

i thnk that the 6th graders on 6B have way too much home work. my child sits down after school and she stays there til about dinner time and sometimes after!! she also participates into activities outside of shcool and ends up getting missing assignments in her classes because she doesnt have time to finish it. she is also trying too finish it in the morning and on the bus. i really think that the students have way too much homework!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2010

I am attending WCS right now and I have to say it is a overall good school. The classrooms are not crowded and most of the teachers are nice. The teachers,for the most hand,are very patient and teach very well. They go into details to explain things when you are confused. They have many clubs and sports to play. However I do agree with how they grade gym (warning this is coming from a girl who cant shoot a basket to save her life) for pacers you are graded on how well you do and not how hard you try. I remember one of my teachers saying 'Even if you study hard for a test you still might fail' so gym is graded on how well you do which I disagree with because not everyone can run really fast and play a sport. Overall WCS is a good school
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 4, 2010

I have two children in elementary school at Westfield and have been generally very happy. The teachers and support staff have been very responsive and helpful. Administration is very approachable and involved. We see one or more of them at every school event. I have to agree with the other posters that if your child is an average/above average student, he/she will do very well here. If your child requires special services, you will need to be a strong advocate. Sadly, parent participation is not what it should be. There are a handful of parents that are very involved while the majority do very little if anything at all. I do not think this situation is unique to WCS but this school of 1800 students could offer some really great things if it had greater parental involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 23, 2009

'If you are a bright, shiny star, you'll be fine. Otherwise, be ready to be your child's only advocate. ' This was previously posted and I agree 100%. How this school rated an 8 out of 10 on this website I'll never understand.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2009

The 6th & 7th grade teachers aree not capable of teaching. I should of never took my daughter out of private school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2009

If you are a bright, shiny star, you'll be fine. Otherwise, be ready to be your child's only advocate.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 3, 2009

Most of teachers are great. Great sports program for a middle school. better than the high school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2009

I am currently a student at WCS and I have to say I have enjoyed the years I've been at this school but only for the memories not the teachers and staff.First of all, it seems the teachers don't enjoy their jobs or even care and some aren't the greatest at teaching. Also, teachers aren't gonna change a students mind if they threaten to write you up. Oh yeah we are so scared. It is hard to notice how clueless the teachers are because they never catch students text messaging during class and it's so ridiculos. What really makes me mad is when their is possibly a fight or people aren't doing what they're supposed to the teachers just stand there as if their waiting for a bus. How lovely. I also think some teachers pick on certain students more than others.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 3, 2008

the teachers treat the students very well, my son has been improving very well ever since he moved from Dundee middle school to Westfield!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
87%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students68%
Female58%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income30%
Non-low income74%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female91%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income80%
Non-low income86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities87%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students81%
Female88%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asian93%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White85%
Low income65%
Non-low income85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)90%
Students without disabilities79%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students79%
Female93%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asian79%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White85%
Low income71%
Non-low income82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)80%
Students without disabilities79%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students94%
Female95%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Low income75%
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)100%
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students76%
Female84%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White73%
Low income58%
Non-low income79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)27%
Students without disabilities84%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Female92%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White84%
Low income75%
Non-low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)27%
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students70%
Female73%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asian79%
Hispanic61%
Multiracial80%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Low income60%
Non-low income74%
Students with disabilities (IEP)23%
Students without disabilities77%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students69%
Female75%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asian84%
Hispanic52%
Multiracial87%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Low income52%
Non-low income74%
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities77%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female61%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asian85%
Hispanic39%
Multiracial42%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Low income49%
Non-low income65%
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities68%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female74%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asian95%
Hispanic55%
Multiracial58%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income61%
Non-low income75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)21%
Students without disabilities80%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students89%
Female88%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Hispanic74%
Multiracial75%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income84%
Non-low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)59%
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students64%
Female67%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asian71%
Hispanic39%
Multiracial60%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Low income52%
Non-low income69%
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students65%
Female66%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asian71%
Hispanic41%
Multiracial70%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Low income50%
Non-low income71%
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities71%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
State
1
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4
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7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 73% 51%
Hispanic 13% 24%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 8% 4%
Two or more races 4% 3%
Black 2% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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Sleepy Hollow Road
Algonquin, IL 60102
Phone: (847) 458-1900

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