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GreatSchools Rating

Central Park Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 761 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted August 4, 2014

Central park is an ok school for most part the principal Mrs. hamillton is great at maintaining the students there . I wish we get to go on more field trips more often and have more activities .it would be fun to leave the school for once and have a little break.the 8th graders only go on 1 trip a year and thats to six flags every year .for 8th grade trips you should try something more exciting like going to washington D.C and spending a night there or something we could have fundraisers to raise money The lunches are terrible i never eat them they are always undercooked and we have the same pizza dippers twice a week .We deserve a A.c in the prarie view gym because it get stuffy there and my friend almost had an asthma attack


Posted April 17, 2014

I have 2 children who attended. Love this school. The staff is very focused on the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2013

THIS SCHOOL IS INSANE!!!!!!!!!!! i hate this school. my daughter transferred from Disney last year shes in 5th grade. As and as soon as she started learning she started learning things she learned in 3rd grade. there are not a lot of extra-curricular activities and the teachers are low quality
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 26, 2012

My daughter has been in this school since Pre-K now going to 7th grade. She has consistently maintained all A's during these years. Since taking ISAT tests from 3rd grade on, her scores have always been in the top 10% "nationwide" compared to other students in the whole U.S. She loves this school so much that she's had perfect attendance for the last 3 years in a row. Mrs. Amraen is one of the best Principal's I have ever met. Her dedication to this school and its students is superb. My wife and I have learned to work in partnership with our daughter's teachers and so far it's been very beneficial to her. I would recommend Central Park to any parent who is willing to do his part in his child's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2011

I have two children at this school which started out reviving a great education, but as my older child hit middle school her grades were still the same but her test scores seemed to go down. I noticed that the younger more inexperienced teachers are far more interested in being friends with their students than actually teaching them. My fifth grader never came home with a homework assignment all year. During ISTAT'S her teacher even made them correct their mistakes . I reported this and nothing has been done. I will be removing my children as soon as possible!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2010

Because they always something for the children to do after school or even during school and i think it's a good place for our children to be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 9, 2010

My children have been part of this school for a few years know and they love it. they have helped with my children development . I am proud to say I have my baby entering this years kindergarten class and she cant wait. Mrs Amran by far has to be the best principle ever.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 9, 2009

One of my daugthers told me that there are some problems at this school. She said some of the teachers like more of the eigth graders than the 7th graders. That they treat the 8th graders more better then the 7th graders. And talking about the teachers said the 7th grade don't give them respect. But the teachers don't give them respect as the 8th graders. So i rate this school a two. Even the poor gyms, the school is sooo tiny, i hope they'll be more space provided in the future....
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2008

This school, I admit that it's a bad school. Well I teach my students in 7th and 8th how to behave, and teach them as well as I can so I'd give this school 3 stars.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 9, 2008

its disappointing to know that they are serving poor lunches and that there are 3 gyms and none of them are for lunchrooms,no half days,and no field trips.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2007

I feel very blessed to be a part of Central Park School. The motto is 'a place to belong' and it fits perfectly. We have an open friendly environment where truly everyone is welcome. We have put an end to cliques in the parent group. Our teachers are loving and nurturing, and our principal is truly amazing. 800 students and she knows everyone's name! We do spend a lot of time on the ISATS there is no option, and quite frankly our children need to be up to par in math, english and science. I don't see the dilemma. We are growing in extra-curricular activities, and our children are in a positive environment. If we could just get more parents to reinforce at home what are teachers and staff work so hard to achieve in the classroom, what a wonderful world it would be!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 8, 2007

I have 3 children enrolled in Central Park. i love the school for its parent-friendly atmosphere. The principal Ms. Amraen knows most parents and students on site because she is so involved personally with the families of all students. My children have maintained Honor Roll status and Central Park rewards these students greatly. Some teachers offer more of a challenge than others, but that is any school district. I love Ms. Jenkot in Pre-K, she and Mrs. Kmeic are so patient with kids and they always come up with the coolest crafts and activities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 20, 2007

I am not thrilled with this school, however I really don't have much choice (can't afford private school). I really don't feel like my son is getting a great education and it scares me that they are not preparing him for high school. I hate that they teach for the ISATs-my son learns nothing during the month of Feb./March because of it. There should be less focus on teaching just for that test. I don't think my son retains much of what is taught and I'm not sure he is being challenged enough-that comes when he gets home and works with me. It's the only way I feel like he is learning anything (when I go over it again with him). I wish things would improve at CP but maybe it's just not in the budget? As for extracurricular activities-I wish there were more but again maybe that's the funding.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 28, 2006

This school is very poor in every catagory. They waste 2 months of learning prep for the isats. My son was jumping threw new work so fast he didn't have time to retain any of what he learned. The school still did poor on the test. I took my son out of the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2006

I am pleased with the extras they offer, such as band and basketball, BUT I am dissappointed in the lack of challenging course work. My child hAs attended this school for 2 years and as sad as I am to admit it, he received a more challenging education from his previous school in Chicago that had overcrowding, lack of books and various other problems that plague inner city schools. I am now in the process of finding a new schools because I am concerned for his high school career. He is an honor student but has become lazy because the work or lack there of is not requiring much of him. For the past few weeks he has had no homework or crossword puzzles! This is disturbing to me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 9, 2006

My son and daughter have been going to Central Park for the last 2 years and I am a bit disappointed in the quality of their education. My daughter is in the 8th grade and never has homework. I questioned one of the teachers about this. She replied that some of the students would not do it therefore they would have to fail them. If her students failed she stated, this would look negatively on her teaching ability. Hence, this is why they don't give homework. That's not the answer I was looking for. Also my daughter is an exceptional student and was always in excelerated classes at her other schools. Central Park has a very poor excelerated program and no money to fund it. Don't get me wrong the teachers seem wonderful. I just feel that a lot of the kids are shortchanged. Tony
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 22, 2005

Central park school is a very parent friendly school. The staff is warm and welcoming. Teachers care about the students and their academic progress. Teachers compensate and make modifications so that every child in their class can learn.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted August 5, 2005

I feel central park is an ok school but they really don't know what to do for a special needs child. They try to put a square peg in a round hole with these kids and it's the school who needs to conform not the kids. They have no school nurse and no cpr/first aid certified people i learned this at a board meeting due to one parents complaints. Their parent group is run by a group of people who feel it is a status symbol and this is a popularity contest as opposed to doing what is best for the kids. The president is so busy delegating and taking credit for other peoples work and ideas that i don't even go anymore because it is just a waste of time what happened to the people who were running the last couple of years, they did better than this bunch.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2005

Central park school is one of great quality. My children have been in the school system over 9 years....The teachers are loving and compassionate people who bring their knowledge to the children with enthusiasm. The teachers and staff recognize all children not just children from their own classrooms which is a rarity in most schools today. All my children love school (well as much as children can love school.) And i attribute that to the teachers and principal of central park school. I have been involved not just as a parent of the 'average' child but also one with learning disabilities and without the support and guidance of my school and teachers i don't kjnow where she my be today. They were and still are a great asset to the success my child has achieved. When looking for a school choose central park in midlothian!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
63%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
52%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
66%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
61%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students21%
Female26%
Male15%
Black12%
Asiann/a
Hispanic23%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White36%
Low income19%
Not low income31%
Students with disabilities (IEP)20%
Students without disabilities21%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students32%
Female38%
Male24%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Low income29%
Not low income46%
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities36%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students51%
Female60%
Male39%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic47%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White57%
Low income49%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)33%
Students without disabilities54%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students53%
Female63%
Male42%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White52%
Low income51%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
Students without disabilities59%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students79%
Female81%
Male76%
Black80%
Asiann/a
Hispanic81%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White78%
Low income79%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)58%
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students44%
Female40%
Male49%
Black32%
Asiann/a
Hispanic42%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White82%
Low income43%
Not low income50%
Students with disabilities (IEP)23%
Students without disabilities48%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female51%
Male40%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White77%
Low income44%
Not low income50%
Students with disabilities (IEP)23%
Students without disabilities49%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students45%
Female48%
Male43%
Black31%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Low income40%
Not low income53%
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities49%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students47%
Female55%
Male41%
Black44%
Asiann/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Low income49%
Not low income44%
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities51%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students44%
Female46%
Male42%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Hispanic44%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White54%
Low income37%
Not low income58%
Students with disabilities (IEP)28%
Students without disabilities48%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students45%
Female56%
Male34%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanic45%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White50%
Low income39%
Not low income58%
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
Students without disabilities51%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students72%
Female76%
Male68%
Black68%
Asiann/a
Hispanic72%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income70%
Not low income76%
Students with disabilities (IEP)39%
Students without disabilities79%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students35%
Female33%
Male37%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanic37%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White47%
Low income33%
Not low income41%
Students with disabilities (IEP)35%
Students without disabilities35%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students38%
Female45%
Male31%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanic37%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Low income37%
Not low income41%
Students with disabilities (IEP)31%
Students without disabilities41%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Below average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
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Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 35% 24%
Black 34% 18%
White 29% 51%
Two or more races 2% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Computer specialist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Access to farm or natural area

Arts & music

Media arts
  • Computer animation

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to farm or natural area
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Mrs. Colandra Hamilton

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to farm or natural area
  • Auditorium
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball

Arts & music

Media arts
  • Computer animation
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Monitor the playground
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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3621 151st Street
Midlothian, IL 60445
Phone: (708) 385-0045

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