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GreatSchools Rating

Gray M Sanborn Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 597 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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8 reviews of this school


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Posted June 24, 2014

I was very disappointed throughout the one year our son spent here. One child in his class had severe behavioral disorder... we spoke with the teacher and later the principal after our son came home upset several times because he was punched, tripped, pushed into lockers, etc. by this child. Other kids were getting bullied as well. If a teacher witnessed, this child would get a minor. Over and over and over and over. We were continuously told "we're working on it". Clearly this "disciplinary" system was not effective... but it continued through the entire year. Why does my child and the others in his class have to deal with getting physically hurt and bullied while they "work on it"? Our son would tell us about the foul language and inappropriate references used by his classmates on a daily basis. Did I mention this was first grade? Some of this is to be expected... but still. I will say that my son's teacher was wonderful, and I believe she did all she could. The art teacher is fantastic as well. I believe that the administration at Sanborn is TRYING to improve things. Maybe someday they'll get there. But thankfully my son will not be there to find out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2014

Gray Sanborn... This school is awful on it's disciplinary policies and I think also the school is racist. There are some flaws in every public school system but something's that are done here appear to be vindictive. Teachers address issues with unnecessary aggression and condescending tones that really come off as idiotic more than informational. My daughter was the one of the kids left out of the mentoring program, where the students look after the younger students. The issue was not that there weren't any children to mentor because there were some mentors with 2 younger students, when you only allowed one. I thought that was appalling. With volunteering as well you are treated carelessly as if you are not giving your time to participate. I've went to introduce myself to the band teacher and the first thing she said to me is "make sure your daughter brings back her band instrument if you move". I hadn't confirmed that I was moving. Anyhow I have a gang of ordeals with this school and their policies. If there is an issue with minorities they should not make it so obvious. Keep it quiet. Sssssshhhhhh
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2013

Our family moved here from another state at the beginning of the school year. The staff and teachers at Sanborn really made my children feel very welcome. The school is constantly trying new things to improve the learning experience for the children. Absolutely no school is perfect anywhere but our family has been truly happy with the education that our children are receiving.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2013

This school is awful, if a student is well behave, follow rules and respectful then they are seen by their teacher as meek. Good student who are above average are not valued, students who bullies are not held accountable. Report bullying is a joke the assistance principle tells you will investigate the bullying then never follow up with the parent of the victim and refuse tell the parent what if any punishment was given to the bully. Also have witness a teacher behaving unprofessionally by screaming at students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2013

Academic program is weak for well-behaved students. Foul language and bullying is rampant. Little to nothing done to correct the behavior. Using the F* word is seen as a non-event and not worth calling attention to. Spanish speaking population is given more attention than English speaking. Shame. A few years back, District 15 was ranked as one of the top districts in Illinois. Not the case at this school. Teachers, even the better ones, have no qualms yelling at classes " you are the worst class I have ever had" on a daily basis. Again, in this environment, with a well-behaved child on the upper end of the learning curve and a quiet nature....this is not the place for such a student. Ask teachers how to challenge your well-behaved, well-studied child and you will be told not to rock the boat by the staff and administrator. You will scare them and seen as a threat simply because you want to challenge your child to learn more. They are more interested in keeping the peace with the troublemakers than they are in educating the students. You'd think it was a disciplinary center rather than an educational institution with the way they won't challenge students to learn more. Sad. Very sad
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 9, 2010

My son attended k-6th grades here. His k. teacher is one of the best teachers I've ever seen. The quality of his other teachers has been a mixed bag. The not-so-great ones lost their tempers with the kids, didn't handle discipline very effectively, etc. The band and orchestra programs are excellent, but the art and PE classes leave something to be desired due to the staff. The school offers opportunities for kids who are reading and doing math at above-grade levels to take classes a year ahead of their actual year in school, which challenged my son. There were some issues with the principal not taking the bullying of my son seriously, even tho' the school claims to have a "zero-tolerance policy". Without witnesses, children can get away with punching, kicking, and hitting other kids. Overall, the school is good, but the discipline issues were a black cloud over his education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2010

The diversity of Sanborn students brings a lively atmosphere. The wonderful teachers are caring and consistent in promoting high quality learning.


Posted May 8, 2008

My son is in fifth grade here, we were new to the district and during the first week he struggled with the new routine, teachers etc. However, his teacher, the school nurse and the assistant principal were all very involved with him and watching out for him, making sure that he was ok. After a week or two, he settled in very nicely, made friends and started to do very well. The school is a very diverse community and although there are kids that do not want to learn, the opportunities are there for those that do. The office staff are always warm and welcoming. I am very happy with this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
69%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students58%
Female54%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asian54%
Hispanic41%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income49%
Non-low income70%
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities66%
English language learners30%

Reading

All Students51%
Female55%
Male44%
Blackn/a
Asian54%
Hispanic28%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income37%
Non-low income70%
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities61%
English language learners20%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students54%
Female65%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic31%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White78%
Low income38%
Non-low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities61%
English language learners10%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students52%
Female62%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic28%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White78%
Low income38%
Non-low income86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities59%
English language learners5%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students68%
Female76%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White87%
Low income56%
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)30%
Students without disabilities75%
English language learners30%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students67%
Female62%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White97%
Low income46%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities68%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students58%
Female67%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White82%
Low income39%
Non-low income82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students60%
Female65%
Male56%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income41%
Non-low income82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students56%
Female62%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income41%
Non-low income73%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
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4
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8
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10

Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 42% 24%
White 38% 51%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 10% 4%
Black 9% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 3%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mrs. Sue Matkovic

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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101 North Oak Street
Palatine, IL 60067
Phone: (847) 963-7000

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