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GreatSchools Rating

Fox Meadow Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 788 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted January 26, 2014

The bully issues in this school are ridiculous. My sons teacher in first grade told him if he couldn't read the word then look at the picture. Needless to say I pulled my kid out of this school and have been paying for private school where he thrives!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2013

My daughter went to this school for six years and it was great. 2 teacher stood out as excellent , unfortunately the principal is horrible. Thank goodness she has left this year. My son goes their now and he is going into 5 th grade. He was in the split class and myself and my son were not fond of it. Hopefully this August the new principal will be friendly and approachable
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2011

My son attends Fox Meadow he really loves it!! People complain all of the time about u46 being an awful school district, but I really can't complain. We are involved parents who care about the education our son is receiving. So far it has been outstanding!! Thanks Fox Meadow
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 11, 2010

My son is happy at Fox Meadow and he continues to suprise me with all that he is learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2010

The education my son received was outstandning. He has so many great memories-thank you Fox Meadow!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2009

I have been overall satisfied with the education my daughter is getting at Fox Meadow. I am however disappointed in the behavior and responses by the principal to numerous situations. One of those directly involving my daughter. The education seems to be below average compared to other elementary schools in the district. I would like to see more creative and experiential learning in the classroom.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2007

My child has attended two other elementary schools, of which I feel FM is by far the worst. There really is no anti-bullying policy in effect. The extra curricular activities are poor, and do not appeal to a wide range of children. The teachers do a poor job of keeping the class in order. My child had 32 in the classroom at the beginning of the year, and now have a split class to make 25 now. The lack of real parental involvement at home with school work really shows in the classroom. Children could care less about grades. The teachers let other children grade papers, and my child has more wrong than should have been. It didn't matter to the teacher, and she left the grades the same. If more public schools are like this one, its no wonder our children are not suceeding as they mature.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2006

I loved their Kindergarten classes and teachers. My child's teacher has been a Kindergarten teacher for 21 years. Their PTO is great. The services they offer as far as social workers, occupational therapy, and speech therapy are incredible and the team work between the teachers and reat of the staff is great. They really put the kids above all else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2006

The school is overcrowded and overwhelmed with non-english speaking students. The academic programs are hindered by a generally poor attitude among the teachers. Children with special needs are intentionally ignored by the district which increased the critiria for special ed so that almost no child would qualify thru testing done by the school. Parents are on their own and discouraged by the school staff to get independant testing that would require the school to meet any special needs the child may have. Music, art, and other extracurricular activities are mediocer. The running program is good but only due to a personal intrest by one teacher. The football organization provides old helmets in poor/unsafe condition and frowned on parents providing new/safe helmets as those w/o safe helmets would feel bad about how they looked in the unsafe helmets. Parent volunteers are laking with only a few taking an interest in helping out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2005

Fox Meadow has a very active PTO, it's the teachers that aren't as involved as they could be. Since the new principal has arrived (2003) there is more student involvement. The ratios of classroom has improved significantly since the opening of Otter Creek Elementary- student enrollment has dropped and trailers are no longer needed. There is DARE and orchestra available to students 4th grade and above. PE, Art and Music are offered once weekly. SWAS programs are available. This is a diverse school that is still relatively new.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 28, 2004

My daughter attened this school for first, second, and third grade. She loved it, but towards third grade she began to hate school. Kids made fun of her, the teachers didn't care, she was in those mobile rooms as a classroom, and the school was getting too big. And as I was looking at how many students there are per teacher, there's more than at her highschool right now. This school seems to be too big and that means there is less one on one action between the children and students and less concentration for the children.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students57%
Female57%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asian42%
Hispanic29%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Low income41%
Non-low income62%
Students with disabilities (IEP)33%
Students without disabilities60%
English language learners15%

Reading

All Students62%
Female73%
Male51%
Blackn/a
Asian46%
Hispanic36%
Multiracial70%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low income48%
Non-low income66%
Students with disabilities (IEP)36%
Students without disabilities66%
English language learners14%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students72%
Female81%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic72%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White79%
Low income63%
Non-low income75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)25%
Students without disabilities78%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female66%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White69%
Low income48%
Non-low income64%
Students with disabilities (IEP)25%
Students without disabilities64%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students80%
Female88%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic76%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White83%
Low income74%
Non-low income82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)33%
Students without disabilities86%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students79%
Female78%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asian92%
Hispanic73%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White84%
Low income65%
Non-low income85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)25%
Students without disabilities86%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students70%
Female77%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asian83%
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White75%
Low income52%
Non-low income77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
Students without disabilities76%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students80%
Female84%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian90%
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income66%
Non-low income85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students77%
Female84%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asian90%
Hispanic68%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low income66%
Non-low income82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 58% 51%
Hispanic 24% 23%
Asian 9% 4%
Black 4% 18%
Two or more races 4% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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1275 Jenna Drive
South Elgin, IL 60177
Phone: (847) 888-7182

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