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GreatSchools Rating

Nevada Virtual Academy

Charter | K-12 | 4500 students

Best known for our individualized learning plans and award winning curriculum.

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 6 ratings
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
Based on 13 ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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51 reviews of this school


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Posted April 20, 2014

This school is not good. There was a bullying incident where the Staff and Faculty did nothing about it. THERE ARE A LOT OF DRUGS THERE!!If you do not want your child to become involved with the wrong crowd and hate bullying, I do not recommend sending your child there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2014

The Nevada Virtual Academy is currently attempting to phase out their Foundations courses that are taught by special education teachers for special needs students, who need extra support. The school is becoming extremely academic focused and is losing sight of the fact that these heightened expectations, while beneficial in the long run must be effectively and smoothly transitioned to students. There are a number of very effective measures that have been instituted, including but not limited to face to face tutoring and more CRT/HSPE preparation available in live tutoring setting and virtual. It is my impression from working with Nevada Virtual Academy, that despite taking full federal and state grant funded programs that its administration and school board are very private in their practices. It is my belief that a public charter school should be open to public board meetings, where parents and teachers are invited monthly. One of the challenges that many failing students will face next year is the inability to return. It is with great hope that these students who view Nevada Virtual Academy as their best chance of graduation are seen as much more than just a number.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 15, 2014

This used to be my daughter's school. We were satisfied and even encouraged another student to join. Now I regret recommending the school. I am a math teacher tutoring this friend's daughter and NVVA changed the math curriculum at mid-year with no explanation or support. This student went from an A in prealgebra to an F. And I can see why. The Edgenuity videos are tedious and boring. And they don't adequately explain what she sees on tests and quizzes. And the teachers are struggling too. NVVA's response is they are stuck with it for the rest of this semester. So they are willing to toss out this student's past success for a bad contract and program! I am disgusted and will be telling everyone I know about these issues! If you want your prealgebra student to learn then do NOT sign up for NVVA or Edgenuity!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2014

Totally agree with this parent's review: "Terrible teachers not supportive or organized dishonest practices administration not reliable also rude as also staff over low budget mentality mixed with unprofessional mannerisms " Submitted by a parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2014

Terrible teachers not supportive or organized dishonest practices administration not reliable also rude as also staff over low budget mentality mixed with unprofessional mannerisms
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2014

terrible teachers dishonest practices administration clearly out of loop rude and uninterested in solving issues Unqualied staff not a accredited school petty attitudes mixed with a low quality mannerisms No virtual lessons
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 28, 2013

Love this school! The middle school special Ed teachers a great. Real caring! My child is a few years behind but I love he gets time with just his teacher and his classes are at his level. He felt stupid in regular school here his teacher works with him and a few other kids! She always responds to our questions!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2013

My school is amazing I thought it would be super hard to leave public school but this is the best. I have enjoyed it doing my classes ,going on field trips regularly, doing live class connect sessions with my whole class and teacher!!! It is all so much fun and there's are contest mobile app contest it's super fun to do it all! I am so glad I chose online school and Nevada Virtual Academy in general! Thank you to whoever thought about online school thank you soooo much!!! And thanks to most Mrs.Albrecht and my learning coach... I'm loving the 5th grade!!!


Posted October 17, 2013

The entire reason we went for this curriculum with our son is because we needed flexibility. Our son is 5. We knew homeschooling him would limit his social activities but I was going to take him for story time at our library each Wednesday and field trips with the homeschool group on base. I can't do that because of these class connect sessions. They are pointless and time consuming. There is no flexibility to this program. The class connect sessions are during most days of the week, they are required. If I'm teaching him the school curriculum for 4-6 hours a day, I can see no reason why we should have to sit down and do these class connect sessions, especially when they interfere with our days. He's five years old, at regular public schools they spend 2.5 hours there, they get social time and then they spend an hour on homework. He spends 6 hours a day doing work and gets no social time during the week. Also, the math is all over the place. Most days it's shapes, which he's an expert on but on other days it's "count to 100 by tens." I hate this program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2013

I love this school. I have three kids attending two girls in 7th. and 10th. and one boy in 12th. this year. I love the way it is structured, it keeps you on your toes. It is just like being at a brick and mortar school, but at home. The teachers work with the parents/learning coaches to help your children. This is our third year with NVVA. I am so glad we chose this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2013

We have two daughters, 3rd and 7th with NVVA in our 6th year now in Reno, NV. WOW! Though there have been bumps in the road, after a 2 year learning curve the system is really manageable. K12 curriculum is top shelf nationwide. After many changes over the years, our admin staff bends over backward for the family that appreciates spending quality time with their children. Being actively involved with their education is mandatory and financially challenging, but very worth it. It is homeschooling with tech support, teacher support and legislative support, as well. This is public school with the parents in control!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2013

Don't believe the good reviews on here..they were obviously written by the staff of NVVA..what a joke..save the frustration and waste of time..this place is a joke..buy the K12 paket yourself..you'll get better results without all the frustration..rude staff and nonsense this company seems mired in..
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2013

The thought of a tailored education plan excited us. After my 4th grade son placed at a 7th grade level in his placement test I thought he would be challenged accordingly. This was not the case, he was asked to do rounding and estimating along with place value as the rest of the kids... He proved he understands algebra at middle school level but they did nothing to enhance his gift of math. Then they tell you that you can just test and skip, but if you skip then you cannot push a grade forward because you did not do 100% of the work. So even if he does test out, he won't have a math course until the rest of the subjects are 100%. We liked the thought of creating our own schedule, that is not possible, I actually had a teacher ask me NOT to log attendance if we study on a weekend and not to log attendance if we attend the 2-3 hours of virtual classes offered... So if my kid is attending a class being given by an actual teacher then the attendance does not count? I could only figure this is because they want us to lie about hours spent learning, just to make the school look better. If they can't get it done in time then something is broken, fix it, don't ask the parents to lie.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 19, 2012

I have two children enrolled at this school. One in elementary and one in high school. When people ask us about this school, we tell them they should try another distance education school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2012

This school was a perfect fit for our family. We enrolled my gifted son halfway thru the school year in his 2nd grade. They were able to cater his work load to fit his needs and we eliminated the boredom in the classroom. We were blown away by the classroom materials we received. All textbooks, workbooks, math manipulatives, science aids, etc were included in the program - even a computer and printer! We have been able to adjust his schedule and that gives us flexibility. If he wants to keep working on a subject, we can alter the schedule to work for us, however, if we wanted to go by the classroom plan provided by k12, that works also. Everyone that we've met has been wonderful to work with and eager to help us out if needed. We are enrolling our younger son in the k12 kindergarten program this fall. My measure of success is hearing my son thank me over and over again for enrolling him in home school. This program is a huge success for our family and we can't wait until next school year!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2012

When I decided to pull my three children from the public school system and HOMESCHOOL them, I did my research and chose K12 as the curriculum that was the best. I found out that Nevada offers it for FREE through NVVA! Perfect! This is homeschooling with a teacher to access when questions arise and field trips for all grades, but you are teaching them and it is a full time job. Starting at the beginning of the school year is a must. Starting mid-year is extremely difficult and I don't reccommend it. The name of the school having the word "virtual" in it seems to have deceived some in that they expect the computer to do all the teaching. That is not the case. A lot of their subjects are online, but there is a lot of work offline that requires parental assistance. Choosing to pull them from a brick and mortar school requires you, the parent, to do the teaching, not a computer. If kids could teach themselves there wouldn't be any teachers needed. There are problems with all curriculums out there, but this one is by far the most complete!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2012

My son is in 1st grade and just started Nevada Virtual Academy about 2 months ago. So far it has been great for him. He has loved to learn again after falling behind in public school. The only thing is since we started towards the end of the year we are trying to play catch-up so I think next year will be better. The cirriculum is awesome, he loves all the activities we do. The only thing I don't like is sometimes there is too much reading for a first grader, I think more interacting stuff on the computer would keep him more interested like with history. Sometimes there are 5-6 pages I have to read on the screen to him and he is just not interested. They did provide almost everything he needed and I love the flexibility of the program and how we know exactly what to do everyday and if we want to work ahead we can. This would not work for someone working, I am staying home to teach my son and it is a full time job, it takes about 5-6 hours a day but I like it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2012

NVVA is a good option for my son. It's not perfect but the regular schools here in Vegas are far worse. WARNING: there are not virtual lessons and if you join after the beginning of the school year you pick up your classes from the beginning again. WORK: there aren't virtual lessons, you're on your own SOCIAL: plan on doing your own field trips. There have not been ANY we have been able to get into yet w/ NVVA. and there is no way to communicate with other parents and students as much as they will tell you there is...there is not.Even on the recommended sites the other parents are saying just that. The boards are impossible to negotiate. NVVA may be for you IF you have the time and ability. It is NOT for you if you are looking for someone to "teach" your child via a computer while you work. You will have to be their teacher 5 hours a day and then some.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 14, 2012

I placed both my boys in this academy . They are on track and doing excellent. EXCELLENT SCHOOL I have been with school 3 years
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 13, 2012

We have been with NVVA for a nearly 3 months now. When looking into this school, I put both my kids (11th grade & 6th grade) into the car & we went over to the main office to say hello and check it out. We showed up the day of a book fair, which was nice. Having attained the majority of my college education online I truly thought I was prepared to do this. The school sent many textbooks and the instructions are to the letter, but we almost gave up in the first two weeks. We choose to give it some time and in about a week my 11th grader was in sync & liked it. My 6th grader..well we are unsure what we will do. She is doing well academically but she needs the social factor..which has become more evident the last few months. Teachers are not baby sitters. Educating your child is not easy, and I don't think it should be easy. It takes a great deal of time and patience to do what is best for our kids. Yes this program is difficult, it is a bit complicated to learn, but overall your child's education depends on what your child & you make of it together. I would recommend NVVA for those who have much patience & a desire to teach..not just supervise...your child.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2013.

163 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
49%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

163 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2013.

226 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
39%

2010

 
 
51%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 71% in 2013.

224 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 69% in 2013.

239 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
42%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

240 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
38%
Science

The state average for Science was 61% in 2013.

240 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
46%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 44% in 2011.

186 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
26%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 49% in 2013.

353 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 63% in 2013.

352 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

465 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
45%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 62% in 2013.

461 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

517 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
15%

2012

 
 
32%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
32%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 50% in 2013.

518 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
56%
Science

The state average for Science was 54% in 2013.

514 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
33%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 60% in 2011.

428 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
45%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

All Students53%
Female49%
Male56%
Black/African American38%
Asiann/a
Hispanic57%
Multiracialn/a
White/Caucasian55%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch44%
Full price61%
Students with disabilities (IEP)38%
Students without disabilities56%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English54%
Not migrant53%

Reading

All Students47%
Female48%
Male46%
Black/African American33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic43%
Multiracialn/a
White/Caucasian51%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch39%
Full price52%
Students with disabilities (IEP)33%
Students without disabilities49%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Not migrant47%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Nevada Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

All Students60%
Female58%
Male61%
Black/African American32%
Asiann/a
Hispanic65%
Multiracialn/a
White/Caucasian61%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch52%
Full price64%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English59%
Not migrant60%

Reading

All Students63%
Female66%
Male59%
Black/African American52%
Asiann/a
Hispanic65%
Multiracialn/a
White/Caucasian63%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch53%
Full price68%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities66%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Not migrant63%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Nevada Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

All Students48%
Female44%
Male51%
Black/African American29%
Asiann/a
Hispanic46%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White/Caucasian52%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch36%
Full price57%
Students with disabilities (IEP)29%
Students without disabilities50%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English48%
Not migrant48%

Reading

All Students56%
Female57%
Male54%
Black/African American40%
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White/Caucasian58%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch51%
Full price59%
Students with disabilities (IEP)25%
Students without disabilities59%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English56%
Not migrant56%

Science

All Students55%
Female53%
Male57%
Black/African American34%
Asiann/a
Hispanic45%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White/Caucasian61%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch44%
Full price64%
Students with disabilities (IEP)32%
Students without disabilities58%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English56%
Not migrant55%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Nevada Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

All Students37%
Female36%
Male38%
Black/African American17%
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian43%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch27%
Full price45%
Students with disabilities (IEP)12%
Students without disabilities41%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English37%
Not migrant37%

Reading

All Students54%
Female60%
Male49%
Black/African American30%
Asiann/a
Hispanic52%
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian60%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch45%
Full price61%
Students with disabilities (IEP)21%
Students without disabilities59%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English55%
Not migrant54%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Nevada Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

All Students35%
Female37%
Male34%
Black/African American20%
Asiann/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian40%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch28%
Full price41%
Students with disabilities (IEP)11%
Students without disabilities38%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English35%
Not migrant35%

Reading

All Students53%
Female62%
Male45%
Black/African American35%
Asiann/a
Hispanic48%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian58%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch46%
Full price58%
Students with disabilities (IEP)19%
Students without disabilities57%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English53%
Not migrant53%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Nevada Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

All Students15%
Female18%
Male12%
Black/African American8%
Asiann/a
Hispanic7%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian18%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch9%
Full price20%
Students with disabilities (IEP)4%
Students without disabilities16%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English15%
Not migrant15%

Reading

All Students35%
Female43%
Male27%
Black/African American18%
Asiann/a
Hispanic31%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian38%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch32%
Full price38%
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities38%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English35%
Not migrant35%

Science

All Students36%
Female38%
Male34%
Black/African American10%
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian42%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch29%
Full price42%
Students with disabilities (IEP)19%
Students without disabilities38%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English37%
Not migrant36%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the Criterion Referenced Test (CRT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 5 and 8 in science. The CRT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Nevada Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 76% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
39%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
93%
Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
36%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 80% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
63%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the High School Proficiency Examination (HSPE) to assess high school students in reading, writing, math and science. The HSPE is a high school graduation requirement. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Math

All Students85%
Female83%
Male65%
Black/African American50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic66%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian93%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch56%
Full price86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)27%
Students without disabilities85%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English85%
Not migrant85%

Reading

All Students93%
Female93%
Male68%
Black/African American58%
Asiann/a
Hispanic77%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian93%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch69%
Full price91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)30%
Students without disabilities93%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English93%
Not migrant93%

Science

All Students86%
Female83%
Male59%
Black/African American28%
Asiann/a
Hispanic49%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian95%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch49%
Full price88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)28%
Students without disabilities86%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English86%
Not migrant86%

Writing

All Students92%
Female91%
Male64%
Black/African American67%
Asiann/a
Hispanic73%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White/Caucasian98%
Students qualifying for free/reduced lunch67%
Full price90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)21%
Students without disabilities92%
Students with limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English92%
Not migrant92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Nevada used the High School Proficiency Examination (HSPE) to assess high school students in reading, writing, math and science. The HSPE is a high school graduation requirement. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Nevada. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Nevada Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Nevada Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 68% 37%
Black 12% 10%
Hispanic 12% 40%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 4% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 2% 1%
Two or more races 0% 5%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 0%N/A54%
Male 48%N/A51%
Female 52%N/A49%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

College readiness and student pathways

Students typically attend these schools prior to attending this school Brick and Mortar Public School
Colleges most students attend after graduation University of Nevada Las Vegas
University of Nevada Reno
College of Southern Nevada
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Photography
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
Media arts
  • Computer animation
Clubs
  • Student newspaper

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Latin
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Advanced placement courses
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College Preparedness Month Nov
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • School-sponsored trips to college campuses
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mike Kazek
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Special schedule
  • Part-time study
Is there an application process?
  • Yes

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Advanced placement courses
  • K12 curriculum
  • Virtual school
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Latin
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
  • Mentoring
  • Resource classes
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College Preparedness Month Nov
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • School-sponsored trips to college campuses
Transportation options
  • None
School facilities
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • None
Girls sports
  • None

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Photography
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
Media arts
  • Computer animation

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Lego club
  • Service club
  • Student council/government
  • Student newspaper
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Neither uniforms nor dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Booster club
  • Chaperone school trips
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

This school accepts applications on a

rolling basis

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?

Students typically come from these schools
Brick and Mortar Public School

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
University of Nevada Las Vegas
University of Nevada Reno
College of Southern Nevada
College preparation / awareness offered
College presentations or information sessions
School-sponsored trips to college campuses
College Preparedness Month Nov
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

8965 S. Eastern Avenue
Ste 330
Las Vegas, NV 89123
Website: Click here
Phone: (877) 900-5602

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