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Midland Park High School

Public | 7-12 & ungraded | 515 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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16 reviews of this school


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Posted August 18, 2014

Because the school is small, there is a great deal of flexibility. Underclassmen can take courses far earlier in their educational careers than elsewhere. The small class size means that educators and administrators really know their students and have time for them. Relationships built with teachers are deeper, longer and more meaningful here. Kids have the opportunity to test the waters by participating in multiple activities. It is not unusual for a kid to vein in the band performing at halftime and then running onto the field to play football, as well. There is a strong sense of community, too --people here look out for one another's children and parents are very involved in the PTAs and Education Foundation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 29, 2014

I graduated Midland Park high school in 1991. We had about 100 kids in our graduating class, including students from HoHoKus and the hearing impared program. The class size enabled a closeness that still exists today. It was very inclusive, allowing friendships to develop among all grades. Today, graduates' children attend school together.


Posted February 27, 2014

Small town mentality=small school offerings. Having had my kids go to the jr high part of this school then transferring to private high schools (like 25% of all graduating 8th grade classes here, that says something in itself) because of the very limited sports, AP and honors classes, activities and clubs. People who fight regionalization are hurting no one but the kids who live in a "bubble". Since MPHS already has a co-op program in place for football, wrestling and cheering they have to recognize at some level the small school environment simply doesn't work. The kids have to suffer from some sort of identity crisis when you have to play for and cheer for the neighboring town's school. The kids that attend Here who keeps in touch with mine are limited in forming new friendships as well. The cliques are formed in grammar school and no one goes outside those boundaries for any reason. The bullies, populars, jocks, etc. remain in tact and that is what you deal with for 6 years here. REGIONALIZE people is the way to go to offer the KIDS the best opportunities to develop academically, socially and athletically. Not Doing so only hurts them, no one else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2013

Academically, the school is on the upswing. There has been a change in administration and additions made to teaching staff. Performance and enrollment in AP courses has risen considerably. SATs are up and the latest essay scores show how well-prepared the kids are in writing. Mathematics has been a weak spot in the past but has improved considerably. Because of its small size, students here have opportunities to participate in sports, drama, music, broadcasting, etc., that they might be shut out of elsewhere. Teachers and administrators are extremely accessible and responsive to parents and students, open to being creative with course of instruction at all levels. Active PTA, Boosters, etc. Facilities are dated and need improvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2013

A parent All 3 schools share one common thread.. Caring teachers and Administrators that take the time to know each and every child by name and work with their strengths and weaknesses. There are ample extra curricular activities offered .Very little offered in the way of the arts and languages.Sadly , the community is not progressive and does not value academia as much as neighboring towns. As a result , budgets include very little extra that would enhance educational offerings . The buildings are old and need extensive repairs . Not uncommon to find leaking ceilings. The teachers do the very best they can with what they have, but need more monetary support to become more technologically and academically up to date . There is a lot of potential here .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2013

A public school with the advantages of a private school. Caring teachers and administrators, as well as involved parents. I have had 4 children graduate from Midland Park HIgh School and go on to college, graduate school, and careers. They were extremely well-prepared, especially in writing and Math. One HS English teacher even reached out to them for feedback on their freshman year of college English to insure she was preparing them adequately. I think the easy accessibility of the teachers which came with a small school translated to college, where my kids did not hesitate to approach professors or advisors directly with their concerns. My kids also participated in a lot more activities than they would have had the opportunity to do at a larger school. Coaches and advisors often accommodated each other's schedules because they knew that their programs were "sharing" the same participants.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 25, 2013

There are advantages and disadvantages to both large and small HS's but MPHS is a clear example of what's good within a small school environment. For the most part the teachers are very good but they could work a little harder compared to other districts. The comment about regionalization is based on ignorance....you really need to find out what's involved and frankly, the surrounding districts aren't interested. It can't be done unilaterally.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2013

Although the high school is small, it has so much to offer. My child has had wonderful, caring, and highly motivated teachers. The teachers and administration are interested in the success of every child. The school has increased its offering of AP courses, has honors classes and many extra-curricular activities. Students in MPHS are not just numbers. They are students that receive individual attention in this small and nurturing environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2013

Private school attention in a public school. All the teachers/administrators know all the kids, whether they've had them in class or not. Makes for a great, supportive environment. Many honors and AP classes are offered, and kids can participate in more than one extracurricular at a time, and the coaches/advisors help them work around time conflicts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2013

Small school with all the benefits of a larger one. MPHS gives kids a great environment to excel, including honor/AP courses, National Honor Society. etc. Your kid does not get lost, but instead can form great relationships with teachers/students. Best Marching Band program around!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 29, 2012

I personal go to this school. Sadly I find no joy in it. I am saying this as a student who loves to learn and wants to succeed. They are almost giving out As. Its not fun to do something with no challenge. The school itself is unsafe. Everywhere you look, you see the need for repairs. Though, I know the administration is trying hard their efforts are useless.


Posted April 19, 2010

Small school but offers lots of honor classes, clubs, sports, art etc. Everyone knows everyone. Great teachers
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2010

My two daughters' experience was comparable to a private school: small classes, individual attention, rigorous coursework. Both have excelled in college, particularly in writing skills; 4's and 5's on AP tests. Principal is 'no-nonsense' - runs a tight ship, but is open and caring. One weak spot-Spanish program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2008

The teachers and admin staff pay no atention until it is too late. And only repond to save there own ass... Its terrible to be a kid in high school these days. Is there anyone who cares anymore?.......
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2008

Safety is poor, teaching is fair, academics are fair, kids are brats, system overall is poor
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2007

Unfortunately, the high school is the worst out of the three. the math department is atrocious. Math is one of the most important classes that need understanding and this school does not offer a great department. Yes, the school won many awards, but those awards were received over 7 years ago and a lot has changed. According to my son, though, the food is great! All extracurricular activities are ample in fun and knowledge. They also have a very disappointing track made of gravel. People are injured there and when the gravel slides, it slows people in track meets down. Overall, I give this school three stars because it has the potential to be changed.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Language Arts Literacy

The state average for Language Arts Literacy was 65% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
77%
Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Jersey used the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJ ASK) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in language arts literacy and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in science. The NJ ASK is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Jersey. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: New Jersey Department of Education

Language Arts Literacy

The state average for Language Arts Literacy was 82% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
94%
Math

The state average for Math was 69% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Jersey used the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJ ASK) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in language arts literacy and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in science. The NJ ASK is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Jersey. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: New Jersey Department of Education

Language Arts Literacy

All Students80%
Female86%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
White81%
Other ethnicityn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Special educationn/a
General education89%
English language learnersn/a
Not migrant80%
Limited English Proficient Current Plus Formern/a
Limited English Proficient Formern/a

Math

All Students72%
Female82%
Male59%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
White74%
Other ethnicityn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Special educationn/a
General education77%
English language learnersn/a
Not migrant72%
Limited English Proficient Current Plus Formern/a
Limited English Proficient Formern/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Jersey used the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJ ASK) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in language arts literacy and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in science. The NJ ASK is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Jersey. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

The different student groups are identified by the New Jersey Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Jersey Department of Education

Language Arts Literacy

All Students94%
Female95%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Other ethnicityn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Special education58%
General education99%
English language learnersn/a
Not migrant94%
Limited English Proficient Current Plus Formern/a
Limited English Proficient Formern/a

Math

All Students81%
Female79%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Other ethnicityn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Special education25%
General education89%
English language learnersn/a
Not migrant81%
Limited English Proficient Current Plus Formern/a
Limited English Proficient Formern/a

Science

All Students90%
Female88%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Other ethnicityn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Special education58%
General education94%
English language learnersn/a
Not migrant90%
Limited English Proficient Current Plus Formern/a
Limited English Proficient Formern/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Jersey used the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJ ASK) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in language arts literacy and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in science. The NJ ASK is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Jersey. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

The different student groups are identified by the New Jersey Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Jersey Department of Education

Language Arts Literacy

The state average for Language Arts Literacy was 92% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
96%
Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Jersey used the High School Proficiency Assessment (HSPA) to test students in grade 11 in language arts literacy and math. The HSPA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Jersey. Students are required to pass the HSPA in order to graduate. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: New Jersey Department of Education

Language Arts Literacy

All Students96%
Female94%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Other ethnicityn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Special educationn/a
General education98%
English language learnersn/a
Not migrant96%
Limited English Proficient Current Plus Formern/a
Limited English Proficient Formern/a

Math

All Students91%
Female88%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Other ethnicityn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Special educationn/a
General education97%
English language learnersn/a
Not migrant91%
Limited English Proficient Current Plus Formern/a
Limited English Proficient Formern/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Jersey used the High School Proficiency Assessment (HSPA) to test students in grade 11 in language arts literacy and math. The HSPA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Jersey. Students are required to pass the HSPA in order to graduate. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

The different student groups are identified by the New Jersey Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Jersey Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 58% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
66%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Jersey used the New Jersey Biology Competency Test (NJBCT) to assess students in Biology. The New Jersey Biology Competency Test (NJBCT) is standards-based, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Jersey. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

Source: New Jersey Department of Education

Biology I

All Students75%
Female82%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Other ethnicityn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Special education36%
General education82%
English language learnersn/a
Not migrant75%
Limited English Proficient Current Plus Formern/a
Limited English Proficient Formern/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Jersey used the New Jersey Biology Competency Test (NJBCT) to assess students in Biology. The New Jersey Biology Competency Test (NJBCT) is standards-based, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Jersey. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Jersey Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Jersey Department of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating
College readiness rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

25%
of schools in the state are Below average
48%
of schools in the state are Average
26%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


College readiness rating 20133What's this?

College readiness rating combines this high school's graduation rates with data about college entrance exams, both of which are indicators of how well schools are preparing students for success in college and beyond.

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District
State
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SAT participation

83%

SAT college ready

49%

Graduation rate

93%


1 This rating is based on 2012-13 NJ ASK, HSPA, and/or NJBCT results from the New Jersey Department of Education.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in math and reading from from the New Jersey Department of Education.

3 This rating is based on composite SAT scores, ACT/SAT participation, and four-year adjusted graduation rates from 2012-13.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 86% 51%
Hispanic 7% 22%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 9%
Black 2% 16%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 2%N/A34%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Nicholas Capuano

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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250 Prospect St
Midland Park, NJ 07432
Phone: (201) 444-7400

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