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GreatSchools Rating

Cherry Valley Springfield Central School

Public | PK-12 | 542 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

2 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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9 reviews of this school


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Posted June 12, 2014

This school is the worst when it comes to communication and returning phone calls and forget if your child somehow has a possible seizure you wouldn't be notified and i talked with another parent this happened to. Forget about equality and treating students as if they have a voice. Also don't plan on having any broken windows that are not fixed that day or the very next as this school is known for dialing CPS for every small reason you could imagine. Lets also mention certain workers are favored and monopolize most school activities so that their children can win everything. This school in small minded and feels it is superior to it's parents and has quite the reputation for misconduct. They claim that they are there for the children .... If that's the case you treat them fairly and realize they are equals as well. This school in my opinion and some parents i know is by far the worst when it comes to being professional.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2014

CVS-CS was great for elementary school. Once I was in middle school and high school though, a lot changed. I was 14 years old and in gym class with 18 year old guys, and many found this inappropriate (dodgeball was nearly dangerous, and I would choose not to participate). In addition, the school is very sports-focused. This is kind of silly, considering that most graduates do not even receive sports scholarships for college (or are even able to make the college teams). During the academic day, there have been a few dangerous incidents, a few fist-fights, etc., but nothing too out of the norm for a public high school. If a student is not self-motivated to learn, it will be very difficult to find educational inspiration. Gifted students will eventually become bored. This school does a good job of creating meaningful relationships, however, even if the number of those relationships are small. The guidance counselor is fantastic but I'm not sure if he still works there. Some teachers are very open about their personal lives, which may be good or not, depending on how informal/formal one wants their education to be. I give the school 3 stars because it is pretty average.


Posted January 6, 2014

In the last five years the school has put a lot of effort into improving and it really shows. In my time there, I saw as teachers, facilities, and staff all greatly improved. My rating would have probably only been three stars if it wasn't for the excellent guidance, and a couple of really outstanding teachers that help you feel at home.


Posted December 17, 2013

This school has rebuilt as a structure, developed improved many of its personnel within the last 3 years. They have made & a huge improvement, in my mind. All it's students graduated the last 2 years in a row. Most personal of today are personally devoted and have the heart & motivation in right place. More improvement is always in place. Hopefully with right parent involvement, as well as push for better support from government - this will continue to be a great peaceful place to start out, & build for a future. I would give it 5 stars for all positive changes, but reserve myself to 4 since, as said - there is room for more improvements. My teenager, (previous high school student in cherry Valley), is successfully off to college by now & is competing well with other students, both from USA & international countries. He & his friends, (who all are off to different higher education), still talks about their special teachers with huge respect & gratitude, and of course, the famous guidance personal, especially - Mr. Hage. Visit & give them a try! This area is beautiful & friendly, a great place to start a family. My best to you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 11, 2013

This is my son's 3rd year at CV-S, and by far the worst. I have made many phone calls and left numerous messages in regards to my son and bullying and not one phone call in return. His first year was fine, he had an older teacher who was old school. Didn't have a problem. Last year he had a brand new teacher (teacher's first year teaching) and they promised to have someone come from high school to help my son with his organization, which lasted apparently two days when the high schooler never showed back up. I wasn't informed until the end if year Parent Teacher Conference. They do NOT like the parents to get invovled or know what is going on. My son would come home every day complaining of what the kids would say to him and when I brought it to Ms. Crisman's attention she brushed it off as the childhood game "yo mama" jokes. Now this year I can;t get one teacher (he is "middle school" 6th grade now) to return my call in regards to either he school work or the fact he is being bullied. DO NOT SEND YOUR KIDS HERE.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 24, 2012

Teachers don't get along and argue in front of students.Lots of tension between Administration and staff who talk about each other in front of students.We pulled our kids out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 12, 2012

The quality of education at CV-S has gone down considerably over the years. The discipline is non-existent, teachers are bullied by other teachers and the administration, the teacher's union has been called an "anomaly" because they are so powerful. The student's test scores are lower than all other schools in the area. The reading program used to be good, but they have screwed it up in the last couple of years so now it stinks, along with the elementary math program. The 6th grade has been moved out of the elementary and they have created a "middle school", but in name only. The experience was horrendous for this year's 6th graders - only allowed to watch, but not participate, in middle school activities, and not allowed to participate in elementary activities anymore, either. They have also messed up the 6th grade Safety Patrol program by taking it away from someone with years of experience and forcing it upon 2 people who are inexperienced and don't want to be doing it. The administration does not support special ed. students -check out how many law suits have been filed recently! We are pulling out children out and sending them elsewhere next year! Had enough!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2009

I graduated in 2009 from CV-S. I hated it. I was an incredibly active member of everything. From various aspects of sports to the clubs to the music department to the academics. By the middle of my senior year I stopped doing things because it just didn't matter. The students who were there because they had to made it a terrible experience. I was a good student but the only class that prepared me somewhat was AP English, which was a joke to some students. The administration (which has now changed) let the students do whatever they want without any real discipline. There is AP Art, AP Bio (another joke), and AP English. You can also take College US 1&2, Western Civ 1&2, Intro to Sociology and Intro to Psychology for college credit which is a plus. The extracurricular activities are great but not enough to make it worthwhile.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 7, 2007

The extracurricular activities are great. Then it stops. There are very few teachers who care. There is a very poor discipline system. I pulled my 9th grader from school and I am homeschooling him. He is now acheiving his goals. I am very disappointed in Cherry Valley-Springfield high school. Elementary is great.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 30% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
14%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 36% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
7%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 90% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
9%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 30% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
3%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
3%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
42%
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
75%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 33% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
51%
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
4%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
62%
Science

The state average for Science was 69% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
96%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students31%
Female34%
Male29%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White31%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged51%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English31%
Non-migrant31%

Math

All Students26%
Female29%
Male25%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White26%
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English26%
Non-migrant26%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students14%
Female20%
Male9%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged4%
Not economically disadvantaged25%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population16%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English14%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant14%

Math

All Students7%
Female10%
Male4%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged4%
Not economically disadvantaged10%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population8%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English7%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant7%

Science

All Students81%
Female85%
Male77%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population84%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students12%
Female10%
Male14%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged0%
Not economically disadvantaged26%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English12%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant12%

Math

All Students9%
Female5%
Male14%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged5%
Not economically disadvantaged13%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English9%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant9%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students3%
Femalen/a
Male4%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White3%
Economically disadvantaged5%
Not economically disadvantaged0%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population4%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English3%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant3%

Math

All Students3%
Femalen/a
Male4%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White3%
Economically disadvantaged5%
Not economically disadvantaged0%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population4%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English3%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant3%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students45%
Female53%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White45%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English45%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%

Math

All Students24%
Female19%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White24%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged21%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English24%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant24%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students35%
Female44%
Male25%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White35%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Not economically disadvantaged34%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population40%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%

Math

All Students4%
Female4%
Male5%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White4%
Economically disadvantaged8%
Not economically disadvantaged0%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population6%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English4%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant4%

Science

All Students88%
Female92%
Male85%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White88%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant88%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

Algebra II/Trigonometry

The state average for Algebra II/Trigonometry was 66% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
78%
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 76% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
81%
Earth Science

The state average for Earth Science was 72% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
70%
English

The state average for English was 77% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
95%
French

The state average for French was 95% in 2011.

17 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 74% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
100%
Global History and Geography

The state average for Global History and Geography was 71% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
68%
Integrated Algebra

The state average for Integrated Algebra was 73% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
73%
Italian

The state average for Italian was 98% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Living Environment

The state average for Living Environment was 77% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%
Physics

The state average for Physics was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
81%
Spanish

The state average for Spanish was 94% in 2011.

7 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
71%
U.S. History and Government

The state average for U.S. History and Government was 80% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
91%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Regents Examinations to test high school students in English, math, global history and geography, US history and government, living environment, chemistry, Earth science and physics. Students must take at least five Regents Exams in order to graduate. Scores of 65 and above are passing; scores of 55 and above earn credit toward a local diploma (with the approval of the local board of education). The goal is for all students to pass the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

Algebra II/Trigonometry

All Students80%
Female75%
Male86%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged82%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population80%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English80%
Non-migrant80%

Chemistry

All Students78%
Female69%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population78%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English78%
Non-migrant78%

Earth Science

All Students93%
Female94%
Male92%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White93%
Economically disadvantaged92%
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population95%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant93%

English

All Students86%
Female82%
Male89%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant86%

Geometry

All Students88%
Female90%
Male86%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population85%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant88%

Global History and Geography

All Students85%
Female77%
Male93%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged78%
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilities62%
General population93%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant85%

Integrated Algebra

All Students97%
Female96%
Male100%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged95%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities100%
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%

Living Environment

All Students92%
Female94%
Male90%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged88%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant92%

Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Non-migrantn/a

U.S. History and Government

All Students94%
Female93%
Male94%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged88%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population98%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant94%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Regents Examinations to test high school students in English, math, global history and geography, US history and government, living environment, chemistry, Earth science and physics. Students must take at least five Regents Exams in order to graduate. Scores of 65 and above are passing; scores of 55 and above earn credit toward a local diploma (with the approval of the local board of education). The goal is for all students to pass the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 2 98% 48%
Black 2 1% 19%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1 0% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2 0% 9%
Hispanic 1 0% 23%
Two or more races 1 0% 1%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient 0%N/A8%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 242%N/A43%
Source: 1 NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Fewer than 3 years experience 17%N/A5%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree and above 13%N/A39%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher credentials

  This school District averageState average
Teachers with no valid teaching certificate 0%N/A0%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • MS. LAUREN CRISMAN

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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597 County Hwy 54
Cherry Valley, NY 13320
Phone: (607) 264-3257

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