Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Girls Preparatory Charter School of New York

Charter | K-8 | 550 students

Our school is best known for offering a free public single-sex education option.

 
 

Living in New York

Situated in an inner city neighborhood. The median home value is $525,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,270.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 23 ratings
2012:
Based on 26 ratings
2011:
Based on 7 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

74 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted February 23, 2012

I am a former parent as well, as the previous parent stated - the CEO is not to fully blame but he does have a lot to do with the negativity that is now plaguing the school. My daughter was assessed in reading (6th grader) and was told she was on a 3rd grade reading level. When I asked how did she even make it out of elementary school with that level, all I heard were crickets and therefore I did not buy that story. At the new school my daughter is on a 7th grade reading level - what is wrong with this picture? The answer is statistics - GP has sold a lie that all the girls are below reading level and when they are reassessed - they have miraculously jumped 3, 4, and 5 levels - all in the name of trying to fool the parents into thinking their daughters are receiving a stellar education. GP needs to look good in order to bring students in. I know for a fact that a good 90% of the students will be continuing their education elsewhere come Sept. 2012. 2 more students have left as I write this - do not waste your time with this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 20, 2012

I am a former parent, my daughter attended girls prep close to 6 years. The CEO is not to fully blame. The principal stated most of the Girls in middle school are reading below grade level, well most of them came from the elementary school. The reading specialist said my daughter was reading on a third grade level. The assessed her using Fountas and Phinnell, honestly neither one of them knew what they were talking about. In her new school my daughter is assessed by a computer can you believe my daughter does read on a 6th grade level and her comprehension is on a 9th grade level. Im not sure what to say about this. I feel like the school assessed the students on a lower level to make the scores look better for the administration at the end. I agree I think you should visit the school. Please keep in mind there is a big difference between elite school, working class school and the top 2% schools. Do you really want your child to go to a school where they drill information into them and do not produce leaders. Research the difference between the working class schools and private schools. Girls Prep is not the best option. If you can afford to leave then do so.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2012

It is such a shame some parents harbor such intense animosity and are not directing their energy for a more positive investment. If parents have left then maybe it wasn t a fit for their daughters or family however this is not the case of the majority. The school(s) would have huge vacancies; don t you think? Many children and families are desperate and pleading to enter this school. My daughter has been attending here for years and I m not sure if the parents are actually elementary or middle school parents; either way it is a handful not the majority of parents. The school did have their hiccups but what organization doesn t? It is up to the parents to partner with the school to obtain the results we ALL dream for our children. We are ALL responsible to the success or failure of a school; we are ALL accountable-- Eli Manning didn t win the Super Bowl 2012; but the NY Giants. Understand? If you are curious about this school, I say make an appointment and visit the school; and you be the judge. Don't let a few parents mislead a great choice. You would be pleasantly surprised & it's free! Visit several schools but eventually you would want your daughter here! Great School!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2012

Because of this horrible school I am leaving the city in June. The education my daughter & niece receive is very lame and the way the girls are treated - without respect - is something I will not tolerate. I just received a letter that says money is missing. This is not the way to run a school that is so called reformed education. The CEO has bought nothing but negativity to this school, it is time to change. Goodbye!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 22, 2012

I am embarrassed to say that I thought and spoke so highly of this school before. This school is not worthy of any praise. The only good thing that is left is the parents and the students. The elite who donate to this school need to be made aware of how their money is spent to pay teachers who are coached by the administration to not let kids speak, sign language is used because the kids have no voice - the parent's voice has been eliminated, now its the kids turn. How can this exist in this day and age. Parents do not even entertain the thought of sending your child to this school - you will be wasting your time, but more importantly, you will be doing your child and injustice.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2012

Parents look elsewhere - GP has failed miserably and who are they kidding that it is the girls that are out of control and aren't up to grade level (words of the current principal). If this is true then the school gets an F for running themselves into the ground with the poor academics and they do not deserve to be around when their charter is up for review. I have spoken to parents who are no longer here and it is alarming to hear the what 6th grade science students in this school are learning is being taught to 3rd graders elsewhere - that is a hug gap and the administration is to blame. The kids here are being programmed to take tests and not be critical thinkers with a voice. I do not recommend this for any parent who really has their child's best interest at heart. The whole district knows what is going on, sadly the school fooled the parents into signing a handbook without explaining all the drastic changes such as a boot camp method for discipline. The parents didn't read it word for word as there was trust or so we thought it was the same as it had been for all the previous years. When complaints are made they are swept under the rug. I give this school an F.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2012

Fail, Fail, Fail. This school was good until last year it all went downhill and continues to do so at an alarming rate. Parents at this time cannot move the girls because of limited spaces in other schools so they must tough it out. Next year there will be many, many vacant spaces so I hope the parents that are being reeled in read these reviews and know what they are up against. Fail, Fail, Fail.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 18, 2012

This is exactly what's wrong at this school, because we are Title 1 parents they believe we should be grateful for the crumbs they throw at our girls and accept the verbal, physical and emotional abuse that the girls have to put up with every day. Just the other day a teacher used a racial word when talking to a student. The board doesn't care and the administration is a train wreck and at this point in the school year we have no where else to go so we say we are grateful for the crumbs hoping and praying that they treat our daughters well. If this is respect then you have every right to be grateful. Submitted by a parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 18, 2012

The point of no return is where GP is now. This school is trying to model itself after other schools and they get a big F in my book. The emotional abuse adds insult to injury (the weak curriculum). The kids are so far behind in everything in comparison to the DOE schools. The staff has so many turn arounds and the parents aren't notified. The only thing good about this school is that the students are safe from outside danger. The hot lunches that were promised for the Middle School for the last two years are still to be delivered and then the parents are forced to pay $4 a day for a "barely luke warm" lunch. Don't waste your time and your scholar's precious time.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 16, 2012

I am grateful to the teachers and administration who have treated my daughters and our family with respect. I spend a lot of time at Girls Prep and I see how dedicated the staff is and make the students a priority. Thank you, GP, for a job well done.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2011

Wow! I d laugh if it wasn t so sad. In June, 2010 Business Week write such a positive article about our girls learning computer programming. Our daughters jumped and screamed because they were excited about learning and school, and these classes were not even during the week, they were on Saturday. Ian Rowe was hired in August, 2010 two months after this article and things have just gone downhill since then. In February, six months later he fired a good principal. The school has been in confusion since then. I don t even know anymore what this school is about, but it is not about giving my child a good education. I guess the news articles on the website says it all, it is about the big shots looking important. Today, my daughter did not want to go to school. Some parents have already pulled their daughters out, I hear that more are leaving in January, I m trying to encourage my daughter, trying to make her strong if she make it to June, she will not be back in September. I give up.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 7, 2011

I'm not surprised to read any of these comments. After meeting many of the people in leadership positions, for me, it was like seeing a train wreck before it happened. You have a bunch of people running a school aka "the network" who know nothing about schools, but are so high and mighty (read: smug bastards) with their fancy education and know-it-all attitudes. You have a CEO who is more concerned about being flashy and in the news for something he considers great, than he is about the actual well-being and instructional needs of the students. I wish all dissatisfied parents would remove their children from this situation. It's called school choice for a reason and without you, they will have no school.


Posted November 12, 2011

What a disappointment! I regret wasting many years at this school. I believed this Middle School would prepare my daughter (academically) to enter the most challenging high schools but no they are only implementing harsh discipline. This school will not achieve even meager success unless that children believe that they themselves are cared for and learn to care for others. Girls Prep is failing the students in this regard. There is a clear and logical relationship between student discipline and academic achievement. Research shows that students who are disproportionately targeted for disciplinary action are the same students who reflect poor academic achievement. This is why this school is failing but since they don't know it as a parent it is my duty to inform anyone considering this school. Academically, there is no challenge here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 8, 2011

Nothing good left at this Middle School. All the previous comments sum it up. The only good things left are the students who are suffering and the dedicated parents. The administration continues to ignore parents in order to silence them and accept without any questions or concerns that are very vital to the community of the school, students, parents and the curriculum. The principal has the whole staff shaking in their boots - the staff is forced to treat the kids so unfairly. Please find another school if you feel nurturing is part of what you always want to give your kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 8, 2011

The spirits of the students have been crushed and all the fights to ensure space for this school was a total waste. This school is trying to discipline these girls with unacceptable methods for instance a girl wants to use the bathroom and she is not allowed to. Girls have to sit in SLANT (sit up straight, listening, ask & answer questions, nod and track the speaker) and if they don't do all of these they get penalized and with demerits. Girls get detention for being 1 minute late and they sit by number order since the beginning as if they were in a penitentiary. Girls cannot sneeze, cough, burp, hiccup. There are hand gestures for everything - the girls cannot interact with each other - this is not healthy. The kids are not nurtured with care, compassion and respect. This school is good if your kid is a robot only programmed to take state tests. I would not recommend this school to anyone. Parents are fed up that the administration has failed to look out for the kids before their pockets - more funding over curriculum and community at this school. Parent involvement has gone from 99% to 1%.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 8, 2011

Good for nothing school who fires a principal in the middle of the year (2010) and leaves the school without any leadership. In 2011 they come back with a principal who has no clue what to do and intimidates the staff into mistreating the girls. Who wants to deal with this - not this parent - I'm done! Only the girls lose in this case. 5 girls have left the school before November. The school is good at covering things up - real good and convincing but not anymore - parents are on them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2011

Before you enroll your child at Girls Prep please do your research......The school is no longer what it use to be. The board is more concern about funding than the students .......the list of issues is very long. All the great teachers are gone! The exceptional School Culture gone!! The Girls Prep parents thought so hard to establish is GONE!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2009

GIRLS PREP IS #1 IN MY BOOK! I'm a proud parent of a 4th grader who's been with Girls Prep since Kindergarten, and I've never come across a better grade school than Girls Prep! She loves her teachers, the staff and all of her Girls Prep sisters. Their day is rigorous, but the girls are troopers, and they make Girls Prep their own. For my daughter's young age, I've watched her grow and strive beyond my expectations, and I've been told how maturely and intelligently she presents herself by others as well. I owe it to Girls Prep for giving my baby girl the stepping stones she'll need to prepare in the years ahead. I'm behind Girls Prep 100%, all the way, till the end!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2009

I love the fact that parents are encouraged to do what ever is possible for the continued growth in their children whether its through volunteering or at home work. Its great motivation to see how everyone works as a team!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2009

Hello my name is Marjorie Gabriel, and my daughter Adenike has been in Girls Prep for four years now. I love the fact that is and diverse of all types of girls. And they known each other of years. The excellent academic curriculum, added with what she gets at home seals the deal. Girls prep is #1
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
86%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 30% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
65%
Math

The state average for Math was 36% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 90% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
53%
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
74%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 30% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
57%
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 33% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 69% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students26%
Female26%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic35%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population29%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English26%
Non-migrant26%

Math

All Students30%
Female30%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic31%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population35%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English30%
Non-migrant30%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students32%
Female32%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic32%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population35%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%

Math

All Students49%
Female49%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic52%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population51%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English49%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant49%

Science

All Students98%
Female98%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic96%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged97%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant98%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students29%
Female29%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%

Math

All Students21%
Female21%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic24%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged12%
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students42%
Female42%
Malen/a
African American48%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population49%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant42%

Math

All Students56%
Female56%
Malen/a
African American64%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic37%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population62%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant56%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students44%
Female44%
Malen/a
African American36%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic54%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population51%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%

Math

All Students22%
Female22%
Malen/a
African American15%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged27%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population25%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant22%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students26%
Female26%
Malen/a
African American25%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic28%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged27%
Students with disabilities10%
General population30%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant26%

Math

All Students43%
Female43%
Malen/a
African American40%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic43%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged48%
Students with disabilities10%
General population51%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%

Science

All Students71%
Female71%
Malen/a
African American75%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic67%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged68%
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities40%
General population79%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant71%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 2 50% 19%
Hispanic 1 46% 23%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2 2% 9%
White 2 2% 48%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1 0% 1%
Two or more races 1 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NYSED, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient 24%N/A8%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 261%N/A43%
Female 2100%N/A49%
Male 20%N/A51%
Source: 1 NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Fewer than 3 years experience 6%N/A5%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree and above 14%N/A39%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher credentials

  This school District averageState average
Teachers with no valid teaching certificate 0%N/A0%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Computer specialist(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Gardening teacher(s)
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Math specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Nurse(s)
Reading specialist(s)
Security personnel
School social worker/counselors(s)
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Tutor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff None
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Special education / special needs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Special education
Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Extra learning resources offered
  • Differentiated learning programs
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Technology
Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Gardening teacher(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
Clubs
  • Math club

Arts & music

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Arts (all)
  • Music
  • Visual arts
Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Poetry
Media arts
  • Graphics
  • Technical design and production
  • Video / Film production

Language learning

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Foreign languages
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs
Languages supported by ESL/ELL programs
  • Other
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Gardening teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
School leaders can update this information here.
The NYC Department of Education asked parents, teachers and students about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, safe, communicative and collaborative. Learn more

The information captured by the survey is designed to support a dialogue among all members of the school community about how to make the school a better place to learn. An overall category score is calculated for each respondent group (parents, teachers, or students) by averaging the scores of the questions within that survey category.

Category scores for each of the respondent groups are then combined to form overall category scores. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all NYC public schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the NYC DOE survey »Close
Based on 631 responses

This school provides ... 1

A safe and respectful environmentWhat's this?

This score measures whether parents, students and teachers feel that the school creates a physically and emotionally secure environment in which everyone can focus on student learning.

Close
 
This school
8.2
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.7
 

Students

This school

 
7.5
 

Teachers

This school

 
8.3
 
Clear, useful communication about educational goalsWhat's this?

This score measures whether parents, students and teachers feel that the school provides information about the school's educational goals and offers appropriate feedback on each student's learning outcome.

Close
 
This school
8.1
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.9
 

Students

This school

 
7.5
 

Teachers

This school

 
7.9
 
Strong parent, teacher and student engagementWhat's this?

This score measures how engaged parents, students and teachers feel they are in an active and vibrant partnership to promote student learning.

Close
 
This school
7.6
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.6
 

Students

This school

 
6.7
 

Teachers

This school

 
7.5
 
High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures how well parents, students and teachers feel that the school develops rigorous and meaningful academic goals that encourage students to do their best.

Close
 
This school
8.4
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.9
 

Students

This school

 
8.3
 

Teachers

This school

 
7.9
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents41885%
Students16198%
Teachers5298%

12012-2013 New York City Department of Education School Survey

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School start time
  • 7:50 am
School end time
  • 3:45 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • MS. VERSHA MUNSHI-SOUTH
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Gender
  • All girls
Special schedule
  • Extended/longer school day
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (212) 338-1086

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • College prep
  • STEM
  • Teacher-run
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Arts (all)
  • Foreign languages
  • Humanities
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Science
  • Service learning
  • Special education
  • Technology
  • Visual arts
  • Writing
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs
Languages supported by ESL/ELL programs
  • Other
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Gardening teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Reading specialist(s)
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
  • Tutor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • None
Extra learning resources offered
  • Career/college counseling
  • Counseling
  • Differentiated learning programs
  • Mentoring
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
  • Tutoring
Transportation options
  • Passes/tokens for public transportation
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • College/career center
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Playground
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Fencing
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Poetry
Media arts
  • Graphics
  • Technical design and production
  • Video / Film production

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Math club
  • Student council/government
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Volunteer in the classroom
More from this school
  • Girls Prep LES opened in 2005 as the first all-girls charter school in NYC. Girls Prep LES is part of the Public Prep Network, a nonprofit organization that develops single-sex elementary and middle public schools that pursue excellence through continuous learning and data-driven instruction. Our model is designed to empower each student to build strong character, demonstrate critical thinking, possess a core body of knowledge, and be on a predictive path to earn a degree from a university.
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

This school accepts applications on a

rolling basis

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?

Applications received for the 2011-2012 school year
901
Students typically come from these schools
Girls Prep Lower East Side Elementary School
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

442 E Houston St-Rm 312
New York, NY 10002
Website: Click here
Phone: (212) 388-0241

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools


Ps 94
New York, NY






ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT