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GreatSchools Rating

John Motley Morehead

Public | 550 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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20 reviews of this school


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Posted December 6, 2013

My son has attended Morehead since Kindergarten , he is now in the 4th grade. I have had nothing more than a positive experience because his father and I are active parents. The school pushes each child to achieve and expands learning beyond the normal deskwork but engages them constantly. Our son loves his school and his grades reflect it. Thanks Morehead STEM Academy Staff for a job well done.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2013

I have 3 children that attend Morehead. 2 of which have been there since Pre-K and 1 that has been the re since 1st grade. The best thing that could have happened was them transitioning to a K-8 school. I love the fact that the teachers really care about the students. I love professional Mondays. This allows children to learn early the importance of professionalism.My oldest will be graduating this year and I have had no complaints thus far. I honestly don't think that my children would have received the education or the experience at any other school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2012

I have a wonderful 6 year old son that attends John Motley Morehead STEM Academy as a first grader. He is currently making all 3's. He attended Kindergarten at University Meadows. It is obvious that the teachers and administrative staff at Morehead STEM desire to see their students succeed. The teachers work very hard and dedicate much of their time to the school. I love that my son's teacher encourages her students to participate in class and encourages good character growth through a barrage of different techniques. Students work algebra problems in class and are also required to complete some for homework (with parental assistance). I also love that every Monday the school ask that parents send their students to school in professional dress. This was just instituted as a means to teach kids about the importance of professionalism. My son's teacher needs to do a better job at communicating the curriculum to parents. If I did not ask my son daily about his school activities, I would not know about them at all. Or I would have to reach out to the teacher by emailing or classroom visit. I can do a better job at home if I knew where the finish line was located.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 23, 2012

A 4th grade teacher announced to the class that she should have been a doctor instead of a teacher. Now what kind of role model is this? And the new principal want reprimand her because he is new to the school. I'm not impressed. And the homework assignments are put together so bad that your child or the parent can't understand how to solve it. So sick of school like this they make your child want to give up.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2012

It is a great school! Our daughter loves her teachers and going to school everyday!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2012

The wonderful thing about a magnet school is if you are not happy with it then your child can go some where else. I don't understand if you feel this way why you keep them there. There were 700+ people on the waitlist that would love that spot. Our experience has been nothing but positive but I understand with any school that will not always be the case. The school states at the start of the year it is a tough program, that will require hard work on the part of the child and the parent. There are days we struggle to keep up with the work load but it is worth it when you look at what they are learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 2, 2011

These teachers are THE hardest working educators in Charlotte. While they are given updates in technology and work hard to write grants for more opportunities for students, they are expected to give their entire lives (24-7) to meet the demands of administration. JMM can go so much farther with parents who are RESPECTFUL, UNDERSTANDING, and SUPPORTIVE. Overall, parents do not trust the faculty when their child's misbehavior is disciplined. JMM needs a PTA that is organized and welcoming! Parents get turned off by the PTA when it is not inviting. The administration seems to be the source of the high turnover rate. Since the latest principal joined, more than half of the teachers have left JMM to move onto other schools. The principal even left in the middle of this year! The school will benefit ten-fold with a STRONG, SUPPORTIVE, and ORGANIZED administration! The teachers are incredibly dedicated to the students and school, and they need to be better respected and appreciated by students, parents, and administration. Clean Facilities, Tight Schedule, Heavy STEM integration in all subjects, DEDICATED teachers, Use of new teaching strategies, Challenging & rigorous curriculum


Posted October 4, 2011

I am so impressed with this school!!! My son started Kindergarten this year and I can't believe how challenged and happy he is. He loves it. The teachers are so supportive and wonderful, we could not be happier!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 17, 2011

My daughter was a kindergartener this past school year and we had a great experience with Morehead. She learned so much! She is already reading and writing and her math skills are great for her age. I am very happy that she attends this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 3, 2010

My son loves this school as the teachers are cooperative and extra curricular activities like Spelling Bee, Math Superstars, Science Fair and other events like egg-drop. They are organized very well. This is a perfect school to nurture the kids as responsible citizens.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2010

We love the school. My son finished Kindergarten and is going to first grade this fall. He has learnt a lot even in KG and we can really see the difference in his behaviour and discipline so far. The teachers are very caring and we love the fact that he gets homework to improve on what he learns at school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2010

I have a 1st grader and this is our 2nd yr at Morehead. Because of the no child left behind act, and the area that I live in this is unfortunately the highest graded, non title I school that is in my area and pool of schools to choose from. This school is not that great. They hide behind their Magnet compact, while they break your child down, give work above grade level, and fail to give you the tools that are needed to help your child be successful at shcool.My child was assessed and not taught, from day 1 it was she is unable to do this, and couldn't tell me that. My question is ARE YOU HEAR TO ASSESS FOR 'DATA' OR ARE YOU HERE TO TEACH?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 12, 2010

I am very pleased with Morehead Elementary School. My two older children graduated from the school, and my younger two are there now. I am happy to know that middle school program has been added to the school. I am glad that my daughter will be one of the pioneers of the 6th grade class starting 2011. Parents should take more responsibilities for their child's behavior rather than putting all blames onto the staff at Morehead.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2009

It is the only math and science magnet elementary school in the district. We will soon add grades 6-8 over the next 3 years. We are working to become the premier math and science school in the state. Most of our students come from low income households, and monetary suport is all but nonexistant. We have become a flagship school for a number of programs, and we're hoping to increase availability of technology around the school. We're on our way to the top!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 3, 2009

It has the best first grade teachers!!!


Posted October 24, 2006

My child was enrolled last year at Morehead. My experience was very negative. The teacher was inadequate...they did not want to be there and it reflected their classroom performance. The staff was not inviting when I tried to voluntary at my child's school or visit. The PTA was non existing because the Principal was not very cooperative. I am very blessed to have a teacher this year that is new to CMS and not tainted by the system yet. Although the school as a whole is not where I would like them... my child's classroom teacher is exceptional and out weighs the negative factors.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2006

My daughter has been at Morehead since her 1st grade year. I must say how dissappointed I was at how the teachers response to parent inquires has not been effective. My daughter talks about how the principle has no compassion for the students at all. She is very unhappy and I must say so am I. The teachers do not take an active role in notifying parents when problems are needed to be handled. They wait until it is too late to contact you when your child is doing poorly. I cannot give Morehead the seal of approval because I have not seen anything to be happy of to motivate the parents or students. My child has had to deal with bullying on the buses. She has be verbally abused by other children. The response was not in a timely manner. Morehead needs to get it together!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 19, 2004

We feel fortunate that our 2 sons have had some of the best teachers at Morehead. We have been pleased with their level of commitment as teachers to bring out the best in each student. We are also impressed by the fact that the Principal knows each student by name and is very personable and available. Even the front office staff are kind and very helpful. We feel we made a good choice by choosing Morehead.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2003

I have an older daughter that attended this school last year and is now in middle school this year. Prior to that,she was on the A/B honor roll for each of the three years she attended this school. Her teachers were very consistent as far as reporting her progress and responding to concerns that I might have had. I now have twins that attend as well since last year and I can't describe the amazing progress they have made in such little time while being enrolled at this school. The teachers are very dedicated and committed to their jobs and have kept my attitude of my children's education very positive. I now have two more children that will be attending this year and next due to the hard work of the principal that assisted me in a transferring problem I had with my newly enrolled Kindergartener. The office secretary that took my message for the pricipal was very understanding and knowledgable after hearing my problem and delivered my message with such promptness,I was blown away. I am the least worried about my children's safety and know that they are in great hands.There is no doubt in my mind that the decision I made to keep all of my children at this school was one of the best decisions I've made in my life. I'd like to congratulate the staff of Morehead Elementary for such a commendable job. Thank you and keep up the good work!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2003

I have 4 children in this school and last year I had a total of 5. I am very disappointed with the safety and discipline this school provides. Last year my son had a big problem with being harassed in the class room. He had an excellent teacher, but the children that were doing the harassing, basically kept getting slapped on the wrist. One of his best friends was pulled out of school because of the harassment and the ability or lack there of, of the principle to put a stop to it. Another applied to a different school. For the same reasons. Their teacher who was tired of all this, resigned and went to a private school because of this problem. This year, there is the same problem with a child in my daughter s class room. This 5th grader is very violent and has physically and verbally hurt a few children, including my daughter. I have wrote to the principle and the assistant principle about this problem and nothing much has been done. I don't know if other parents have any idea how much our children are put in this kind of danger by returning these violent and harassing children to our public schools. I will make it my goal, to inform as many parents of what happens in this school. Please help me to change this kind of tolerance towards the harassing children. Thank you, Rena Crews


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

118 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

118 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

118 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 56% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 64% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students55%
Female56%
Male54%
Black51%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged51%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students56%
Limited English proficiency42%
Proficient in English56%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students45%
Female54%
Male38%
Black38%
Asiann/a
Hispanic56%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiency33%
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Academically gifted80%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students90%
Female90%
Male89%
Black86%
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantaged84%
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students91%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant90%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students69%
Female79%
Male61%
Black66%
Asiann/a
Hispanic63%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students69%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students68%
Female66%
Male69%
Black69%
Asiann/a
Hispanic58%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged63%
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students50%
Female58%
Male44%
Black49%
Asiann/a
Hispanic37%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students51%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students77%
Female70%
Male82%
Black76%
Asiann/a
Hispanic74%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged74%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students48%
Female36%
Male55%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English48%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant48%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female51%
Male65%
Black55%
Asiann/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged51%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students45%
Female44%
Male46%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanic35%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students45%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female67%
Male75%
Black69%
Asiann/a
Hispanic70%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students72%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students59%
Female57%
Male61%
Black54%
Asiann/a
Hispanic69%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students59%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant59%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students57%
Female61%
Male54%
Black57%
Asiann/a
Hispanic56%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English58%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant57%
Academically gifted94%

Science

All Students87%
Female90%
Male85%
Black85%
Asiann/a
Hispanic-95%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged87%
Not economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students87%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant87%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

25 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male-95%
Black-95%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged-95%
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically gifted-95%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 65% 26%
Hispanic 15% 14%
White 8% 52%
Asian 7% 3%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 1% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 0%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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7810 Neal Rd
Charlotte, NC 28262
Website: Click here
Phone: (980) 343-5773

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