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Sugar Creek Charter

Charter | K-8 | 858 students

 

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Living in Charlotte

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $193,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $660.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted November 25, 2013

I officiated a basketball game at Davidson on 11/21/2013 I was impressed by the courtsey and sportman ship displayed by the girls team and their coach,pass along a word of praise to them


Posted September 23, 2013

I am an eighth grader at Sugar Creek Charter School and I believe that Sugar Creek provides an excellent learning environment for us kids.Our school is a great learning environment because it teaches us not only things that can get you in college,but also things that can get you places in life.At Sugar Creek we have a class based on character. Our character classes teaches you about real life things such as poverty and how even to act in a professional way when getting a job to prepare us for the future as well as the present.Our school builds character while building our minds to shape tomorrow's generation.I like that we are able to get some of our high school credits while in middle school,most colleges look for those kind of rates. Sugar creek charter school is a excellent learning academy that teaches students a variety of subjects while building their characters and preparing them for the future.In conclusion,I recommend Sugar creek charter school to you as an excellent learning experience for your kids for grades Kindergarten to 8th


Posted December 21, 2012

I am an eighth grader currently attending Sugar Creek Charter School. I have been attending Sugar Creek since 2010. I like this school because it provides many options like 2 high school courses, Geometry and Algebra 1. I am currently taking Geometry. The teachers at Sugar Creek are nice and understanding. If you have a problem like bullying they will get to the bottom of it. This school makes you feel safe and secure 8 hours every day. Another thing I like about Sugar Creek is that they have half days. No school in CMS has half days. Lots of charter schools don't have transportation but Sugar Creek does. We are different than other schools. No other school will give you a iPod touch for making double 4's or and iPad for quadrupedal 4's. CMS school won't take you on field trips when you don't get all A's or no infraction or referrals. You should MOST DEFINITELY send your child to Sugar Creek. Thanks


Posted November 22, 2012

I am an eigth grader currently attending SCCS and i have been attending Sugar Creek Since '10 . Overall this school is OK. Some of the teachers are very caring and understanding. I am a straight A student and currently taking high school geometry. Last year i took high school algebra 1. My old geometry teacher, Mr. Supia was always pushing us to study and do work , but then he left. Now our teacher Mrs.Biggerstaff just doesnt care what we do. Half of the class is talking and the other is on there phone. Only (Maybe) 2% of the class is actually paying attention. Its very hard to learn when others aroungd me are being disruptive. Also the principle is NEVER at school . This school does very much so LACK LEADERSHIP. But other than that the school is a 3/5 star school and i Would Recommend It :)


Posted August 12, 2012

My son and I really love this school. His grades and his performance have improved greatly since leaving CMS. I recommend this school to anyone that has any concern about their childs education in CMS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2010

I am a parent of SCCS for 4 year I have two kids there. I really enjoyed 4 years. My daugther was very shy person, after working with Ms Fischer her 1st year of 1st grade. She blossomed and was not afraid to wear her glasses. Also my son gets all 4's every year on the EOG Test. Therefore I am very please and honor to have my childrean in a learning , safe , and healthy environment. I do recommend other families. Thank you, Wanchia Family
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 18, 2009

I have two children who attend SCCS. This school lacks leadership. Mrs. Turner, the director/CEO need an attitude refresher course. She lacks professionalism in many ways. I do think this school would be better with all new administrators.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2009

I have a student who graduated from SCCS in 2009 and took high school algera. And I still have three children still there one who is in the 7th grade and take high school algebra. I think that the children at SCCS is very good school whne it comes to caring for the children education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2007

I have 3 kids attending SCCS. My eldest is 13 and he is taking a high school math course. I like the way the test and keep you advanced. I can honestly say that my kids are learning and comprehending above & beyond their current grade levels in comparsion to other kids (in other school areas). They are very much advanced. Also, they do not tolerate to much distraction or interruptions which is good. Nip it in the bud at the beginning and have a better school academic atmosphere. All of my kids will be ready for high school and beyond....
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2007

My experience w/ Sugarcreek Charter school was extremely poor. There was a total lack of communication between the staff & parents, no method of appealing unilateral decisions, & no system of checks & balances put in place to monitor the fairness of decisions. My children will not be returning & I would urge any parent to think twice before enrolling their child in that school. The attitudes of both the teachers & administration is poor which negatively impacts the students ability to learn.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2006

this school is a good school one of my tachers even help me get ready for high school since it was a new experience for me thank you
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 24, 2005

I was a student at SCCS for 6 years and i can say that it is a wonderful school and it has taught me everything i know, almost.You feel quite safe at our school because it isn't overcrwded likek some CMS schools, and they do not put up with anyone who is a distracion of the learning enviornment(of course i would know). Overall this is a wonderful school and i hope your children enjoy it as much as i did.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 14, 2005

My children have attended the CMS system and I find this charter to much better meet their needs-academically & socially. I find that the teachers (at SCCS) place more emphasis on the child's learning ability & potential & tend not to judge based solely on behavior. This was one of the flaws I found too many time in CMS schools. Teachers tend to be overwhelmed and would 'lump' the children in a category of 'difficult-learners', bad behaved and just plain 'poor.'
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2004

My child have gone to SCCS since she was 5 years old. SCCS is a school where the children come first. Each child is encouraged to do their personal best without being labeled. The teachers take an interest in your child's progression. They welcome parental input and the teachers and staff are available to parents with questions all the time. My child has progressed very well attending SCCS and I do not think that she would have done as well at a Mecklenburg school. I am quite pleased with this school and encourage other parents to enroll their child here. The school would welcome more diversity amongst its students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 2, 2004

My daughters were students at Sugar Creek Charter we moved and moved out of the district of Sugar Creek also I didn't have a car to get them back and forth so they had to go to school in our neighborhood but next year they will be going back to Sugar Creek I have a car Now. But in all that,this is a very good school. Educational and Convenience. Thanks Sugar Creek we will be back!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
43%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
52%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
67%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students40%
Female40%
Male40%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students43%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students32%
Female36%
Male28%
Black32%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students35%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students47%
Female62%
Male34%
Black45%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged25%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students53%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant47%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students25%
Female33%
Male17%
Black23%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students28%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English25%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant25%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students45%
Female50%
Male40%
Black44%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged45%
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students49%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English45%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students21%
Female22%
Male19%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged18%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students22%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students36%
Female36%
Male36%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students39%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant36%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students30%
Female24%
Male34%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students30%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English30%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant30%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students38%
Female39%
Male38%
Black37%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged38%
Not economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students39%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant38%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students52%
Female61%
Male45%
Black51%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students56%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students58%
Female66%
Male51%
Black58%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged59%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students59%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English58%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students39%
Female36%
Male42%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students41%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English39%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant39%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students32%
Female41%
Male21%
Black32%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students33%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students67%
Female64%
Male70%
Black67%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged66%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant67%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students47%
Female50%
Male44%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged45%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students45%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant47%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 96% 26%
Hispanic 3% 14%
Two or more races 1% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Asian 0% 3%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
White 0% 52%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 85%N/A50%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ms Cheryl Turner
Fax number
  • (704) 921-1004

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
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4101 North Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC 28206
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 509-5470

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