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Metrolina Regional Scholars Academy

Charter | K-8 | 359 students

 

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Living in Charlotte

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $75,500. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $800.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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32 reviews of this school


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Posted September 7, 2012

We have several children at this school (one of which has "graduated" to regular public high school.) Scholars is AWESOME---especially comparing my child's readiness to his high school peers. Great parents, accelerated llearning, diversity, lack of private school "affluenza" and the companionship of other smart kids. The beauty of this school is how smart kids feed off each other, support each other and make each other better. My high schooler still considers his Scholars' friends his closest buds.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2012

This could be an excellent school that has been lacking direction in curriculm, best practices, and teacher leadership. Its excellent scores are due to the hardworking nature of the students. I rated it above average because of the students and how they interact. Parents eyes are now open and they are eager to be able to finally advocate for their children. I hope that the teachers who are excellent will continue to flourish (and there are some really good ones) and the teachers who are constantly yelling at the students will be dismissed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2011

We love the Scholars' Academy. It has been such a blessing in our lives. Our child wakes up everyday excited about school. The teachers are great, their knowledge of gifted children is phenomenal. They know what these kids need. Love it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 2, 2010

My kids and I have been very happy with this school. I've read the reviews below criticizing the school because there are so many siblings attending that are not gifted. That is not true, as every student at the school must meet the minimum IQ requirements to get in. I also saw the review about lacking a science lab, and the new location now has an impressive lab. Another reviewer wrote that teachers focus on the slower kids. That's just silly. There are no slow kids at this school. Now, there are differing levels of giftedness, but during our five years at the school, every teacher has either grouped kids according to ability (ex: in math) and has allowed kids to progress as quickly as they are able. The parents are incredibly supportive, and the kids care about their education. The school is consistently at the very top in NC testing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 25, 2010

**WOW** Fantastic new school building with all the bells and whistles has just opened this week (8/25/10) The teachers / staff along with all the really bright kids have made this K-8 a unique learning place and the school now has the facilities it deserves. I find the mixed comments on this site rather odd, as without doubt as its reputation grows this will be the premiere school to aim for in Charlotte if you have gifted children. I have older kids who've been through the public magnets, top private, and parochial schools here in town so I know what I'm talking about and can honestly say i am continually grateful my youngest son is so happy here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2010

This school is for gifted (TD) level kids. The highly gifted and profoundly gifted are pretty much on their own. Not much different than a traditional school. The teachers spend most of their time with the kids on the lower scale. The higher scale kids are told to not work ahead and stay with their group. It' s a shame. We thought we had found a solution.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2009

It totally prepared by daughter for high school. She had a great connection with all her teachers, a one on one you don't find very often.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2009

My children are challanged all the time, and the staff is fantastic!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2009

I have finally found a school that is challenging my son without bombarding him with homework!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2009

Kids are encouraged to reach their fullest individual potential in an active and challenging environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2009

Here is what my impression of school is: 1) Excellent, studious kids that make the school special. It makes kids very competitive. 2) Accelerated Math program in middle school 3) Small class size 4) A lot of parents involvement Now some suggestions: 1) Enrichment classes are very average. Kids cannot speak Chinese or Spanish, comfortably, after learning it for 8 years which is a shame. Too much of teacher turnover and no tangible goals set on what this program will achieve. 3) Curriculum is set randomly. For middle school science, there are no textbooks which is shocking. It is solely upto the teacher on what to teach. It makes program too much teacher dependent. No independent body oversees curriculum guidelines. 4) School has very average music/art and very little sports. 5) No science labs in middle school due to lack of funds. I still give the school a 5 ratings because overall the school is much better than CMS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2009

I have 2 kids in MRSA - 3rd and 4th grade. Both went to the best rated public elementary school in Charlotte, prior to joining MRSA. I am extremely satisfied with the quality of education and the academic challenges provided by MRSA. My older child was in public school while my younger child got accepted earlier in MRSA (both kids have same IQ level, but both were on wait list). My younger child at MRSA was doing more accelerated program compared to her older brother in public school, such that he could not wait to get into MRSA. Great job staff and director.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 1, 2009

I have been very pleased with this school. My child is thriving in a way that would not have been possible in a traditional public school. He is surrounded by other children that enjoy learning and being challenged. The classes are small, and the principal and the teachers are really engaged and into their jobs. Being a part of this school has been a wonderful experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2009

This our fourth year at Scholars' Academy. I am so grateful this school exists ... more importantly my child is happy, thriving and is part of a warm, welcoming, diverse school community. As a charter school, limited funds mean no fancy buildings and resources, but the tradeoff in the high quality education, teaching, parent involvement and leadership from Dr. Peine more than make up for that!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 30, 2008

This is the third year our children have been at this school and I cannot imagine a better place for them. I am forever amazed with what they can pull off with the limited funding available for charter schools. I credit Dr. Peine, the staff, and parents for working together to make this incredible school possible. The Scholars' Academy students (our children!) depend on everyone working together. If there is something you would like to see changed then please come to a PTO or Board meeting to offer your suggestions AND your TIME. My experience has been that the parents who grumble the most are the ones who do not spend any time helping out. If you don't have time to spare than contribute generously to the Annual Drive.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2008

I am a proud parent of 2 children at this school. But first make no mistake; it is the students that make this school special. All of the students had to pass entrance requirements and yes there are varying degrees of 'giftedness' among the student population but they all benefit from the interaction with each other in this culturally and economically diverse environment. They are remarkable children and we as parents should feel fortunate that they have the opportunity to interact with each other in an academic setting. Secondly, from my experience, the teaching staff is dedicated and also feels fortunate that they have students that are enthusiastic about learning although I get the feeling it can be challenging. The curriculum is accelerated but is still customized to meet the various strengths and weaknesses of each child. The important thing is that the teachers do seem to genuinely care about each
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 16, 2008

I am a parent of 2 children at this school and we love it! My children (each of whom had to meet the IQ requirements - as there are no benefits for siblings) both look forward to each day and come home excited about that day's learnings. We feel extremely fortunate to have the opportunity that MRSA provides to us right here in Charlotte.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2008

Too much parent interference in the lower grades, they seem to run the school and you are right only certain kids get into trouble. THe enrichment classes are a farce.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 11, 2008

'And that focus is on the children rather than the whims of unrealistic parents who just don't have a clue.' Good job on noticing that. More and more kids are getting into trouble because of the lack of administration. Many students don't respect the teachers, and some kids that should get in trouble don't get in trouble. More kids are failing tests etc because the princiapl doesn't care about it anymore. The school is going to move to downtown sometimes in the future. Lots of students have a hard time getting here already.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2008

I'm the parent of two children who attend this school, and I've been very impressed with the quality of the teachers. In addition, one of the things that I find most valuable about the school is that the students intellectually stimulate each other, and their lunchtime and recess conversations often reveal that these are kids who are excited about learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students93%
Female86%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian90%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students91%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant93%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Female-95%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian90%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students91%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant90%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students93%
Female86%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian93%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students93%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant93%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students-95%
Female91%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students95%
Female-95%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students87%
Female79%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian91%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students87%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant87%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students95%
Female-95%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian91%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students88%
Female77%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students88%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant88%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students92%
Female86%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian91%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students92%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant92%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 51% 52%
Asian 36% 3%
Black 7% 26%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Two or more races 2% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Anthony M Yodice
Fax number
  • (704) 503-1183

Resources

Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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Seventy-Seven Center Drive
Charlotte, NC 28217
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 503-1112

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