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Piedmont Community Charter School

Charter | K-12 | 1181 students

 

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Living in Gastonia

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $75,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $680.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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41 reviews of this school


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Posted February 4, 2014

I have been very disappointed with this school. My son attends the elementary campus. We have no free time due to all the homework that is assigned. I feel the parents do more work than the teachers and their test scores are not so good. Only 90% of the teachers are highly qualified. He has had two great teachers since attending the school. I am considering other schools in the area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 8, 2014

The teachers don't care about the students. The teachers witness bullying and just watch while no discipline or punishment is done. There's no cafeteria, students have to bring their own lunch. There has lately been more fights, causing in suspensions.


Posted October 8, 2013

I love the diversity of the student body at Piedmont Charter School. There is an emphasis on the arts that my daughter loves--music (chorus, strings), art and art appreciation, etc. There are top notch educators who really care about their profession. I highly recommend Piedmont!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2013

I am very happy with choosing to send my children to PCCS. It's a challenging school with lots to offer the children. The curriculum is one that keeps the children learning and engaging in their school work. I am happy that they wear uniforms and on some occasions let them wear jeans and such. The teachers and staff are the best in this county and they ultimately care for the children's progression and their education. They want nothing more than to see our children succeed and that's all I can ask for as a parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 14, 2013

My child is a rising 6th grader and has attended PCCS since kindergarten. She was actually enrolled in a "public" school, we had all paperwork/testing completed, then I found PCCS and immediately enrolled her. She isn't so fond of the uniforms, but that isn't as big of a deal at this point (and I LOVE uniforms!!). I have never regretted the decision for her to attend PCCS and fully support the school and staff in all endeavors. My husband is a 6th grade public school teacher and was using the same material in his classroom as our daughter had in 3rd and 4th grade! It blew our mind to compare the work level, but also confirmed we made the right decision in PCCS. I really do love this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2013

Let's be fair here. Gaston County has horrible schools. Let's face it. We pay very little in property taxes, very little in taxes in general, and they're cutting teachers left and right. Some schools are hiring teachers in for substantially less than what they paid for college for a year. It is a noble profession, but it seems in Gaston County, it may be the noblest. Then you have the parents, who have really done a horrible job teaching their kids how to act. So if you are a teacher who has decided to keep their job, you're constantly babysitting or even worse, in danger. It is no coincidence some high schools in the area have less than a 50% graduation rate. Those being said, PCCS does an OK job compensating. PCCS is not without fault. There is no lunch room. Kids bring their lunches or parents visit with lunch in the classroom. This could also be looked at as a positive. The school programs are minimal and little or no sports. This is OK as the YMCA and other organizations have picked up some slack. The school is constantly fundraising. This gets annoying. The subject matter is on par with what I would expect. The teachers are above average. I like the kids wear uniforms.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2013

Piedmont is an awesome school. The teachers and administrators love the students. If you have a problem they will help you and your student solve it. The students are well behaved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 24, 2012

I have a granddaughter entering the 2nd grade and one just entering kindergarten - we are so very pleased with both the curiculum and the teaching staff!!


Posted August 15, 2012

One of the best schools I've ever ever been to, the people are so nice


Posted July 10, 2012

I am a parent of a rising second grader at Piedmont Charter. I could not be more pleased with the school. The cirriculum is diverse and challenging. The staff is awesome and the parent involvment is unbelievable. My son learns things that other kids do not learn until fifth or sixth grade. I would recommend this school to any parent who wants their child to receive the best education possible. E. Rhyne.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2011

This school is simply amazing! PCCS urges the children to succeed with more challenging work that stimulates their minds and helps them grow. My son is in First Grade and he brings home challenging spelling words, advanced reading, and sometimes algebra! He is already on a third grade reading level and can finish his math homework with NO PROBLEM! The teachers and staff are wonderful and the parent involvement is superb!! This school should be rated more than a 6!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2010

I like the way the school is set up. The kids do not not wear cloths with labels on them, and I think that is great. This way nobody knows how much or how little you spent or wear you bought them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2010

PCCS is a good school. It is head and shoulders above the other elementary schools in the district. Yes, I am a little biased.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted February 5, 2010

I know ALOT about PCCS! Our family has been there since the ribbon cutting! SUPER GREAT in the beginning! Not so good now. Classroom sizes are doubled, and the teachers are overwhelmed with only a handfull of full-time assistants. I think PCCS needs to have a cut-off on enrollment,( more like Highland Tech.) Focusing on what really works! Patience, kindness, structure, and most of all, leaving NO child behind! And, it IS true ' if you and/or your child make waves (become 'LABLED'), being pushed out is an understatement! Safety is my #1 priority for my kids, so we are not going anywhere. We are just going to keep our faith, and do alot of praying for a more positive school experience at PCCS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2009

Our school is a great School because we have great teachers who care, and lots of parents, who volunteer their time to help our school grow.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2009

They really care about the students and they make sure thay have the tools to learn


Posted August 26, 2009

Great school, with good parent teacher communication.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 8, 2009

This is my oldest second year, and my sons first. We were pleased with school last year, however this year, my son went from student of year in pre k, to what his teacher says is a behavior child. Granted this is coming from a sub, his regular teacher said he was doing great, right before moved to 2nd grade. They cut ten teachers hours in half, and do not have a art teacher anymore... The teacher assistants are teaching art. This is crazy. My children will not be attending next year there. Also if you don't pay for the holiday parties... They don't participate. And when i was in school it was parents brought in the goodies for the kids.. Not that it was pay or nothing at all!!! last year was awesome.. Hannah teacher was awesome... But this year, has been a total let down.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2008

What is the answer for a watered down traditional public school education? PIEDMONT COMMUNITY CHARTER SCHOOL! This school has a rigorous, college preparatory curriculum that begins in KINDERGARTEN! Both of my children attend PCCS and I am overwhelmed with the knowledge of rich world and U.S. history, literature and engaging math. They are being taught in a way that will set them a part. Even their art education is advanced-not only do they learn about the elements of art but about the artists like VanGogh, Michelangelo, da Vinci, Chagall and many more. Starting in kindergarten students even start to learn Spanish as a second language! This is the school for parents who want their child engaged and prepared for college.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2008

Our son has started his second year (1st grade), and we conld not be more pleased wiht the cirriculum and especially the teachers both this year and last. I can not see him or our other son (2yrs old) going anywhere else. When I see him interacting with other kids his age that go to other schools in the area, it blows me away how much he stands out from them in general behavior, atttitude, awareness and conversational skills. At this early age the impressions that Piedmont has made on him have made his mother and I very pleased. Thank you to the teachers and staff at PCCS. R. Jacobs
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

43 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
72%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students33%
Female36%
Male31%
Black15%
Asiann/a
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White42%
Economically disadvantaged15%
Not economically disadvantaged40%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students36%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English34%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant33%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students47%
Female46%
Male48%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Hispanic18%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English48%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant47%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students49%
Female48%
Male49%
Black12%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged45%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students55%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English49%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant49%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students59%
Female63%
Male55%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English59%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant59%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students26%
Female21%
Male33%
Black11%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White32%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged25%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students28%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English26%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant26%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students38%
Female34%
Male44%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White40%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilities20%
Non-disabled students40%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant38%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students13%
Female13%
Male14%
Black-5%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White15%
Economically disadvantaged15%
Not economically disadvantaged12%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students15%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English13%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant13%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students53%
Female54%
Male52%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantaged35%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students58%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female64%
Male60%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students28%
Female27%
Male30%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White26%
Economically disadvantaged14%
Not economically disadvantaged31%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students30%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English29%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant28%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students61%
Female75%
Male45%
Black53%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Not economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students62%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English61%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students26%
Female30%
Male22%
Black7%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White28%
Economically disadvantaged18%
Not economically disadvantaged27%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students29%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English26%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant26%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students53%
Female59%
Male48%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students56%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English53%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students65%
Female65%
Male65%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
75%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

44 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
77%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

72 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
58%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

42 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
76%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

71 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
90%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

20 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
50%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

39 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
56%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students19%
Female17%
Male22%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White27%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students21%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English20%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant19%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students50%
Female32%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White54%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students51%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students57%
Female54%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Economically disadvantaged80%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students60%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English58%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant57%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 72% 52%
Black 16% 26%
Hispanic 7% 14%
Two or more races 3% 4%
Asian 2% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mrs Jennifer Purdee
Fax number
  • (704) 853-3689

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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119 East 2nd Avenue
Gastonia, NC 28052
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 853-2428

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