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Greensboro Academy

Charter | K-8 | 722 students

 

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Living in Greensboro

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $170,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $720.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted July 18, 2013

Greensboro Academy is by far the best school in Greensboro. As a parent, I feel like I am always welcome and often invited to be a part of my child's education. The office staff is beyond excellent. Parents and students just love them. GA's approach to teaching and curriculum is beyond words. My children have thrived at this school and my questions, concerns and suggestions are always addressed. Our PTO goes over and above and I am thankful for them and the dedicated parents that volunteer so much of their time to be sure our school stays number one.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2012

If you want your 6 year old to run because they do not have a tucked in shirt then this is the school for you. They believe that a child blurting out is punishable by laps around the playground during recess. While this is hard to believe in the age of bullying awareness, I guess a child can only be humiliated by the school. As you can tell, we left once we became aware of it. The teachers are good, it is sad the administration supports this POLICY. Shocking.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2012

Greensboro Academy is the best school in Greensboro. I am thankful everyday that we were lucky enough to have our children attend this school. The teachers are wonderful. Great curriculum and the parent involvement can not be beat.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2011

Academic excellence - a safe, nurturing environment to accelerate our son's education. He has attended for three years now and the results speak for themselves. You could not find a finer institution, public or private, to send your own child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2008

We love Greensboro Academy! I am so thankful every day that we have this alternative to our neighborhood schools. We have 3 children in GA spanning from elementary to middle school and are working on our 5th year. The parental involvement is unbeatable and contributes to the overall family-like environment. I love being a volunteer! My children are challenged acadmically, encouraged to be their best, and will leave the school leaps and bounds ahead of their peers from other schools. The staff is wonderful - so loving and helpful to the kids and parents. The teachers truly love teaching and make the kids feel excited to learn. I am so thankful for our GA experience!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2008

I am a former student at G,A and went through 9 yrs at that school and I think it is one of the best schools around, it provides great education and enviroment.


Posted January 8, 2008

We are fortunate to have our Kindergartener at Greensboro Academy! Students can learn in this environment, largely because of the moral focus, discipline, and parental involvement that is required. Best of all our son is happy to go to school everyday.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 22, 2007

Greensboro Academy is excellent. We moved out of the area for about 3 years and could not wait to get our daughters back into the school. Our oldest is now at Northern High and clearly ahead of many of her peers. Our youngest is in 5th grade at GA and is doing so much better then when we lived in Phoenix, AZ.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2007

We love Greensboro Academy! My daughter started Kindergarten there last year and can't wait for 1st grade to begin. A high level of learning, as well as discipline being maintained.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2006

My daughter is in the 3rd grade and is really thriving here at Greensboro Academy. The curriculum is challenging, however her teacher makes learning fun.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2006

My daughter is in the 3rd grade at Greensboro Academy, and we are so pleased. The curriculum is challenging, however, her teacher makes learning fun, and she IS learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 24, 2005

First rate school. Superior to nearly all the Guilford County schools. Curriculum is much more extensive than in the county schools. Far better behavior demanded of the students and much, much, much more parent involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2005

My two children have been with the academy since its begining. Their development is without a doubt the best I could ever ask for, they enjoy the enviroment and really love the teachers that they have had in the past years. I highly recommed this school to everyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2004

Thank goodness for Greensboro Academy. Our two youngest have been there since it opened. Without it, we would have been left with no affordable alternative to home schooling them since the schools they would have otherwise been assigned to are notorious for poor performance (due to lack of parental commitment and abysmal leadership from the Guilford County Schools central office). The curriculum is first rate and the parents are truly involved in their children's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2004

Greensboro Academy is a wonderful place to build strong young minds and nurture knowledge as well as morals. The staff is great and make teaching students a personal experience. All 3 of my guys benefit from being there.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students74%
Female77%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female77%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English64%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students75%
Female74%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students76%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant75%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female69%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students72%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students68%
Female66%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female71%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant75%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students41%
Female37%
Male44%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White46%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students42%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students67%
Female74%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Economically disadvantaged47%
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English67%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant67%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students74%
Female81%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students81%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students75%
Female80%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students78%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant75%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female72%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students54%
Female59%
Male49%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant54%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students53%
Female56%
Male49%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students55%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English53%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students66%
Female67%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant66%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students51%
Female56%
Male47%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White51%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students54%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 82% 52%
Black 6% 26%
Asian 5% 3%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Two or more races 4% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • North Carolina Honors School of Excellence (2006)
  • North Carolina Honors School of Excellence (2005)
  • North Carolina Honors School of Excellence (2004)

Special education / special needs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Special education

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Latin
School leaders can update this information here.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
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School basics

School start time
  • 8:15am
School end time
  • 8:15am
School Leader's name
  • Mr Rudy Swofford
Fax number
  • (336) 286-8403

Programs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Special education
Foreign languages taught
  • Latin
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
Performing arts
  • Drama
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
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School culture

Dress Code
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4049 Battleground Avenue
Greensboro, NC 27410
Website: Click here
Phone: (336) 286-8404

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