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Triad Math And Science Academy

Charter | K-11 | 573 students

We are best known for focus on math, science, & tech.

 
 

Living in Greensboro

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $107,200. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $640.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 17 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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37 reviews of this school


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Posted April 8, 2014

ls a great school for my kids. It's a great fit. We like the school's teachers and staff. They have excellent afterschool clubs and Saturday school. The school is like a second family to my kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 7, 2014

I have two children who attend TMSA (elementary) and we love it. The school is very diverse with students and teachers from different parts of the world. The staff demonstrate knowledge and care for every child's education by way of their programs offered after school and on Saturday's. Also, communication among teachers and parents is great! When it comes to "true" education, it should be one that provide children with a global mindset and TMSA is the place. Students, also, have the opportunity to travel abroad during the summer - how cool is that? Goooo Tigers!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 5, 2014

This school is horrible I'm in 8th grade and they are pushing us too hard. We have a minimum of two hours each night of homework. They force us to take spanish or turkish ! In 8th grade we have only spanish or turkish and physical education. Many students can't do clubs after school because they have to do all their homework. I hate everything about this school. I can take the exact same classes and more at my old school. Please I'm begging you do not put your children through this stress. The only good thing about this school is it looks good on an application. But it doesn't look the best, if anything send your high school bounf kids to Page for the IB programme that's where I'm going. Or send high school students to Page until 10th grade then from 11-12th send them to Greensboro College Middle College. The uniforms are horrible and they are always changing rules. It's a horribly small school and it is so out of order. Send your kids here to be pressured and stressed out of their minds. This school is HORRIBLE. Coming from a current student, please. Don't come here.


Posted November 18, 2013

they do not treat children right i know from experience (by former 10th grader) bully reports are ignored. also test scores should be a 2 for this school. they do not give good education they are teaching 10th graders 9th grade work .very awful school!


Posted October 9, 2013

The dedication of the staff is wonderful. They seem to really care about the children and the education that they are receiving. The children come home happy after having a good day at school, and yet they are leaning at grade level or above.


Posted July 30, 2013

As a parent of a TMSA student it has been great to see my child eager to participate, grow in knowledge, and confidence. The Teachers are the best in their field of studies and methodology. TMSA is a wonderful safe and futuristic learning environment!! School exceeds my expectations of a higher level academic achievement school. The Teachers' dedication at Triad Math and Science Academy is unmatched. The curriculum is challenging and the academic clubs offered expose the students to advanced science, robotics, foreign languages and many other subjects. The opportunities the students at TMSA have are unprecedented!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2013

My family is excited about our child to attending Triad Math and Science Academy. This fall will be our 3rd year there and I must say, each year has gotten progressively better. Our first year was good in that we saw growth (both academically and socially) in our child. I am extremely proud to see the emergence of the leader within our son and I can say that is largely due to the positive staff (all levels) guidance, leadership, professionalism and genuine care which is demonstrated each day. We have had a couple minor concerns and were able to discuss them within the same day to reach a positive resoultion. The staff seems genuinely concerned for the success of all students. The principal has a tremendous amount of responsibility, but I found it comforting to see him walking the halls to make sure everything was running smoothly. There were times when he would even ask, how are things going and actually waited for me to give feed back. All of my son's teachers have been extremely professional while also personable. My son has made some really great friends and lifetime mentors. I am thankful to have Triad Math and Science Academy to help nurture his academic career.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2013

I have been working at TMSA for 3 years. I have seen all the growth and success. Students have been doing great on the state tests and on the academic as well as athletic teams. TMSA moved to its state-of-art facility in its third year. This year, TMSA will be a complete K-12 school with 700 students. The former substitute teacher, who posted a negative feedback, is obviously not at TMSA anymore because she doesn t fit in the mission and vision of this great school. Regarding the visa factory statement, there are only 3 Turkish employees (out of 60+ staff) who are on an H1B visa. TMSA is a very diverse school in terms of both students and teachers. It is funny to undermine this strength with this type of cheap and non-factual statements!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted June 7, 2013

My children have attended TMSA for 3 years. At first I had a problem with the disciplinary rules, but it has improve greatly. The math and science teachers for middle school are great. My child was accepted into an Early College program which shows she was well prepared. There are several areas I like about the school. For example, they provide tutoring after school and during the spring break they have math camp to prepare students for the EOG tests. They also have various academic clubs such as Science Olympiad, Math Olympiad, Lego League, etc.. I found if you e-mail a teacher they will respond in time. Also they provide weekly progress reports that helps the parents keep up with their child's school work and grades. One 8th grade student was ranked 3 in the state of North Carolina for academic achievement in math. That is a testament by it self for the school. At Triad Math and Science Academy, diversity in the school is exceptional. My children have learned from their teachers and peers different cultures and ways of life. I recommend Triad Math and Science Academy for children who are serious about academic achievement. My youngest will enter middle school this fall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2013

This year has been a great year for my children. I found the dedication to go beyond what I have experienced in other schools and the opportunities are absolutely great! The free tutoring, after school clubs and extra curricular activities have all been a plus for them! There is no excuse for not succeeding! As a result of attending the afterschool teams they learn that working hard with teammates can be very rewarding. The school even offers full immersion language summer camp overseas. I can't wait to have the opportunity for my child to experience this opportunity and to share what could be a life changing experience. I love the emphasis on academic teams as well as having sports teams available. The diversity is a huge plus for this school. I can't think of a better place to learn tolerance and acceptance than in the lives of my young children. Thank you for a great year and we look forward to returning in the fall! P.S. My daughter told me she did not want to have to leave school for the summer and that she wanted to stay in school! NOW THAT IS AWESOME!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2013

TMSA has been the greatest place for my daughter has been at shool for 4 years. We love TMSA because of the class size,the hands on experience that the kids get, the after school clubs and the free after school and weekend tutoring. The teachers and the administrators are great. They will respond to your concerns in a timely and a professional manner. My child has had a great year and we are looking forward to another great year of HIgh School. Thank you TMSA staff and faculty for making TMSA a great place. If there are any parents out there who are looking for a great learning environment then you cannot go wrong with TMSA. The diversity of the student population, faculty and staff reminds me of the United Nations!!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2013

I transferred my two students to TMSA from a Guilford County School of Excellence. We were not unhappy with their old school but I wanted more for my children in their middle school years than what seemed to be a segregated population. My children have been at TMSA for two years now and will return in the fall. They have grown both academically and in character over these two years. TMSA provides a strong math, science, technology, language arts, and social studies curriculum. TMSA also provides a wide diversity of cultures that allow students to experience an environment that closely resembles what the adult (working) world is like and encourages students to learn from each other about their different cultures. It continues to be a pleasure to be part of the TMSA Family. I look forward to next school year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 4, 2013

As a former substitute teacher at this school, my advice to prospective students and their parents: FIND ANOTHER SCHOOL! This place is far too concerned about its prestige in winning competitions than it is about teaching students. Most of the students are badly prepared for more advanced work. The teachers work very hard, but the administration undermines their work by promoting students to higher grades to keep up appearances. This is by no means a "math and science academy." It is a visa factory for Turkish nationals who want to come to the US.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted June 2, 2013

Tmsa was a good choice for us in the beginning but the main things are the language barrier with some of the teachers, mostly the middle school teachers and lack of discipline. I was so scared to go to school some days due to it kids there just run wild and control the classrooms. I love the elementary teachers and students but as you get to the higher grades there is a lot more favoritism towards the Turkish culture. One of my teachers who was Turkish completely ignored me when I asked for help and I failed the class while he was helping a classmate of mine who was Turkish who didn't ask for help. Mostly if you think you deal with a language barrier, poor discipline and lack of respect this school is for you, though the academics are great its those main points that completely destroy what TMSA wanted to be. Also their information site TMSA Connect is good on some points but most of my teachers are afraid of the computer and don't use tmsa connect at all. So if they tell you how great it is its not, my teacher doesn't like to tell anyone anything. For example he said we would have a test and the date was on tmsa connect, so that night, and test day, I went on and it wasn't there.


Posted May 22, 2013

The best in town. The teachers really care about the students, your kids will really enjoy this school.


Posted April 16, 2013

As a former parent I would suggest that anyone considering sending their child here do some careful investigation. I can only speak to the elementary school and the teachers there are wonderful, dedicated professionals. The biggest problems with this school come from the administration and lack of professional leadership. The Board of Directors are not "hands on" and allow the principal to dictate day to day operations. The students are not always held accountable to the same rules and the discipline policy is not used. Parents are discouraged from helping except when the principal gives them a specific task. Anyone asking questions is labeled as a troublemaker. Teachers are basically told to shut up and do what they are told. This school has the potential to be great but as long as the current principal is allowed to remain you will not see the expected growth. Excellent students and parents are leaving all the time. If you are looking for a school that adheres to the charter school concept of parents, teachers and administration working together for students then I strongly suggest you look elsewhere. Parents must be the ones to decide what is best for their child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2013

What I think everyone should know about TMSA is the teacher involvement and dedication to the student. It is an honor and a privilege to have teachers who are willing to give over and beyond their time, effort and energy to our students. My son is made to feel important and encouraged to learn AND enjoy learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2013

I am sorry to see that someone was so unhappy with this school that they felt the need to post a negative review. This school is not for everyone, but for those who are willing to work hard & become a part of this dynamic community the rewards are great. My son has been a student here since the school opened & with only a few exceptions, I think you would be hard pressed to find a school in Guilford County that has a more caring or dedicated staff. The high school English, Math, & History departments cannot be beat and the High School Dean is the best around. My family is honored to be part of the TMSA community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2013

My son attended this school for one year. Many of the other students left before the end of the year. I kept hoping it would get better. It never did. So glad to be at a Guilford County School with teachers that understand how to teach and for us, it was important fot have the teachers and administrators speak proper English. I love diversity but it was so difficult to communicate with so many at this school. The Principal was horrible and that is very important.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2013

This is the best school that my child have attended. TMSA has a caring and challenging learning environment and we are thrilled with the teachers and their efforts.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
73%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
60%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
64%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
71%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
50%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students29%
Female27%
Male33%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students29%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English31%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students31%
Female37%
Male17%
Black26%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English33%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant31%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students46%
Female41%
Male48%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students49%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students48%
Female41%
Male52%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students51%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English49%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant48%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students35%
Female29%
Male41%
Black30%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White36%
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students36%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students39%
Female33%
Male46%
Black26%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students43%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant39%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students35%
Female29%
Male41%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White50%
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students38%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students35%
Female29%
Male39%
Black23%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged41%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students36%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students55%
Female44%
Male63%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students58%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English56%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students51%
Female34%
Male62%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students51%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female53%
Male69%
Black56%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students62%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female46%
Male42%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged40%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students48%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English44%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students45%
Female50%
Male42%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English45%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students69%
Female68%
Male69%
Black65%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students72%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
84%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

25 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

20 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
>95%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

30 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
87%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students39%
Female40%
Male39%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilities7%
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant39%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students36%
Female32%
Male41%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students41%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English39%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant36%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students48%
Female46%
Male50%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students55%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English48%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant48%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 56% 26%
White 31% 52%
Asian 5% 3%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 1% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 27%N/A50%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Teacher resources

Foreign languages spoken by school staff Arabic languages
German
Russian
Spanish
Turkish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • 3rd place in FLL Robotics NC Competition (2011)
  • 4th place in Future City Design NC Competition (2011)
  • 2nd place in Regional Science Fair, 4th place in Science Olympiad Division B Regionals, 4th place in Science Olympiad Division (2011)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Technology
Clubs
  • Gardening

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Clubs
  • Student newspaper
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
  • Turkish
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Arabic languages
  • German
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Turkish

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Clubs
  • Gardening

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Mr Hakan Orak
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
  • Phone
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (336) 621-0072

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Technology
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
  • Turkish

Resources

Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Arabic languages
  • German
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Turkish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Career/college counseling
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
Transportation options
  • None
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer
  • Garden
  • Gym
  • Library
  • Playground
School leaders can update this information here.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Fitness Walking
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Gardening
  • Student newspaper
  • Yearbook
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

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700 Creek Ridge Road
Greensboro, NC 27406
Website: Click here
Phone: (336) 621-0061

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