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John Van Lindley Elementary School

Public | PK-5 | 421 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted February 28, 2014

This school serves a diverse population of students from wealthy to poor, yet the overall atmosphere fosters equality and acceptance. In nine years, all but 2 of of the 14 classroom teachers my children have had have been excellent, while even those 2 were perfectly good. The principal is kind, intelligent, energetic and effective, and there are many parents who take a lot of time to be very involved. In fact, I don't know of any parents who are truly able who don't volunteer on a regular basis. There are limits to what any public school in NC can accomplish at this time, but I think Lindley has the best combination of mostly excellent teachers, a great principal, a very supportive community of parents and neighbors, and a really wonderful "melting pot" of students, and the quality of education my children have received/are receiving there is the best there is in public schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2014

Worst school ever. The teachers are rude and not at all welcoming. Also i feel that special needs students should be better taking care of. I am so ready for my daughter to be able to attend "regular" classroom setting as they call it. Shes been to frazier elementary and let me say the teachers actually made me feel like i was included in everything and like my child was actually improving.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2013

Not all teachers are kind, some are great while others seem tired of teaching & being around children. Not a warm welcome from really anyone on staff. Uncomfortable at tbest
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 15, 2013

Our neighborhood school is John Van Lindley Elementary in Greensboro, NC. I can't say enough good things about it in a small space! The teachers and staff are all very caring and nurturing and the environment at the school is first-rate. The teachers work hard with the parents to make sure their students are working up to par. The kids help plant and harvest a garden on the school grounds, they learn about good citizenship and sustainability, and they have fun while they learn. Sadly, it's been a year since my son was at that school, and two years for my daughter; and when we run into any of the teachers or staff out in the greater community, they still remember both my children's names and are very interested in what they are doing now. I wish we could have moved Lindley with us when we made the transition to middle school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2013

We love our neighborhood school and are lucky to live within walking distance. This allows our children to feel like Lindley is part of their normal lives and not just some place they go for school. We have a 2nd grader and a kindergartener - and have been pleased with all of our teachers to date. Our kids are challenged and even in subjects in which they excel, we are given feedback about additional learnings they can do to build on their knowledge. I volunteer in the school two mornings a week before I go to work and it still amazes me that all of the teachers and staff call my children by name. It may seem like a small thing but it means a great deal to me. I am a member of the active PTA at Lindley and have had opportunity to get to know other parents through our volunteer efforts. If you are considering Lindley - I say - do it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2013

Lindley Elementary School is one of the best you will find in Guilford County. The teachers are fabulous and always try to use hands-on learning. I am ashamed that a parent would write that when they obviously only gave them bad ratings after one mishap with traffic. There are so many great activities for your child to learn at this school. The principal is very involved, he is always going around checking up on classrooms.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 7, 2013

The reviews on this site are rehashing some really old tapes about Lindley. We have two children who attend (2nd and 4th grade), and both have had exceptional teachers and are receiving a solid education in a supportive environment. Lindley's principal, Dr. Woody, is an outstanding leader--enthusiastic, caring and a great communicator. He supports his staff, listens to parents, respects students, celebrates the positive things that are happening, and acts on feedback/concerns. Our dedicated PTA started and maintains a school garden where students, teachers and families come together to learn and grow. Service learning part of Lindley's philosophy, and students participate in several community projects throughout the year. We love the socio-economic and racial/ethnic diversity within the school, which gives kids exposure to new ways of looking at the world. Lindley's students are performing well on the EOG's (end of grade tests), and the school has been recognized as a "School of Distinction" within the district for two years in a row. We're proud to be Lindley Lions and highly recommend the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 6, 2012

My son went to prek and kindergarten. I was blessed to be fired. So I had the time to sit in the classroom for 2 months of his 2nd year there. Both teachers did not have control of their classrooms. Teachers where tied up with low functioning mainstreamed kids, so they did not have time for the rest of their classes. Left alone they ran wild as the year went on. I did email the superintendent to get the principle out of the road directing traffic. She was endangering my child saying I could not turn left. There was no one left waiting on the street to get in and the street was clear. Since she was not legally a crossing guard I could have called the police on her instead. I was considered a trouble maker for not allowing her to ILLEGALLY INCOMPETENTLY direct traffic. It has been a peaceful year. I don't have homework to teach to him with nonsensical directions. He enjoys learning and reading. Something that was not happening at Lindley. I never wanted to homeschool or figure out how to do it. But it has been a HUGE blessing in disguise. If you didn't agree with them, you where the issue not the school, regardless of the legalities of it. I tried many times, many meetings.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2011

We were not heard as parents there either. They pretended to help but we barely saw improvements. The principal (Ms. Conaway) ignored our requests. We took both our children out and they are now in private school. I must say it was okay for one of the children, but just okay. They are both now in 3rd grade and still struggling to understand what they read. We do practice daily. We had to go over every homework with the children, often times having to explain things from the beginning. After a full day of work that became very frustrating. A few of the teachers there are very good, very committed. However, it's really a matter of luck if your child will have them or not because parents can't choose anything at Lindley. Too bad now we are spending more than we can afford to make sure they have a good education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2010

We have spent almost three years at this school and I have never seen so much emotional abuse and irresponsible leadership in my entire life. The principal doesn't care about the childen, she cares about everything "appearing" great, while the teacher's have free reign over treating students and guilting them at will. I still cannot understand, even after hearing similar stories from other parents, how this school still is ran by whom it is and how it receives great ratings. I am moving to make sure my youngest daughter never steps foot in this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 26, 2007

I feel my children are safe and cared about at Lindley Elementary. Every teacher my fourth grader has had has really been involved with us. I can't wait to send my five year old to kindergarten.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
69%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
63%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students65%
Female65%
Male65%
Black36%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilities43%
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Academically gifted94%

Reading

All Students60%
Female61%
Male59%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilities43%
Non-disabled students65%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically gifted94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students55%
Female54%
Male55%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanic47%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilities21%
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English56%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students38%
Female35%
Male40%
Black16%
Asiann/a
Hispanic13%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilities5%
Non-disabled students48%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English39%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant38%
Academically gifted89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students70%
Female61%
Male81%
Black36%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English71%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant70%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students52%
Female43%
Male62%
Black14%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students55%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Academically gifted91%

Science

All Students57%
Female54%
Male62%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students63%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English56%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant57%
Academically gifted86%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 48% 52%
Black 25% 26%
Hispanic 18% 14%
Two or more races 6% 4%
Asian 4% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 58%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Aaron Woody
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (336) 294-7363

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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2700 Camden Road
Greensboro, NC 27403
Website: Click here
Phone: (336) 294-7360

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